News Archive

2024


Two Bayboro Programs Enjoy Easter, Spring

Cosmetology student showing her Easter crafts

April 3, 2024

Students and instructors in the college’s Cosmetology and Esthetics programs recently celebrated Easter and Spring Break!

Students in both programs enjoyed an Easter egg hunt inside the Cosmetology Building in Bayboro to kick start the excitement for spring break, which was set for April 1-5.

Additionally, Beginning Cosmetology students took part in an Easter-inspired hairstyling contest. Participants fixed their mannequins’ hair in interesting styles and added makeup and decorations.

Their entries then were judged by the advanced Cosmetology students and Esthetics students. Prizes were awarded to the first-, second, and third-place finishers.

Cammie Farrar won first place in the contest, Autumn Schroeder finished second and Samyiah Maiden finished third.

Similar hairstyling contests took place in the Beginners’ class on Halloween, Christmas, and Valentine’s Day.

The instructors enjoyed watching the students participate and had a few treats themselves! There were Easter bags for everyone!

For more information about the college’s Cosmetology or Esthetics programs, please call 252-249-1851, ext. 3130.


Nominate a Grade for PCC Alumnus Award!

Larry Monk receiving 2023 PCC Alumnus Award

April 3, 2024

What do actor Tom Hanks, the late baseball star Jackie Robinson, the late Apple co-founder Steve Jobs, and author Amy Tan all have in common? They each attended community colleges and became leaders in their fields!

The Pamlico Community College Foundation is now inviting nominations from faculty, staff, current and former students, and members of the community for the 2024-25 PCC Alumnus of the Year. You may nominate more than one person, but only one is chosen for the award.

Please submit your nomination(s) in this format:

  1. Name of person being nominated, place of employment, and title (if employed)
  2. Contact information of the person being nominated
  3. Your name and contact information
  4. Two or more paragraphs telling us why the nominee should receive the award.
  • How do they make their community a better place to live?
  • What personal or professional accomplishments of theirs do you admire?/li>
  • List any leadership roles and community service activities, and any other qualities that make them stand out.
  • How did PCC positively impact this candidate?
  • How will this individual’s story reflect positively on PCC?
  • Include the nominee’s work history and education history if you know it.

Be descriptive and make your candidate(s) come to life, which will assist our selection committee in selecting a recipient.

Larry Monk, a 2012 PCC graduate who currently leads the college’s Electrical Systems Technology program, was honored as the Alumnus of the Year for 2023-24. He was recognized at last year’s Commencement ceremony.

Submit your nominations by close of business Wednesday, April 17, to Heather Arevalo at harevalo@pamlicocc.edu. You may choose to remain anonymous.

For more information, please call 252-249-1851, ext. 3084.


Get Caught Up or Get Ahead This Summer!

Student viewing paper with laptop in background

March 18, 2024

Summer is a great time for students to enroll in the tough-to-get courses they need for their programs, to get caught up in their studies, to get ahead in their coursework, or even to try something new!

Pamlico Community College will be offering a robust slate of curriculum courses this summer to meet the needs of current students as well as men and women who might be enrolled in other colleges or universities.

The college has scheduled in-demand, transferable courses in biology, chemistry, communications, English, geology, history, math, music appreciation, psychology, sociology, and more. Courses in career programs such as Criminal Justice Technology and Electrical Systems Technology also will be available.

Additionally, PCC will be offering seated courses in hands-on curriculum programs such as Cosmetology and Welding Technology.

Registration for the Summer Term officially opens on Monday, March 25. Summer Term courses will begin May 20 and will conclude July 29.

“Pamlico’s Summer Term is a great opportunity to take a class or two to get ahead or get caught up after a rough semester,” said Counselor/Career Center Director Cristy Lewis Warner, who works with students from other institutions. “Current PCC students and those visiting from other community colleges or universities will find a small college with a big heart ready and willing to welcome them into our learning community.”

All of Pamlico’s transferable-credit courses will be offered in a convenient online format, and students who successfully complete them will be able to use the hours earned here at PCC, at another N.C. community college, or at a University of North Carolina system member institution.

Many private colleges and universities also accept these credits.

“Taking classes over the Summer Term can move you closer to finishing your degree, whether here or away,” Warner said. “As the weather gets hot, heat up the pace of your education by planning a few Summer Term courses to get ahead. Because they’re offered online, you’ll still have plenty of time to work a job or enjoy some days at the beach.”

Neil Callahan, the college’s director of academic advising, said enrolling in Summer Term courses was a fantastic option for high-schoolers who are enrolled in Career & College Promise (CCP) courses to earn additional college credits.

“Current CCP students who are rising seniors and those graduating after May 20 have a unique opportunity to take advantage of transferable course offerings at PCC this summer,” he said. “For rising seniors, you can get a head start on finishing up your CCP Transfer Pathway. For graduating seniors, you can gain a few extra courses to take with you when you apply to four-year institutions. The best part of all of this is that these courses are tuition-free! You can save hundreds and thousands of dollars before you go off to college.”

Pamlico’s Summer 2024 curriculum course schedule is posted on the college’s website at https://pamlicocc.edu/wp-content/uploads/2024/03/2024SU_Schedule_3.13.24.pdf

Current PCC students who are interested in Summer Term courses should speak with their advisors. New and visiting students should contact Student Services at studentservices@pamlicocc.edu or by phone at 252-249-1851, ext. 3001.


Dialysis Tech Course to Start March 18

March 11, 2024

There’s still time to register for the next session of Pamlico Community College’s Dialysis Technician course, and there is financial aid available for qualified students.

The short-term training program, which teaches men and women to operate the hemodialysis machine (a piece of lifesaving equipment used to filter dialysis patients’ blood) is scheduled to start on Monday, March 18.

It will be offered in a hybrid format, meaning some classes will meet in person in the evening from 5:30 to 9:30 p.m., and other coursework will be available online.

Cost of the course is $180.55, and financial aid is available for those who qualify.

“This is a wonderful opportunity for people who want to get into health care or who want to enhance their health care credentials,” said Lori Giles, the college’s chair of Continuing Education and Technical Programs. “There is strong demand for dialysis technicians, and our program prepares men and women to meet that need.”

The Dialysis Technician program, which began in August 2021, is part of the college’s ongoing commitment to offer more short-term training programs that respond to industry needs and that can lead to good jobs in all sectors, including in the area’s growing healthcare field.

Kacynthia Ingram, a New Bern nurse who is originally from Ohio, leads the Dialysis Technician program. Her students learn the theoretical, technical, and clinical skills needed to maintain dialysis equipment and to provide care to patients being treated for chronic renal diseases.

Classes include hands-on lab activities with the college’s state-of-the-art dialysis machinery.

A critical part of the program is learning to deal with dialysis patients in a kind, compassionate, and empathetic manner. Patients undergoing dialysis can visit clinics up to three times per week for three- to four-hour-long appointments, so it’s important for technicians to learn the skills necessary to make clients feel at ease.

For more information or to register for the Dialysis Technician course, please contact Lori Giles at 252-249-1851, ext. 3015, or lgiles@pamlicocc.edu.


Oyster Revival Brings Hungry Crowd to PCC

February 26, 2024

A hungry crowd of roughly 200 people enjoyed 22 bushels of oysters, devoured eight crockpots of delicious homemade chili, and most importantly, raised funds for student scholarships at the 12th Annual Great Oyster Revival & Chili Cookoff last Saturday at Pamlico Community College.

Final totals are not yet available, but the popular PCC Foundation event, which took place in and around the college’s Delamar Center, raised thousands of dollars to help students accomplish their academic goals.

Saturday’s event marked the first time the PCC Foundation had hosted the Great Oyster Revival & Chili Cookoff since November 2021, and it was the first one since the passing of longtime chief organizer and PCC Foundation Executive Director Michelle Noevere, who died in August 2023 after a battle with cancer.

“I hope Michelle Noevere is looking down at us and smiling,” said current PCC Foundation Executive Director Heather Arevalo, who spearheaded Saturday’s event. “We are so thankful for all of the support we have received from our generous community, and I want to personally thank all of the volunteers who helped make this event a success. Thank you so much!”

The late Dr. Cleve Cox, who served as the college’s president in the early 2000s, conceived of the event as a way for the community to come together, socialize, and raise money for a good cause.

Saturday’s event was just that.

The crowd began arriving even before the event’s official 3 p.m. start time. Familiar faces from past Oyster Revivals stood side-by-side with newcomers as a team of cooks prepared and delivered piles of the briny delights to outdoor shucking tables.

Meanwhile, attendees lined up inside the Delamar Center to serve themselves chili and to visit with their neighbors. At a table near the serving line, judges Missy Baskervill (Pamlico County commissioner), PCC Vice President of Student Services Jamie D. Gibbs, and Pamlico County Emergency Management Director/Fire Marshal Chris Murray sampled and scored each entry in the chili contest.

Talented local musicians Hoff’n’Finch provided the entertainment outdoors. Picnic tables were available for sitting and eating, while some visitors brought their chairs so they could sit outside, enjoy the music, and visit with their neighbors.

The weather was nearly ideal.

PCC employee Albert Krelie Jr. won first place for his “Big Al’s Crazy Chili,” narrowly beating Donna Simons and her “Creamy Chili”. Krelie and Simons each will receive a trophy, some prizes, and of course, bragging rights for a year.

Bobby Cahoon won the 50-50 raffle, announcing he planned to donate his $272 share to the Pamlico County Republican Party. Arevalo’s daughter, Ashlynn, pulled the winning ticket.

Several door prizes donated by area businesses were also given away.

The Foundation wishes to thank area businesses and individuals for agreeing to be sponsors, including Pearl Sponsors Jim and Michelle Krauss and Dr. Sherri Hicks of Oriental Village Veterinary Hospital.

Briny-level sponsors included Dr. Garnett Whitehurst, Access East – Farmworker Health Department, and Dan Roberts of Edward Jones Investments. Chili Cookoff Sponsors were Brantley’s Village Restaurant of Oriental and The Insurance Center of New Bern.

Prize donors included Bayboro Pharmacy, Ben Wynne – Champion Sports & Fitness, Minnesott Yacht Golf & Country Club, Nautical Wheelers, New Village Brewery, Pamlico Gifts, PCC Cosmetology and Esthetics, and Zac Schnell.

Supply donors were Allyson Woolard, Cristy Lewis Warner, Jennifer Paul, Joe Flynn, Kathy Mayo, Kim Hough, Kim Taylor, LaTanya Bryant, Laura West, Lee Tillman, Martha Whitford, Rhonda Tillman, Sandy Wall, Starr Murphy, Susan McRoy and Tina Ormond.

For more information about the PCC Foundation, call 252-249-1851, ext. 3084.


Two Bayboro Programs Wrap Up a Busy Month

February 15, 2024

Students and instructors in the college’s Cosmetology and Esthetics programs have had a busy February!

Advanced Cosmetology students and Esthetics students have been assisting clients with a Valentine’s Day-themed pampering package that included a 30-minute strawberry and chocolate facial, plus a shampoo, blow-dry, and style.

Meanwhile, the Beginning Cosmetology students took part in a Valentine’s-inspired hairstyling contest on Feb. 14. Participants fixed their mannequins’ hair in attractive “upstyles” and added makeup and decorations.

Their entries were then judged by the advanced Cosmetology students and Esthetics students. Prizes were awarded to the first-, second, and third-place finishers. The winners, pictured, from left, were: Haleigh Murray, who won first place, Samyiah Maiden, who won second place, and Autumn Schroeder, who took third place.

Similar hairstyling contests took place in the Beginners class at Halloween and Christmas.

To top it off, Esthetics Instructor Shanna Lewis celebrated her birthday this month!

For more information about the college’s Cosmetology or Esthetics programs, which are headquartered in Bayboro, please call 252-249-1851, ext. 3130.


Mills Cousins Choose Post-Military Careers

February 12, 2024

Two area men who served the country in uniform are successfully transitioning to rewarding careers in electrical work with a little help from Pamlico Community College.

First cousins Mike Mills, 43, and Justin Mills, 34, say they are attracted to work installing and servicing electrical wiring and equipment because of the earning potential and the opportunity to work with their hands.

Both men sought to improve their prospects by enrolling in the college’s Electrical Systems Technology program.

Mike Mills, who served 20 years in the U.S. Coast Guard, graduated from the program in 2022 and is now working to secure his state electrical license. Justin Mills, who spent 15 years in the U.S. Army, is enrolled in the program now.

Both men also work with electricity on side jobs, most recently helping install wiring and other electrical equipment at a residential construction site in Pamlico County.

“I knew I wanted to get in the construction trades when I got out of the Coast Guard,” said Mike Mills. “The electrical program gave me a good baseline. Work allows me to apply what I’ve learned.”

The college’s Electrical Systems Technology program trains students to install and maintain electrical and electronic systems found in homes, businesses, and industrial sites.

Coursework, most of which is hands-on, includes topics such as AC/DC theory, basic wiring practices, programmable logic controllers, industrial motor controls, applications of the National Electric Code and other subjects.

Students can earn a two-year Associate of Applied Science degree, and there are certificate options available.

Like his cousin, Justin Mills knew he wanted a hands-on career after his military service. His father is a licensed electrician, which helped him narrow his focus.

Justin Mills said aspects of working with electricity reminded him of his Army job as a jumpmaster and his work as an EMT: You must follow rules and adhere to important guidelines or people get hurt – or worse.

Both men said PCC’s Electrical Systems Technology program taught them how to troubleshoot malfunctioning systems and to solve problems. Those skills are handy, particularly as plans change and evolve during residential construction, Mike Mills said.

Justin Mills adds the skills learned in the program also help when you discover wiring and switches that have been installed incorrectly.

The Mills cousins encourage men and women who think they might be interested in the field to enroll in the program and see what it takes to work with electricity.

Larry Monk, a 2012 graduate of the program, is the lead instructor. For more information, contact him at lmonk@pamlicocc.edu or 252-249-1851, ext. 3029.


Great Oyster Revival Coming to PCC Feb. 24

February 5, 2024

After a 2½-year hiatus, the Pamlico Community College Foundation is resuming one of its most popular fundraisers. It has scheduled the 12th edition of the Great Oyster Revival & Chili Cookoff for Saturday, Feb. 24, from 3 to 5 p.m. at the Grantsboro campus.

This year’s event has been returned to the traditional fourth Saturday in February date, but, like the last Oyster Revival in 2021, it will take place outside the college’s Delamar Center rather than in the courtyard outside the Student Lounge.

Organizers say participants can look forward to indulging themselves with all-you-can-eat salty oysters as well as samples from multiple crockpots of enjoyable homemade chili prepared by some of the area’s best cooks – all for a good cause.

Local musicians Hoff’n’Finch will provide the entertainment. The event will take place rain or shine.

“We are very excited about bringing back the Great Oyster Revival & Chili Cookoff,” said Heather Arevalo, executive director of the PCC Foundation. “We are hoping to host a large crowd, and we expect the food to be delicious, as always. Most importantly, we hope to raise money to fund student scholarships here at Pamlico Community College.”

For years, the Great Oyster Revival & Chili Cookoff took place in late February. However, the COVID pandemic forced organizers to move the 2021 event to November.

Even more difficult decisions had to be made in subsequent years after the late Michelle Noevere, the PCC Foundation’s former executive director and the event’s chief organizer, began a courageous battle with cancer.

Both the 2022 and 2023 events were canceled. Noevere, a longtime champion of the college, died Aug. 7, 2023.

“It feels a little strange to host the Great Oyster Revival & Chili Cookoff without Michelle, but she would certainly want us to resume this tradition because it helps so many students achieve their educational goals,” Arevalo said. “We’re going to do our best to host a great event. We’re inviting the community to bring their friends and join us for an afternoon of food, fun and great music.”

Tickets for the event are $30 each, with “chili-only” tickets available for $15 each. Tickets are on sale at the PCC Bookstore, Nautical Wheelers (both the Oriental and New Bern locations) and Bayboro Pharmacy. Tickets also are available online at www.pamlicocc.edu.

As in previous years, oyster eaters will stand shoulder-to-shoulder outdoors at large tables to shuck and eat their fill. Inside the Delamar Center, event participants will be able to sample the various chilis entered in the cookoff.

Attendees are encouraged to bring their own gloves, knives and condiments. Iced tea and bottled water will be provided, and participants can bring their own beverages.

In addition, area cooks are invited to enter a crockpot of their best chili for the cookoff. The first- and second-place winners each will receive a trophy, a prize and bragging rights. Chili entries will be due by 2 p.m. on the day of the contest.

The Foundation wishes to thank area businesses and individuals for agreeing to be sponsors, including Jim and Michelle Krauss, Dan Roberts of Edward Jones, Dr. Sherri Hicks of Oriental Village Veterinary Hospital, Nautical Wheelers, and Bayboro Pharmacy.

“We’re inviting everyone to come out and support the college and its mission of helping community members improve their lives through higher education,” said PCC Acting President Michelle Willis Krauss. “It’s going to be a great day.”

For more information, please contact the PCC Foundation at 252-249-1851, ext. 3084, or harevalo@pamlicocc.edu.


Spoil Your Sweetie – or Yourself – at PCC

January 26, 2024

It’s time to spoil your sweetie – or yourself!

Pamlico Community College’s Esthetics and Cosmetology departments will be offering their popular Valentine’s gift package on Feb. 13, 14, and 15!

The pampering package will include a 30-minute strawberry and chocolate facial performed by Esthetics students, plus a shampoo, blow-dry, and style done by Cosmetology students.

Appointments are required. Times are 9:30 a.m., 10:15 a.m., 11 a.m., 11:45 a.m. and 12:30 p.m.

The cost is $16. The location is PCC Cosmetology Building off N.C. 55 (Main Street) in Bayboro.

For more information or to schedule an appointment, please call 252-249-1851, ext. 3130.

Happy Valentine’s Day!


UNC System Virtual Transfer Fair

January 17, 2024

We hope 2024 is off to a great start.  We are excited to announce the upcoming Spring 2024 UNC System Virtual Transfer Fair, January 30th – February 1st. Event registration is now open.

This UNC System Virtual Transfer Fair is designed to provide prospective transfer students and community college advisors the opportunity to gain transfer-specific information from each UNC System university as well as connect attendees directly with representatives from each institution. The event schedule is available now- we are excited to have 15 universities participating (5 on each day of the event)! We appreciate your help in advertising this event and look forward to a great fair designed to support transfer students across the state.

Special Note: This event is targeted at transfer students who have completed college coursework after high school graduation; admissions and advising information shared may not apply to Early College, Middle College, and other dual-enrolled high school students. 


Welding Grad Returns to PCC as Instructor

January 12, 2024

A former student is now one of the instructors in Pamlico Community College’s Welding program.

Brittany Wolf, who earned her associate degree in Welding Technology from the college in 2018, has returned to campus as one of the program’s two full-time instructors.

She started working at the college in October and began her first full semester earlier this month.

Before returning to PCC, Wolf worked as a welder at two private sector companies. She said the thought of teaching at her alma mater appealed to her from the moment she was made aware of the possibility.

“(Instructor) Joe (Flynn) called and said they had an opening,” Wolf said. “I thought I’d apply and give it a try.”

Welding is one of the college’s most versatile learning options. Students can earn curriculum certificates, diplomas, or an associate degree in the program, or, if they’re not interested in a credential, they can choose to take the short-term Welding Skills course through the college’s Continuing Education division and learn the basics.

Wolf, whose father is a professional welder, said she was attracted to the field because of its job prospects and pay.

“It’s fun, and I wanted something different than minimum wage fast food,” she said, adding that the ability to join pieces of metal together opens up the possibilities of building interesting things and being creative.

Even though the welding workforce has become more diverse in recent years, Wolf said she still has encountered a few men who say they don’t think women should work in the field.

“It’s water off a duck’s back to me,” she said. “I just let my work talk for itself.”

Wolf also notes nearly half of her students last semester were female, which suggests the future for women in the field is bright.

Wolf will be teaching both curriculum and Continuing Education courses in the year ahead. For more information about the college’s Welding program, please call 252-249-1851, ext. 3058.


New Math Instructor Carries on Tradition

January 8, 2024

You might say Pamlico Community College’s new full-time mathematics instructor is carrying on the family business.

Meredith Glover, who started her new job at the college Jan. 2, grew up in a family of educators. Her mother is a retired high school math instructor and her father teaches economics at both Pitt Community College and Barton College.

Now the 26-year-old Morehead City woman is blazing her own trail as an educator. She joins the PCC faculty after three years as a math teacher at West Carteret High School and a previous two-year stint at Swansboro High School.

“I enjoy teaching the high-level math,” Glover said recently. “I’m looking forward to working with more mature students. I love teaching and seeing the light bulb go off for students.”

Glover replaces the late Paul Miller, a full-time PCC instructor who died during the Fall 2023 semester.

“I am aware of the situation,” she said. “I didn’t know him, but I want to do him justice. I want to do something he would look down and be proud of.”

Glover grew up in Wilson. She remembers being a good student in math.

“It was always my strong subject,” Glover said. “I like that it’s not subjective. With some thinking, things come together nicely and make sense.”

She graduated from Ralph L. Fike High School and enrolled at N.C. State University as an undecided major. Glover said she never intended to become an educator like her parents, but an experience in a math course at NCSU showed her she was a natural.

“It was a happy accident,” she said, explaining how she tutored a friend who was having trouble in the course.

“I found I really enjoyed it,” Glover said with a smile.

She went on to earn her bachelor’s degree in math education at State in 2019 and earned a master’s degree in math and statistics in 2023.

Glover taught her first two years in Onslow County. In a happy twist of fate, Glover ended up succeeding her mother at West Carteret High School.

“I literally took her room over,” she said. “She handed me the keys. It was the coolest thing.”

After five years of teaching high school, Glover decided to give college-level teaching a try.

“I feel Ms. Glover will be a welcomed addition to our strong group of PCC faculty,” said Instructor Neil Callahan, who also serves as the college’s chair of general studies, among other duties. “During her initial interview, her ability to teach mathematical concepts in a way anyone can understand really shined through. Her background as a high school teacher will highly benefit our Career & College Promise students who take her courses as well. We are lucky to have her aboard.”

In addition to her duties as a math instructor, Glover also will serve as the academic advisor for the college’s Associate of Science and Associate of General Education programs.

2023


PCC Participates in Christmas Parades

PCC Employees with parade float

December 12, 2023

More than 20 Pamlico Community College employees and family members represented the college in the Spirit of Christmas Parade on Dec. 9 in Oriental.

The college’s float featured giant gingerbread men, candy canes, lollipops, and candies. Brightly colored tinsel and wrapping paper completed the attractive entry.

Most PCC participants rode aboard the float or on the college’s pickup truck. A few, including Vice President of Student Services Jamie D. Gibbs, Instructor Zac Schnell, and Bookstore Manager Paula Meola, walked the parade route to hand out candy.

Special thanks go to Meola, Laura West, and everyone else who worked on the college’s float. Thanks also to everyone who donated candy for the event.

The college also planned to participate in the Pamlico County Christmas Parade in Bayboro on Dec. 16.


Electrical Tech Class Tries New Goggles

December 4, 2023

Students in Pamlico Community College’s Electrical Systems Technology program recently got to try out some virtual-reality and augmented-reality goggles in class and then were asked for their opinions about their effectiveness as teaching tools.

Yilei Huang, an associate professor in East Carolina University’s Department of Construction Management, brought the devices for class members to try. He then used a five-page survey to collect their thoughts on whether the goggles were helpful for lab exercises.

The students generally agreed the augmented-reality goggles were preferable to the virtual-reality versions, saying the virtual-reality goggles made some of them dizzy and disoriented.

“They’re very immersive, like being in another world,” said PCC Electrical Systems Technology Instructor Larry Monk, who also gave both kinds of goggles a try.

Huang had programmed the augmented-reality goggles to match the setup of an in-class electrical lab at PCC. He and an assistant from ECU recorded all of the class members’ input for use by the university.

It was great for PCC students to get a look at some of the most advanced teaching technology, PCC officials said. The exercise also will help the college continue to build partnerships with ECU and others, they said.

The college’s Electrical Systems Technology program trains students to install and maintain electrical and electronics systems found in homes, businesses, and industrial sites.

Coursework, most of which is hands-on, includes topics such as AC/DC theory, basic wiring practices, programmable logic controllers, industrial motor controls, applications of the National Electric Code, and other subjects.

Students can earn an Associate of Applied Science degree, and there are certificate options available.

Monk, a 2012 graduate of the program, is the lead instructor. For more information about PCC’s Electrical Systems Technology program, contact him at lmonk@pamlicocc.edu or 252-249-1851, ext. 3029.


PCC Medication Aide Course Now Scheduled

November 27, 2023

Pamlico Community College will offer its four-day Medication Aide course for current CNAs on Dec. 6, 7, 13, and 14.

Hours will be 9 a.m. to 3:30 p.m.

The cost is $70.55.

The course is designed for current CNAs who are ready to take on more responsibilities at work.

Interested? Contact Lori Giles at 252-249-1851, ext. 3015, or lgiles@pamlicocc.edu.


 

PCC Hosts Four-Year Colleges on Campus

November 20, 2023

Representatives of nine four-year colleges and universities visited PCC’s Johnson Building on Nov. 2 to meet with prospective transfer students and others.

The annual visit gives PCC students, area high schoolers, and others an opportunity to ask questions and weigh their options for transferring or enrolling at one of North Carolina’s four-year colleges and universities.

“It was an amazing day filled with conversations about careers and training pathways that start here at PCC and continue on to four-year schools throughout the state,” said PCC Counselor/Career Center Director Cristy Lewis Warner, who helped to host the visit. “It is always a day filled with information and exploration. The ability to ask questions large and small to these four-year schools and to get one-on-one answers directly from their staff is a powerful tool of connection.”

The participating institutions were Campbell University, East Carolina University, N.C. State University, N.C. Wesleyan University, Northeastern University-Charlotte, Salem College, UNC Wilmington, Western Carolina University, and Western Governors University.

Representatives set up displays at tables in the Johnson Building. They shared literature and fun giveaway items, answered questions, and gave area students a glimpse at what’s possible.

“To meet these four-year colleges face to face here in our community opens the door of communication for our students to learn more about the multitude of possibilities that exist for their futures,” Warner said. “It was encouraging to see so many middle and high school students explore their future education options, too.”

 


 

College Receives More National Recognitions

Pamlico Community College was recently nationally ranked as one of America’s very best community colleges for 2023 by national firm SmartAsset. Additionally, in a national ranking by the national website WalletHub, PCC has also been ranked as a top 10 national leader for 2023 among community colleges throughout the nation in student success.

SmartAsset, a New York-based personal finance technology company, recently analyzed federal data for more than 800 community colleges across America. Based on this analysis, SmartAsset highly ranked Pamlico Community College in its national report titled “Best Community Colleges for 2023”.

Of the 845 colleges SmartAsset analyzed, PCC is ranked at No. 12 on its list of America’s best community colleges for 2023. PCC President Dr. Jim Ross enthusiastically praised the “amazing PCC faculty and staff as the reason for this elite ranking.”

In addition, WalletHub, a personal finance website, recently once again ranked PCC among the top 10 community colleges in America for student educational outcomes.

“PCC faculty and staff serve with their hearts and truly want to make students’ lives better,” said Ross, “and this is seen in the elite ranking as No. 6 among community colleges throughout our nation in student educational outcomes.”

These national rankings, which were based on a review of federal education data and other materials, follow a strong string of national honors and recognitions Pamlico Community College has received in recent years.

Ross said, “These recognitions demonstrate how effective our faculty and staff are at helping students achieve their academic dreams so they can improve their lives and the lives of their families. It is an honor to work with these fantastic professionals.”

According to its report, SmartAsset analyzed data for 845 two-year colleges, ranking them based on their student-to-faculty ratios, retention rates and the cost of tuition and fees. Southeastern Community College in Whiteville took the top spot in Smart Asset’s analysis, and nine of the top 25 are from North Carolina. 

“North Carolina’s community college system is the best in America in my opinion,” Ross said. “It is a tremendous asset for our state’s overall economic health, and it is appropriate to see our community colleges across North Carolina recognized for their exceptional work.”

Pamlico Community College has now been ranked five times among SmartAsset’s top 25 community colleges in the past seven years. 

Meanwhile, WalletHub has once again ranked PCC in its top 10 community colleges nationally for students’ Educational Outcomes. This is the third time PCC has been ranked in the top 10 in the past four years. 

According to the methodology it posted online, WalletHub determined its Educational Outcomes rankings by scoring 668 colleges on these factors: first-year retention rate; graduation rate; transfer-out rate; degree and certificates awarded per 100 full-time-equivalent students; student-faculty ratio; share of full-time faculty; presence of special learning opportunities such as dual enrollment or distance education programs; and credit for life experiences. 

Southern Arkansas University Tech took the top spot in students’ Educational Outcomes, according to WalletHub.

In addition to its rankings by SmartAsset and WalletHub, PCC’s string of national recognitions has included a No. 1 ranking by Best Value Schools on its list of Best Community Colleges in North Carolina in 2021 and a designation as North Carolina’s best online community college for 2020 by Affordable Colleges Online (AC Online).

“I thank God for the remarkable blessings He has provided our college so that our caring employees can make lives better in Pamlico County, this wonderful community we proudly serve,” Ross said.

 


 State Funding Secured for New Health Center

 

Dr. Ross and Karen Standen standing in front of PCC sign

October 31, 2023

 

Persistent efforts of Pamlico Community College President Dr. Jim Ross to aggressively seek funds from the state legislature throughout this past year to begin a nursing program and multiple other in-demand allied health careers have proven remarkably successful. PCC has received a $20 million state appropriation from the General Assembly to build an Allied Health Center in Bayboro. This appropriation, by far the largest in PCC history, will enable the college to add multiple health care programs in high-demand, high-paying career fields, with nursing as its top priority to serve the community for decades to come.

Dr. Ross, who almost continually advocated with legislators for the funding, said the new facility will improve the lives of countless area residents while giving them hope for a brighter future.

“This is a fantastic blessing for the people of our community,” he said. “Our college’s primary focus with this historic funding is making lives better in a monumental way. When completed, this center will be a beacon of hope for the next century for our community. Generations of local residents will benefit by being able to access top-notch training for in-demand jobs in health care.”

Dr. Ross continued, “We thank our great friend Sen. Norman Sanderson for sponsoring the legislation that led to the appropriation being included in the Senate budget. We also thank Rep. Keith Kidwell for his strong support. Most importantly, I thank God for this amazing blessing of a lifetime for our college and community.”

Initial plans call for locating the center on college-owned acreage located beside the Mattocks Center in Bayboro. Dr. Ross said PCC will take its time to achieve excellence with this project and with the many programs that will be created.

“We’re going to take a very thoughtful and visionary approach,” he said. “We want to be imaginative and listen to all opinions on what is needed most. There are so many programs needed it will be a challenging task to narrow it down. We will be conducting additional community needs assessments and discussing options with colleagues at other colleges who have developed similar facilities.”

During Dr. Ross’s presidency, PCC has made adding Allied Health program offerings a key priority. The college has added several short-term health care programs through its Continuing Education division, including Cardiac Monitor Technician, Dialysis Technician, Medical Billing and Coding, Pharmacy Technician, Phlebotomy Technician, Physical Therapy Aide, and others.

Additionally, PCC offers curriculum programs in Medical Assisting and Dental Laboratory Technology, as well as emergency medical responder courses.

However, Pamlico is one of only two community colleges in North Carolina without an Associate Degree in Nursing program (Martin Community College in Williamston is the other), which is something Dr. Ross and other college leaders began vigorously to address in 2017.

To that end, the college employed local nurse Karen Standen to begin investigating the feasibility of launching a nursing program at PCC. To ensure the program could function effectively and that its students could complete clinical work, Standen began establishing relationships with the area medical community.

Then came COVID-19. With greatly reduced funding available, the pandemic halted work on a possible nursing program and limited the college’s ability to explore other healthcare curriculum options. When Dr. Ross said goodbye to Standen at that time, he startled her with his optimism by vowing to call her in the foreseeable future and resuming the college’s pursuit of a nursing program until the goal is achieved.

Dr. Ross remained resolute, and this year, with help from area legislators, began pushing for state funding of an Allied Health Center that could house college healthcare programs, including nursing. With the funding secured in the state budget, the president reached out to Standen to restart the effort to bring a nursing program to Pamlico County.

“It was with great pleasure that I called Karen and asked her if she was still interested in nursing and expanded allied health programs,” Dr. Ross said. “Her response to me was, ‘That would be amazing.’”

Standen is now working in a consulting role.

“Karen Standen is extremely intelligent, hard-working, results-oriented, a great researcher, and absolutely driven to achieve the best allied health programs possible for our community’s citizens. She will be working closely with Vice President Michelle Willis and me in researching the possible programs. Our vision is that students can get good-paying jobs in health care within driving distance of Pamlico County and then return in the evenings to this beautiful community to raise their families,” Dr. Ross said.

Dr. Ross also has met in recent weeks with retired Randolph Community College President Dr. Bob Shackleford to get his insights. Randolph built a similar Allied Health Center – now named for Shackleford – recently.

In addition to the possible nursing program, PCC’s new Allied Health Center will have space for other “feeder” programs, such as Radiography, Respiratory Care, and others, Dr. Ross said.

Meanwhile, the college’s current array of short-term Continuing Education health care programs likely will remain headquartered at the Grantsboro campus. The renovation of a 2,000-square-foot space in the Johnson Building for those programs is now in the works, thanks to a $500,000 grant from the Golden LEAF Foundation. It allows the expansion of numerous existing Continuing Education offerings and the introduction of others.

Dr. Ross said the Bayboro site for the new Allied Health Center is absolutely ideal because it’s centrally located and easily accessible. He also said its location near the current Pamlico County High School – and the future one – is also helpful.

The president said community residents will be kept informed as the project develops, and he added many will be asked to provide their input on the plans.

“We want this facility to be here to profoundly benefit our students, our college, and our community for a century to come,” Dr. Ross said. “It’s a win-win-win.”

 


 

College Mourns Sudden Passing of Instructor

October 9, 2023

 

The college community is mourning the death of Mathematics Instructor Paul Miller, who died Saturday, Oct. 7, 2023, after suffering a heart attack. He was a retired U.S. Marine and a native of Florida.

In an email to colleagues, Pamlico Community College President Dr. Jim Ross wrote, “He was an extremely dedicated and talented full-time Math instructor who cared deeply about his students. He was highly-respected by his students and his peers. Most importantly, he was a very good and decent human being striving constantly to make a difference in students’ lives. He made a great difference at our college, and he will be missed.”

The president continued, “I had the opportunity to frequently say hello to Paul and ask how things were going. He always lit up and told me with enthusiasm his latest joys in teaching. It was just three weeks ago that he and I talked at length at his request about a serious issue his students were having with one of the publishing companies that resulted in his students not getting books in a timely manner. I was very impressed by the passion that he exhibited during our conversations and the e-mails he copied me on as he led this battle. He was a warrior for our students in taking on this publisher and in the end his efforts brought success for our students. This is just one of a multitude of ways Paul’s students benefitted because of him.”

Ross added, “I called Paul’s wife Jennifer tonight (Saturday) at her request. She displayed amazing caring, love, and poise as we talked. She uplifted my spirit by caring so incredibly much for Paul’s students that this was her purpose for her wish to talk to me. In the midst of her shock and grief, it struck me that her heart was filled with such deep concern for Paul’s students who would expect to be taught on Monday morning. I was so thankful to her for allowing me to talk to her at such an important moment of her life so I could tell her how highly we thought of her husband. I told her I considered him not only an outstanding instructor but also a warrior for his students. I told Mrs. Miller how terribly sorry I am for her loss and asked her to let me know if I could help in any way, even if it was just by listening if she ever needed someone to talk to. She told me she will let us know when funeral services will be held. At that point, we will let you know about this.”

He concluded, “As I end this difficult to write e-mail, may I ask you, if you are so inclined, to join me in praying for Paul, for Mrs. Miller, and for all his loved ones? Faith and prayers for God’s blessings are never more important in my opinion and experience than at a time such as this. May I also respectfully suggest that you go to your own loved ones and give each of them an especially loving hug and tell them how much you appreciate them, how much you love them, and how much you treasure them in your life. We have a limited time in this miracle we call life to do so. None of us know when our lives or our loved ones’ lives will end. We do know, though, that they will end. Please don’t miss the chance to have the most important conversation you will ever have with those you love the most. Please let them know how you truly and deeply feel. May God bless you and all you love now and always.”

 


Tyndall Sisters Find Their Career Passions

 

October 9, 2023

 

Two Grantsboro sisters have already gotten head starts on great hands-on careers as teenagers by taking tuition-free courses through the N.C. Career & College Promise (CCP) program at Pamlico Community College.

Both 18-year-old Haley Tyndall and her 17-year-old sister, Autumn Tyndall, say the CCP courses, which are available to high school juniors and seniors, gave them experience in their chosen occupations while they were still high schoolers at Pamlico Christian Academy.

“They definitely have given us a head start,” said Autumn Tyndall, a PCA senior who is studying Cosmetology at PCC.

Her older-by-20-months sister, Haley, got her start in PCC’s Welding program while still at PCA. Now a high school graduate, she is on track to complete an Associate in Applied Science degree in Welding in 2025. In fact, she has nearly enough credits for an Associate in Arts degree from PCC in 2024!

“The Tyndall sisters illustrate that our Career & College Promise courses are not just for students who plan to go on to a university. They are also for young men and women who want to learn the skills they need to work with their hands and make a good living,” said PCC President Dr. Jim Ross. “Both of these young women will be prepared for the workplace as teenagers. We can’t wait to see what they accomplish.”

PCC has enrolled a record number of students in its CCP courses this semester. The program enables high school juniors and seniors to take college-level university transfer and career courses free of charge.

By enrolling and passing CCP courses, students can get a tremendous head start toward completing a four-year degree or starting a career. They also can save thousands of dollars.

The program is open to students at Pamlico County High School, Arapahoe Charter School, Pamlico Christian Academy or a home school.

Haley Tyndall initially planned to become a law enforcement officer, but, at the suggestion of PCC advisors, enrolled in the college’s Welding program instead. She discovered a passion for welding, which she plans to pursue as a career.

“I knew I wanted to do something hands-on,” she said. “I’m glad I took Welding. You can be kinda creative with it.”

Meanwhile, Autumn Tyndall said she chose to enroll in CCP Cosmetology courses after developing an interest in styling hair. Now 17, she is on track to earn both her high school diploma from Pamlico Christian Academy and her Cosmetology diploma from Pamlico Community College in early 2024.

She plans to work in a salon after graduation to build a clientele, then open her own shop.

Haley Tyndall hopes to find work at Cherry Point, and she might eventually open her own small business.

“Both Haley and Autumn are hard workers, so I know they’ll do well with the careers they’ve chosen,” said Derek Godwin, who oversees the college’s CCP program. “Whether students want to pursue a university degree or get started on a career, we can help.”

Ross added, “I’ve often said CCP courses are the best value I’ve encountered during my career in higher education. I urge high school students and their parents to explore the opportunities available right here in Pamlico County.”

For more information about CCP courses, please contact Derek Godwin at 252-249-1851, ext. 3106, or dgodwin@pamlicocc.edu.

 


October Will Feature New Slate of Courses

 

September 29, 2023

 

Pamlico Community College plans to launch a fresh slate of short-term courses in October that can help men and women enhance their job skills, explore new careers and enter the local workforce.

These courses are open to adult learners. Financial aid is available for qualified students.

“As a college, we have made a commitment to growing our lineup of short-term training programs for men and women who are interested in high-demand career fields or who want to become more valuable in their current jobs,” said PCC President Dr. Jim Ross. “One of the greatest features of these Continuing Education courses is that they start at different times throughout the year, which means our college always has something new to offer students. These programs vary from hands-on courses to others than can be completed online.”

October’s schedule will include:

 

* Grant Writing, which will be offered in a Zoom-based format. It will meet Tuesdays and Thursdays from Oct. 3 to Nov. 9. Hours will be 6:30 to 8 p.m. Cost is $70.

 

* Smartphones and Tablets: iPhones, a course designed to help men and women operate their Apple devices. It’s scheduled to begin Oct. 6 and run through Nov. 10. It will meet Fridays from 1 to 3 p.m.

 

* Dialysis Technician, an evening course starting Oct. 9. It will meet from 5:30 to 9:30 p.m. Mondays and Wednesdays through Feb. 26, 2024. Cost is $180.

 

* Effective Teacher Training, a 30-hour online course that’s scheduled to start Oct. 16. Cost is $125.

 

* Medication Aide, a four-day course scheduled to start Oct. 19. Cost is $70.

 

* Forklift Training, a one-day training set for Oct. 21. Participants also will learn to use a power pallet jack. Hours are 8 a.m. to 5 p.m. Cost is $70.

 

* ServSafe, a one-day training set for Oct. 23. It will meet from 9 a.m. to 7 p.m. Cost is $70.

 

* Community Health Worker, a hybrid course scheduled to start Oct. 24. It will run through Dec. 14. Cost is $180.

 

* Notary, a one-day class scheduled for Oct. 28 in Bayboro. It will meet from 8:30 a.m. to 4:30 p.m. Cost is $70, plus a book.

 

For more information about these programs or to register, visit the Continuing Education webpage at http://www.pamlicocc.edu/programs-continuing.php, contact the college at 252-249-1851, ext. 3015, or email lgiles@pamlicocc.edu.

 


Grant Writing Course Features Zoom Format

September 18, 2023

Pamlico Community College can train men and women to secure the funding their organizations need to make a difference in the community.  The college has scheduled a virtual Grant Writing course for this fall. It will be offered in a Zoom-based format and will meet Tuesdays and Thursdays from Oct. 3 to Nov. 9.

Cost is $70. The instructor will be professional grant writer Monica Minus.

“Securing funding from public and private sources is critical for non-profits and other community organizations,” said PCC President Dr. Jim Ross.

“This course is designed to equip students with the skills they need to create successful grant applications. It will be a great course for anyone who is interested in accessing funding for great community causes.” In years past, the Grant Writing course has been offered Saturdays. This semester, college officials are experimenting with scheduling classes on Tuesdays and Thursdays from 6:30 to 8 p.m. to see if those hours better meet the needs of participants.

“We talked about developing a schedule that doesn’t take up all of the participants’ Saturdays,” said Lori Giles, the college’s chair of Continuing Education and technical programs.

“This semester’s Grant Writing course will be available during the workweek, which might be a better option for working adults. We are eager to receive input on this decision.”

The course will include information on finding funding sources, writing narratives and developing budgets. The course’s Zoom-based online format will save participants on transportation costs, organizers say.

“The non-profit sector is vital to the well-being of any thriving community, and we are honored to offer this course to help organizations succeed,” Ross said. “There is funding out there to help. This course will help your organization secure it.”

For more information or to register for either course, call 252-249-1851, ext. 3015, or email lgiles@pamlicocc.edu.

 


Continuing Education Plans Busy September

August 29, 2023

While the Fall 2023 registration period for seated and online full-term curriculum courses at Pamlico Community College has passed, there are plenty of other opportunities available this semester to enhance your job skills, explore new careers and enter the workforce.

The college plans to launch a fresh slate of short-term Continuing Education courses in health care, education, diesel mechanics and other workplace skills in September. These courses are open to adult learners. Financial aid is available for qualified students.

“Our college continues to add new vocational programs for our community to train residents for good-paying jobs that are in-demand by regional employers,” said PCC President Dr. Jim Ross.

“The PCC Continuing Education division is already off to a strong start this semester, and there’s more to come in September and in the months ahead. We have a wonderful lineup of programs scheduled for men and women who are interested in high-demand career fields or who want to become more valuable in their current jobs. The programs vary from hands-on courses to others than can be completed online.”

September’s schedule will include:

* Phlebotomy Technician, a daytime seated class starting Sept. 5. It will meet Tuesdays and Thursdays from 8:30 a.m. to 4 p.m. through Jan. 31, 2024. Cost is $180.

 

* Community Health Worker, a web-based course scheduled to start Sept. 5. It will meet from 10 a.m. to 2 p.m. Tuesdays through December. Cost is $180.

 

* Nurse Aide II, a daytime hybrid course starting Sept. 6. It will meet from 8:30 a.m. to 4 p.m. Tuesdays and Thursdays through Nov. 29. Cost is $180.

 

* Dental Billing and Coding, which is a two-part, online program starting Sept. 11. Each part costs $180.

 

* Effective Teacher Training, a 30-hour online course that’s scheduled to start Sept. 11 and end in October. Cost is $125.

 

* Marine Diesel Engines for Boaters, an evening seated course for boat owners and hobbyists that’s scheduled to start Sept. 11 and end Oct. 19. Classes will meet Mondays and Thursdays. Hours are 5 to 7 p.m. Cost is $125.

 

* Medical Office Procedures, an online course that will begin Sept. 11 and will end Jan. 26, 2024. Cost is $180.

 

* Starting Your Garden Off Right, an evening seated course that will begin Sept. 11. It will meet Mondays from 5 to 8 p.m. through Oct. 16. Cost is $70.

 

* Marine Diesel Engines for Job-Seekers, a seated course for men and women interested in a career in marine diesel engines. This course, which has a different focus than the Marine Diesel Engines for Boaters version, is scheduled to start Sept. 12 and end in October. Classes will meet Tuesdays. Hours are 5 to 8 p.m. Cost is $70.

 

* Medication Aide, a daytime seated course for current CNAs starting Sept. 14. It will meet from 9 a.m. to 3:30 p.m. Thursdays and Fridays through Sept. 22. Cost is $70.

 

* Medical Terminology, Billing and Coding, a three-part series of online courses that will begin Sept. 21. Cost is $180 per part.

 

* Forklift Training, a one-day training set for Sept. 23. Participants also will learn to use a power pallet jack. Hours are 8 a.m. to 5 p.m. Cost is $70.

 

* Notary, a one-day class scheduled for Sept. 30 in Bayboro. It will meet from 8:30 a.m. to 4:30 p.m. Cost is $70, plus a book.

More great courses are set for October!

For more information about these programs or to register, visit the Continuing Education webpage at http://www.pamlicocc.edu/programs-continuing.php, contact the college at 252-249-1851, ext. 3015, or email:lgiles@pamlicocc.edu.

 


President Encourages CCP Enrollment at PCC

August 21, 2023

Dear Pamlico County Parents,

As President of Pamlico Community College, I wish to let you and other parents of high school students know about the greatest value I have found in higher education. As your child is working with you to develop their high school class schedule for the fall, please consider an opportunity for them to take PCC college courses while still attending high school and earn full college credits without paying even one penny in tuition!

This program enables high school juniors and seniors to soon sign up to take our college classes this fall with no tuition charge. It is called the North Carolina Career & College Promise (CCP) program. Through this your child can earn most, or even all, of an associate degree from our college by the time he or she graduates from high school…and never pay a penny in tuition!

This program can give them a huge head start toward completing their bachelor’s degree by transferring the credits earned tuition-free at PCC to the university of their choice to complete the bachelor’s degree. By doing so, they can save your family tens of thousands of dollars that you would have spent for tuition!

Martin Guion, who works in the PCC Computer Services department, had his family save nearly $50,000 in tuition through this program! His three daughters took CCP courses as high school juniors and seniors and earned 45, 35, and 48 credit hours, respectively, and transferred those credits to Liberty University. Tuition for those credits would have cost nearly $50,000 at Liberty, without room and board! The daughters also saved a great deal of time. In fact, the youngest daughter earned her bachelor’s degree from Liberty at age 20.

When Riley Callahan graduated from Pamlico County High School, he took with him 50 hours of college credit to East Carolina University. His 50 hours of college credit equal a year and a half of college coursework. At ECU this would run about $11,000, without including room and board. “Take advantage of these classes,” Riley said. “They’re free and they’ll get you a head start on your future. It’s a great opportunity.”

Our program is open to local qualified students with good grades from Pamlico County High School, Arapahoe Charter School, Pamlico Christian Academy, or a home school program. I strongly encourage high school juniors and seniors to explore taking our CCP courses. These can help our local students get a college education without going deeply in debt and to get ahead fast. Please talk to your children about this.

There is truly no better bargain in higher education that I know of than tuition-free, transferable college credits. As the community college serving this wonderful community, it would give all of us here great satisfaction to know you have saved a great deal of money by taking part in this amazing opportunity.

By taking CCP classes, your child can earn PCC college credits that can be applied to an Associate in Arts degree or an Associate in Science degree that can then transfer to all state public and many private universities. Students can also earn credits in the many vocational and technical career pathways we offer.

Registration for the Fall semester is now open! Please have your child contact his or her high school guidance counselor, or contact CCP Director Derek Godwin at 252-249-1851, extension 3106, or at dgodwin@pamlicocc.eduRegistration will take place August 28 and 29 from 8 am to 3 pm at the college’s Mattocks Center in Bayboro. Please tell your loved ones about these dates!

Pamlico Community College is honored to be ranked this past year as the Number 1 community college in our nation for student success. This national ranking is from WalletHub after analyzing federal data from hundreds of outstanding community colleges across our nation. It is the second time in the past three years PCC was ranked Number 1 in the USA. This humbling honor is because of our amazing faculty and staff.

I thank God for the opportunity to serve as President the past seven years, to work with such caring and dedicated professionals, to serve such a wonderful community, and to achieve success for our students. I ask God to provide us favor as my colleagues and I seek more bold and noble goals to change many more lives.

Please contact me at jross@pamlicocc.edu or call 252-249-1851, ext. 3007, if I can ever help you in any way. Thank you for what you do as a parent, which I believe is the most important job in the world.

I wish your child a successful, safe, and healthy 2023-24 school year!

Take care,

Dr. Jim Ross

President of Pamlico Community College

 


Cosmetology Welcomes Back a Familiar Face

August 14, 2023

Pamlico Community College’s newest Cosmetology instructor wants to give back to the community by training students to help area residents look and feel their best.

Elethia Williams, a Beaufort County woman who grew up in Pamlico County and graduated in 2001 from Pamlico County High School, started her new job earlier this month.

She will teach the beginner Cosmetology courses while Instructor Debi Fulcher will handle the advanced courses. Williams replaces Instructor Christy Laney, who left the area.

Williams is eager to get started.

“I wanted to give back to the community,” she said. “I also want to instill the love of Cosmetology in students. I love Cosmetology. I love everything about it. I like all things beautiful.”

PCC President Dr. Jim Ross said the college is pleased to have Williams on board in time for the start of the Fall 2023 semester.

“Elethia Williams is a fantastic addition to our college, and we are pleased to have her with us,” he said. “She brings with her plenty of experience as an instructor and a business owner, and I know she will do an outstanding job.”

Williams, whose extended family still lives in the Vandemere area, said she first took an interest in Cosmetology as a middle schooler. She remembers styling her dolls’ hair, and then later being asked frequently by classmates to do their hair and makeup.

“It chose me,” she said with a smile. “I had a talent for it. My favorite thing to do is makeup.”

Williams was active at PCHS. She was a cheerleader, ran track and was a student government leader. After high school, she considered a military career, but then enrolled at PCC to study Cosmetology. She was among the first students to take courses in the then-new Cosmetology building in Bayboro in 2004.

Williams finished her training at Beaufort County Community College. She would go on to teach at both BCCC and as a substitute at PCC.

Williams also opened and operated a salon in Washington, first on a large scale and later in a smaller space downtown. The salon, named Hair Brows Makeup & Things Beauty Salon, sees clients by appointment, but will occasionally take walk-ins, she said.

Williams said a key step in training beginning cosmetologists is to help them get rid of their old habits and amateur ways and instead learn the proper skills and techniques used in the industry. Learning the basics and then honing their skills is a great way to start a rewarding career, she said.

“We teach them the basics,” Williams said. “It’s a learned skill. They can do it, but it takes work.”

On a personal note, Williams is engaged and has three children. She is planning a wedding in 2024, which, of course, will demand the use of her skills in hair and makeup.

In the meantime, Williams is gearing up for the new academic year at Pamlico.

“I’m excited to be back,” she said.

For more information about the college’s Cosmetology and Esthetics programs, including how to enroll, please call 252-249-1851, ext. 3130.

 


PCC Mourns the Passing of Michelle Noevere

August 11, 2023

Michelle Noevere, executive assistant to Pamlico Community College President Dr. Jim Ross and executive director of the PCC Foundation, died Monday, Aug. 7, 2023, after a courageous battle with cancer.

She grew up in Texas and was a graduate of PCC. Michelle had been named the college’s 2022-23 Staff Member of the Year in May.

In an all-employee email announcing Michelle’s passing to colleagues, Dr. Ross wrote:

Heaven has a new angel in it this morning.

I just received word that our beloved Michelle Noevere has passed away.

May God welcome our treasured colleague and dear friend to Heaven with open, comforting, and loving arms. May Michelle know how very much we all care about her, love her, and already deeply miss her.

Thank you so much to each of you who made her time with our college so joyous for her. She told me so many times how very much she enjoyed every day of working at PCC. What a blessing she was for our college for her amazing professional contributions but also because she was such an amazing, caring human being.

Her work for our college was incredible every single day of her employment. This was the case even as she fought heroically against cancer. She was incredibly positive and uplifting to others even in her most challenging days in fighting cancer.

Those of us who were allowed by God to know her during her life on earth have been made much better people because of being touched by her.

In fact, our lives will always be much better in the future because we have been blessed by knowing Michelle.

In a spirit of sincere appreciation, we thank God for allowing us to know Michelle. We thank Him for allowing our world to have this angel amidst us. She made our college so much better and made our world so much better.

It is now time for Heaven to welcome its newest angel.

May God be with all her family members now and always.

May God be with you— her treasured PCC family members— and your loved ones now and always.

Michelle, we love you now and always,

Jim Ross

A link to Michelle’s obituary

 


Fall Registration Now Underway at Pamlico

August 8, 2023

Registration for the Fall 2023 semester is underway at Pamlico Community College!

Faculty members and Student Services staffers are meeting with new and returning students this week to sign them up for curriculum courses, give them information about financial aid opportunities and provide them with advice and suggestions about their educational options.

However, if you are unable to get to campus this week, you’ll still be able to sign up for curriculum courses in the days ahead so you can get started on your academic journey this semester.

Seated courses will begin Aug. 14. Online classes will start Aug. 30.

Looking ahead, registration for Career & College Promise courses for high school juniors and seniors is scheduled for Aug. 28 and 29 from 8 a.m. to 3 p.m. at the Mattocks Center in Bayboro.

“Registration is a very exciting and optimistic time at Pamlico Community College,” said PCC President Dr. Jim Ross. “We want to make the registration process positive and convenient. We know many of our students have other responsibilities and demands on their time. That’s why we try to be flexible with people and treat them with respect and compassion.”

A friendly, supportive atmosphere is what new and returning students can expect to find at the college. WalletHub has ranked Pamlico the No. 1 community college in America for student success, and the college’s faculty and staff are here to help men and women reach their educational goals for Fall 2023 and beyond.

“Pamlico Community College offers a nationally recognized education, but we also offer a welcoming environment for students,” Ross said. “We invite area residents to check out what we have to offer for the Fall 2023 semester and to join us for the new academic year.”

For more information about registration, including financial aid and course selection, email studentservices@pamlicocc.edu, call 252-249-1851, ext. 3001, or visit Student Services in the Johnson Building on campus.

 


Seniors Eligible for Free Computer Class

July 18, 2023

There’s still time for adults ages 65 and older to enroll in Pamlico Community College’s free Basic Computers for Seniors course. Two sections of the popular course will begin in August.

The course, which is offered at the college’s Grantsboro campus, teaches senior adults the basics of operating a computer, including how to send emails, use the Internet and navigate software programs.

One session will begin Tuesday, Aug. 8, and will run through Dec. 5. It will meet from 9 a.m. to noon on Tuesdays.

A second session will start for Thursday, Aug. 17, and will run through Jan. 4, 2024. It will meet from 9 a.m. to noon on Thursdays.

PCC is able to offer this course to men and women 65 and older at no charge through an ongoing partnership with Agape Love in Action, Inc., which is an organization led by Corliss Udoema.

“We are proud of this course and of our partnership with Agape Love in Action,” said PCC President Dr. Jim Ross. “PCC is a place for everyone to learn something new. I encourage senior adults to check out this course.”

PCC Chair of Continuing Education and Technical Programs Lori Giles said the course helps to demystify computers and the Internet for men and women who have not had experience with them.

“It’s exciting to see people who never thought they’d be able to use a computer to do so and to be comfortable with it,” she said. “The classes have a relaxed atmosphere, and participants have a great time.”

Students younger than 65 also can enroll in the course, but must pay the $70 fee.

For more information about the course or to register, please call 252-249-1851, ext. 3015.

 


PCC Helps Students Secure Financial Aid

June 26, 2023

The time between the end of the previous academic year and the start of the Fall 2023 semester is a great time for new and returning students to make sure they have the financial aid they need to enroll in courses at Pamlico Community College.

In other words, that time is now!

Director of Financial Aid Gretchen Steiger and the college’s Student Services staff are available to help men and women complete the enrollment process before the Registration rush in August.

That process includes helping students find and secure the financial help they need.

“Pamlico Community College is blessed to be able to offer financial aid from a number of sources, including federal funds, state grants and local scholarships,” said PCC President Dr. Jim Ross. “Don’t let a lack of financial resources stop you from reaching your educational goals. I would urge anyone who is considering enrolling in college for the upcoming Fall 2023 semester to contact us as soon as possible to see how we can help.”

Financial aid sources include Pell grants, Federal Supplemental Education Opportunity grants, Federal Work-Study programs, Workforce Innovation and Opportunity Act (WIOA) funds and state grants. Additionally, the college has several local and institutional scholarships available for students who qualify, thanks to generous donors to the Pamlico Community College Foundation.

To determine your eligibility for many of these options, you will need to complete a Free Application for Federal Student Aid (FAFSA) form. The FAFSA is available at www.studentaid.gov.

PCC also is able to certify for VA Education Benefits. Only eligible veterans, dependents or active duty service members who have obtained eligibility with VA (or have received advance approval from their ESO or service if using Tuition Assistance) can utilize VA Education Benefits.

“The college has several financial aid opportunities and resources available to assist students in achieving their educational goals,” Steiger said. “Students can find information about these in the Financial Aid section of the college’s website at www.pamlicocc.edu.”

She continued, “To ensure consideration for scholarships and other awards, students should complete their 2023-24 FAFSA and turn in any other required documents by Aug. 9. Students can reach out to me to set up an appointment for assistance or with any questions about available opportunities at gsteiger@pamlicocc.edu or 252-249-1851, ext. 3026.”

Ross said the college is a great place for men and women to secure the education they need to improve their lives.

“Pamlico Community College is a wonderful place to discover a great career field or to get started on earning a four-year degree,” Ross said. “We are honored to be recognized as the top community college in America for student success, based on U.S. Department of Education data, and our tuition and fees are far lower than public or private universities. Contact the college today to see how we can match you with the resources you need to achieve your goals and dreams!”

 


Continuing Education Offers Summer Courses

June 12, 2023

Pamlico Community College’s Continuing Education division is staying busy this Summer with a slate of short-term, hands-on training courses designed to help men and women enhance their job prospects, become more valuable in their current posts and develop more self-reliance.

The courses include popular offerings in health care as well as hands-on classes in diesel mechanics and forklift training.

Two new sections of PCC’s popular Basic Computers for Seniors are also on tap.

“Staffers in our Continuing Education division are always looking to meet the needs of area employers and the community,” said PCC President Dr. Jim Ross. “They stay flexible, which makes them able to set up short-term training courses quickly to meet emerging trends. I encourage residents to see what we’re offering in the weeks ahead.”

Upcoming courses include:

 

* Marine Diesel for Boaters and Marine Diesel for Job-Seekers, which are scheduled to begin in July.

Instructor Stanley Feigenbaum of Pamlico County has created one course specifically for boat owners who wish to learn more about maintaining their vessels’ diesel engines. It is scheduled to begin Monday, July 10.

Feigenbaum also has created a separate course for men and women who are interested in maintaining marine diesel engines as a career. That course is scheduled to begin Tuesday, July 11.

 

* Forklift Training, a one-day class on Saturday, July 15, at the PCC campus in Grantsboro. Learn the basics of safely operating a forklift with this $70 course.

 

* Notary, a one-day course in Bayboro on Saturday, July 29.

 

* Basic Computers for Seniors, PCC’s popular free course for adults ages 65 and older. There will be two sections of the course – one will begin Tuesday, Aug. 8, and the other will start Thursday, Aug. 17.

The course, which teach adults the basics of operating a computer, is available through an ongoing collaboration with Agape Love in Action, Inc.

* ServSafe, a one-day training for food service workers, on Monday, Aug. 14. It will meet from 9 a.m. to 7 p.m. Cost is $70.

 

* Medication Aide, a short-term course for current CNAs, starting Aug. 16.

 

* Electronic Health Records, an online course designed to train individuals to maintain electronic and printed medical records. It’s scheduled to begin Monday, Aug. 21. Cost is $180, plus a book.

* Medical Billing and Coding, a three-part online course designed to train entry-level medical billers and coders. The course starts Monday, Aug. 21. Each part costs $180, plus books.

 

* Nurse Aide I, an evening hybrid course starting Aug. 22.

 

* Pharmacy Technician, a hybrid course coming Aug. 24. Cost will be $180.

For more information about any of these courses or to register, please contact PCC’s Lori Giles at 252-249-1851, ext. 3015, or lgiles@pamlicocc.edu.

 


High-Achieving Stowe Wants to Help Others

June 5, 2023

Pamlico Community College graduate Mariah Stowe has the right prescription for success: Find something you want to do and then work as hard as you can to make it happen in short order.

That’s the way the 18-year-old Grantsboro woman has lived her young life, and it’s the right remedy to help her reach her goals of becoming a registered nurse and, eventually, a nurse practitioner.

The soft-spoken teenager, who recently earned her Associate in Arts degree with honors from PCC even before she graduates from Pamlico County High School, is the recipient of the college’s 2023 Academic Excellence Award and has been named PCC’s 2023 Student of the Year.

Stowe’s selection for the college’s top student prizes was announced during PCC’s 2023 Commencement ceremony May 12.

“I was definitely surprised,” she said with a chuckle.

For their part, instructors, friends and others who know Stowe say they weren’t surprised at all. Stowe has been taking on challenges and exceeding expectations for a while, they say.

“Mariah Stowe impresses me as someone who maximizes her time and looks for opportunities to excel,” said PCC President Dr. Jim Ross. “She has worked extremely hard in the tuition-free, college-level courses PCC offers high school juniors and seniors through the N.C. Career & College Promise program, and she has been rewarded by becoming one of six Class of 2023 PCHS seniors to receive their associate degrees during the same year they graduate from high school.”

The president continued, “She has the drive and determination she needs to succeed in her next challenge and beyond. All of us at PCC are very proud of Mariah and look forward to seeing what her bright future holds.”

Stowe grew up in Pamlico County and attended the county’s public schools. She has always done well in the classroom, even though high school algebra gave her a little trouble.

While attending Pamlico County High School, Stowe noticed how an older schoolmate, Sarah Henries, was able to take college-level courses from PCC and earn transferable college credits at no charge through the Career & College Promise (CCP) program.

“That was really what pushed me,” she said. “I was driven by her experiences and what I saw could happen, and then I saw myself in that place and how happy I would be.”

Encouraged by PCC Instructor Derek Godwin, who oversees the CCP program, and PCC Vice President of Instructional Services Michelle Willis, Stowe took on multiple college-level courses and thrived. She said her time in PCHS health science courses confirmed her desire to become a nurse, and the free college courses helped her complete prerequisite classes she would need.

Always looking to stay ahead, Stowe and a high school classmate took a Nurse Aide I course through the college’s Continuing Education division. Her experience in that course and its clinical component showed her she was on the right track.

“It’s definitely not for the weak,” she said. “But I was able to see through clinicals how much you can help people. It’s a good way to get out there and do your part.”

It’s important to Stowe that she do her part to help others. She said her younger brother’s experience with caring, compassionate health care providers showed her the difference individuals can make in the lives of a patient and his or her family – and that’s what she wants to do, too.

Godwin praised Stowe for her commitment to her studies and for her determination to succeed.

“Mariah’s remarkable accomplishment of receiving PCC’s Academic Excellence Award serves as a testament to her exceptional intellectual abilities, remarkable drive and unwavering commitment to academic excellence,” he said. “It has truly been an inspiration to watch her journey these past two years as a Career & College Promise student.”

During the May 12 Commencement ceremony, Vice President of Student Services Jamie Gibbs presented Stowe with a plaque and a medallion for her awards. As the recipient of the Academic Excellence Award, she became Pamlico’s 2023 honoree in the N.C. Community College System’s “Great within the 58” list of high-achieving students.

Stowe’s next stop will be Craven Community College in New Bern, where she has enrolled in the Associate Degree Nursing (ADN) program. Her classes will begin in August.

She has the support and guidance of her family, including her mother, who is a PCC graduate. Stowe also has the knowledge that she has a leg up on her future, thanks in large part to the CCP program.

“Mariah has a big head start on her goals, thanks to the Career & College Promise program,” Ross said. “I often say it’s the best bargain in higher education.”

For more information about how high school juniors and seniors can take college-level courses tuition-free through PCC, please contact Derek Godwin at 252-249-1851, ext. 3106, or dgodwin@pamlicocc.edu.

 


PCC Seeks to Build Ties with FRC East

May 22, 2023

Leaders from Pamlico Community College, Fleet Readiness Center East and the Pamlico County Schools met May 22 to discuss ways to build partnerships and to create training pathways that lead to good-paying jobs for local students and residents at nearby Cherry Point.

“Our college strongly believes in partnering and making our community better,” said PCC President Dr. Jim Ross as he welcomed FRC East officials and representatives of the local public schools to the Delamar Center and praised each organization for their contributions to making lives better. “This is an important issue for our college to enter into this partnership with you.”

Ross went on to acknowledge the importance of the exemplary partnerships PCC has with community businesses, organizations, and non-profits and how this has helped the college better serve the community.

“We are thankful for today’s meeting as a very positive step to preparing Pamlico County residents for good local careers at Fleet Readiness Center East,” he said.

Michelle Willis, the college’s vice president of instructional services, said PCC and FRC East formerly had an apprenticeship program for the college’s Electrical Systems Technology students. Reinvigorating that and other learning partnerships would benefit Pamlico County students and residents, she said.

“We look forward to finding out what we can do to help our students and our residents get the training they need to go to Cherry Point and work,” Willis said.

FRC East is based at Marine Corps Air Station Cherry Point in nearby Havelock. The facility employs about 4,000 people in the critical national security work of repairing and updating military aircraft.

Michelle Smith, STEM and Education Outreach Coordinator for FRC East, said she hoped the meeting would open lines of communication between FRC East, the college and the school system so new and productive partnerships could be explored.

“I’m a former teacher,” she said. “I want successful students.”

Following the initial session, FRC East representatives briefly toured the college’s facilities and heard from PCC officials about the programs and training courses available. The May 22 meeting had been organized after Smith and Willis struck up a conversation at a recent Career Fair at Pamlico County High School in Bayboro.

 


Graduation Ceremony Honors Class of 2023

May 15, 2023

Goals were accomplished, tassels were turned and new life adventures got underway during Pamlico Community College’s 56th Commencement Exercises Friday, May 12, at the Delamar Center.

The mood at the evening event was joyous, with hundreds of family members, friends and community leaders on hand to salute the graduates for their achievements.

“You did it, didn’t you? You did it!” PCC President Dr. Jim Ross told the graduates, many of whom achieved their educational goals while balancing family demands, work and other commitments. “We’re so proud of you.”

The president and others also congratulated the graduates’ family members and friends and thanked them for their encouragement and support.

Sixty of the 133 men and women who qualified for recognition over the last year in the college’s curriculum and Continuing Education programs took part in the ceremony. Overall, the Class of 2023 earned a combined 184 academic and Continuing Education credentials, including 37 associate degrees, 10 diplomas, 55 certificates and 82 Continuing Education recognitions.

Cecilia A. “Candy” Bohmert, current vice chair of the Pamlico County Board of Commissioners and a member of the college’s Board of Trustees, gave the Commencement address. A 1996 graduate of the college, she encouraged the graduates to remain optimistic and to be open to new learning opportunities.

“When I graduated, I was 40. You’re not done yet,” Bohmert said.

She urged the graduates to keep chasing their dreams, even if it takes a while. Bohmert recounted how she almost didn’t pursue a job with the local Soil and Water Conservation District, but was encouraged to go after it by her husband.

Bohmert got the job, and “for 20 years, I lived my dream,” she said.

“Don’t despise your small beginnings,” Bohmert told the graduates, urging them to remain open to new things, to accept help and to surround themselves with people who want to see them succeed.

With the right education, attitude and people around them, members of the PCC Class of 2023 can do anything, she said.

“Leadership is all about influence,” Bohmert said. “You can change things. Don’t limit yourself by saying you can’t.”

Later in the ceremony, the college honored Mariah Stowe as its Academic Excellence Award recipient and Student of the Year. The 18-year-old Stowe is a senior at Pamlico County High School. She earned an Associate in Arts degree from the college through the N.C. Career & College Promise program and also completed a PCC Nurse Aide I training course, all before she is scheduled to receive her high school diploma.

Stowe was one of six PCHS seniors who were recognized for earning their Associate in Arts degrees the same year they earn their high school diplomas.

PCC Electrical Systems Technology Instructor Larry Monk was honored as the college’s Alumnus of the Year. Monk graduated from the program he now leads. He also was recognized for his work as a foster parent and youth coach.

Following the award presentations, the graduates were called across the stage one-by-one to receive their credentials and to pose for a free photo with Ross.

PCC Instructor Ronald Scott announced the names. When the graduates had received their respective credentials, PCC Vice President of Instruction Michelle Willis-Krauss pronounced them graduated and instructed them to turn their tassels as the audience cheered.

This year’s graduates completed their studies in an academic year when PCC was recognized once again as America’s No. 1 community college for student success by WalletHub. The college has been honored with that title in two of the last three years.

PCC Trustee Ann Holton gave the welcome message at the ceremony, and pianist Paula Murray provided the music.

An outdoor reception with refreshments followed the ceremony. As in years past, a professional photographer was available to take free family portraits for the graduates and their loved ones.

 


PCC Awards Presented at Celebratory Lunch

May 11, 2023

PCC colleagues gathered in the Delamar Center Tuesday, May 9, to celebrate a year of multiple successes, to honor the college’s top employees for 2022-23 and to enjoy a delicious lunch.

In years past, most college awards for employees were presented at Commencement. In 2020 and 2021 during the worst of the COVID-19 pandemic, the presentations were online.

This year, the presentation of the annual awards was the centerpiece of an all-employee meeting designed for colleagues to look back on the academic year and to enjoy each other’s company.

“Today is going to be a day of celebration,” said PCC President Dr. Jim Ross shortly before introducing Community Living student Sarah Vieregge, who sang “The Star-Spangled Banner” to open the event.

In opening remarks, the president introduced Lee Tillman, who has been hired as the college’s new vice president of financial services, and he led employees in a raucous chant of “We are PCC!” as he spoke about the college’s mission to help men and women improve their lives.

The day’s first award – Instructor of the Year – went to Welding Instructor Joe Flynn. Ross said Flynn is known for his attention to detail, and he added Flynn does an outstanding job preparing students for real world workplaces.

“Our college is so much better because of you,” Ross said.

Flynn, whose wife, Tammy, was on hand for the event, joked the scoring used to select him must be incorrect as he thanked the group for the honor.

The Pamlico Correctional Institution Instructor of the Year Award went to Horticulture Instructor Ed King. He also received the honor in 2017.

“You never expect to get these things, but it’s nice when it comes from people you work with,” King said as he accepted the award.

This year’s Adjunct Instructor of the Year Award went to part-time English Instructor Brent Canle.

Ross officially notified Canle of his selection through an online video chat on Instructor Neil Callahan’s phone during the ceremony. The instructor said he enjoyed working with students.

Custodian Lana Green again was recognized for the President’s Award, which Ross first announced via an online video call from Texas last December.

“I’d like to thank God for this,” she said, adding it was an honor to be considered for the award.

Ross also announced a new award – the President’s Department of the Year Award – would go this year to Computer Services (IT). Like the President’s Award for an individual, the new honor recognizes departments that are positive, professional and productive.

The president confessed he had been worried about the department’s future following the retirement of Scott Frazer, but was exceedingly pleased with how the remaining teammates came together and carried on under the leadership of Martin Guion.

“They are a fantastic model for this college,” Ross said.

Joining Guion in receiving the departmental award were Gregory Davis, Nick Goodwin, Ya Min and Christy Wicks.

This year’s Staff Member of the Year Award went to Michelle Noevere, the president’s executive assistant and executive director of the PCC Foundation. She remains hospitalized in Chapel Hill following a stem cell treatment, but was able to participate in the ceremony via an online video chat.

“There’s no one in this nation that I would rather have in this role than Michelle,” Ross said.

For her part, Noevere thanked Ross for being a friendly and kind mentor. She also said she enjoyed coming to work and giving her best with colleagues at an organization that improved people’s lives.

In his concluding remarks, Ross thanked everyone for their hard work, dedication and caring attitudes over the last year, adding the efforts paid off in PCC’s recognition by WalletHub as the No. 1 community college in America for students’ educational outcomes and on the college’s successful SACSCOC reaffirmation visit.

He said enrollment had begun to grow again after the COVID-19 pandemic. In fact, Pamlico had the 10th highest increase in the state community college system this year, Ross said.

He also said he was honored and pleased that employee morale had remained high in recent years – something that the president believes leads to great things.

After briefly touching on his advocacy for the college with the N.C. General Assembly and the N.C. Department of Corrections, Ross, whose employment contract recently was extended for four years by the Board of Trustees, said he was excited about PCC’s future.

“This is what I want to do: To work with others to change lives,” he said. “Our college has such great days ahead of us. I am an unwavering optimist about the future.”

Employees then participated in a singalong of the Beatles’ hit “Here Comes the Sun.”

The lunchtime meal was catered by Nest Café, which is operated by a former Pamlico Correctional Institution offender. Instructor Ronald Scott offered the blessing before the meal.

 


College to Host 2023 Commencement Friday

May 8, 2023

The most joyous day of Pamlico Community College’s year is almost here!

The college will host its 2023 Commencement Exercises on Friday, May 12, beginning at 6:30 p.m. at the Ned Everett Delamar Center on the college’s Grantsboro campus.

One hundred thirty-two men and women in the college’s curriculum and Continuing Education programs have qualified for recognition over the last year. Those students have earned a combined 183 academic and Continuing Education credentials, including 37 associate degrees, 10 diplomas, 54 certificates and 82 Continuing Education recognitions.

Six students will be receiving two associate’s degrees each, and six Pamlico County High School seniors will be recognized for earning their Associate in Arts degrees the same year they will graduate from high school.

“All of us at the college are extremely excited about Commencement,” Ross said. “Like last year, we will be indoors at the Delamar Center for a full ceremony. We anticipate the event will be very inspiring. It gives all of us an opportunity to congratulate our graduates for their accomplishments, and it is the perfect occasion to salute their families for the sacrifices they have made to help our students achieve their goals.”

Ross will be presiding over his seventh Commencement as the college’s president. Cecilia A. “Candy” Bohmert, current vice chair of the Pamlico County Board of Commissioners and a member of the college’s Board of Trustees, will give the Commencement address.

Bohmert has a long-standing relationship with the college. In addition to her current service as a trustee, she earned an associate degree in Environmental Science Technology from PCC in 1996 and was honored as the college’s Alumnus of the Year in 2019.

“Candy Bohmert is an outstanding friend of our college, and we look forward to hearing what she has to say to the graduates,” Ross said.

The Class of 2023’s youngest graduate is 17, and the oldest graduate is 63.

All of this year’s graduates will be completing their studies in an academic year when PCC was recognized once again as America’s No. 1 community college for student success by WalletHub. The college has been honored with that title in two of the last three years.

During the ceremony, the college’s Academic Excellence Award/Student of the Year winner will be announced. Four students have been nominated this year. The college also will honor its Alumnus of the Year.

A reception with refreshments will follow the ceremony.

As in years past, the college has hired a professional photographer to take free family portraits for the graduates and their loved ones. Each complimentary portrait will be available to take home that night.

 


Six PCHS Seniors on Track to Get Degrees

CCP Student with Dr. Ross

May 1, 2023

“Six amazing high school seniors are making Pamlico Community College history this year,” stated PCC President Dr. Jim Ross. “They are on track to soon earn their PCC Associate in Arts degrees, meaning they will do so during the same academic year they will graduate from Pamlico County High School.”

He continued, “These hard-working, outstanding students will gain tremendous advantages in jump-starting their careers and saving thousands of dollars in tuition costs by taking advantage of the biggest bargain in higher education. I look forward to presenting their college diplomas to them on May 12 at the PCC Commencement ceremony.”

The six students – all young women – have been able to accomplish this feat by taking tuition-free, college-level courses from PCC through the N.C. Career & College Promise program.

The credits earned by the high-achieving half-dozen counted both toward their high school diplomas and toward their associate degrees at PCC. These transferable college credits also give them a significant head start over their peers as they enroll in four-year universities or in other professional programs – and it didn’t cost any of them a dime.

“In years past, PCC has had high school students qualify for their associate degrees in the same year they receive their high school diplomas, but to have six students reach this tremendous goal in one year is something entirely unprecedented in our college’s history,” Ross said. “We are so proud of these students and their remarkable accomplishments. We know the future is bright for all six of these young women, and I think their story demonstrates the tremendous opportunities available to local high schoolers through the Career & College Promise program.”

The “starting five” of the group – Taylor Buck, Alessandra De La Cruz-Cornelio, Andrea Lopez, Mariah Stowe and De’yana Thomas – will complete their college coursework in May, meaning they will receive their associate degrees before they get their high school diplomas.

The sixth member of the team, Stephanie Harris, is on track to finish her final AA courses this summer.

All six are qualified to participate in the college’s Commencement ceremony May 12 at the Delamar Center.

In a recent interview, the six students said they had known one another since childhood, and all six had attended the same four Pamlico County public schools – Pamlico Primary, Fred A. Anderson Elementary, Pamlico County Middle School and Pamlico County High School – during their careers.

They said they learned about the tuition-free CCP program from their parents and other family members. Some said their moms were insistent they give the courses a try. Lopez said her cousins, who took several courses, “wished they had taken more.”

The students said they were attracted to the college-level courses, which are offered in both seated and online formats, because they would help them get ahead in their studies and qualify them for transferable college credits tuition-free. Earning their associate degrees also helped to set them apart from their high school classmates, the women said, adding members of their high school class were competitive and strong academically.

“If you wanted to be among those on top, you had to find a way,” Stowe said.

Buck plans to study elementary education at East Carolina University. She will be part of the university’s Living-Learning Community for first-year education students.

De La Cruz-Cornelio also will enroll at East Carolina University, where she plans to study psychology. She hopes to earn a master’s degree and become an occupational therapist.

It’s a Carolina blue future for Lopez, who will attend the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill and will study political science. She hopes to attend law school and become an immigration attorney.

Stowe, Harris and Thomas, who, at 17, is the youngest of the six, plan to become registered nurses.

Thomas, essentially a college junior at age 17, is headed to N.C. A&T State University in Greensboro. Harris and Stowe plan to attend Craven Community College.

Always looking to stay ahead, both Stowe and Thomas already have taken and passed a Nurse Aide I course through PCC’s Continuing Education division.

The women say taking and passing PCC college-level courses will help them to avoid some of their respective programs’ prerequisite courses – many of which are often difficult to get into and are offered only in huge lecture halls.

It took hard work and discipline to earn associate degrees while in high school. They often took large course loads, including during Summer Terms, all the while balancing their high school work and other responsibilities.

The experience likely prepared them for their upcoming lives as full-time college students.

“You get treated like an adult,” Lopez said. The others agreed, saying they’ve realized they have to rely on themselves – not their mothers, professors or anyone else – to remind them to do assignments, to meet deadlines and to stay motivated.

Derek Godwin, who oversees the CCP program, said the women deserve recognition for their hard work.

“They are all great kids,” he said. “They have impressed me with their work ethic and their willingness to take on challenges. I am certain they will be very successful at the next level.”

Group members are looking forward to both their college and high school graduation ceremonies, although it can be difficult to explain to family members exactly how they’re getting recognized for earning their college degrees before their high school diplomas.

“It feels backwards telling family that,” Thomas said with a chuckle.

Ross said the college is proud of all students who will graduate on May 12. “We commend each of our graduates for working hard, overcoming many obstacles, and persevering to reach this important milestone in their lives.”

For more information about the Career & College Promise program at PCC, call 252-249-1851, ext. 3106, or email dgodwin@pamlicocc.edu.

 


Tuition-Free Courses Set for CCP Students

Summer CCP Classes

April 24, 2023

Summer is a time for relaxing in the sun and having some fun, but it’s also a time when motivated high school students can get ahead in their studies. Pamlico Community College can help!

The college will be offering a robust slate of tuition-free University Transfer courses in an online format this summer.

The courses, which are available through the Career & College Promise (CCP) program, are specifically for rising high school seniors (current juniors who will be seniors in 2023-24) and for graduating Class of 2023 seniors who still will be in high school by the PCC class start date, which is May 22.

Enrolling in and passing one or more of these courses is a fantastic way to secure transferable college credit at no charge, PCC leaders say.

“We are excited about this opportunity for students,” said PCC President Dr. Jim Ross. “The CCP program is a remarkable value for Pamlico County families with some students actually earning their PCC college degree free of charge at the same time they earn their high school diploma!”

The president continued, “I strongly believe every eligible high school student should strive to take as many of our CCP classes as possible. This will give them a head start on gaining college credits, and the classes are free! I enjoyed teaching a class to them last year and was impressed by the students’ intelligence and commitment as well as how very much they progressed during the year.”

Neil Callahan, the college’s coordinator of academic advising, said, “Current CCP students who are rising seniors and those graduating in June have a unique opportunity to take advantage of transferable course offerings at PCC this summer. For rising seniors, you can get a head start on finishing up your CCP Transfer Pathway. For graduating seniors, you can gain a few extra courses to take with you when you apply to four-year institutions. The best part of all of this is that these courses are tuition-free. Save money before you go off to college!”

The list of courses includes nearly two dozen popular online offerings, including essential classes in Art Appreciation, Biology, Chemistry, English, History, Computer Science, Mathematics, Psychology and more.

The approved credits earned by passing these courses can be used toward a degree at PCC or can be transferred to the state’s public universities. Several private colleges and universities in North Carolina also accept these credits.

“Earning tuition-free college credits while in high school is a wonderful thing,” Ross said. “These Summer School courses will enable motivated high school students to earn credits in the same way. I encourage eligible high schoolers to take advantage of this opportunity.”

For more information or to register for PCC’s Summer School University Transfer courses, please contact Derek Godwin at 252-249-1851, ext. 3106, or dgodwin@pamlicocc.edu.

 


Local Educator Joins PCC Board of Trustees

March 29, 2023

A self-described “lifelong learner” who spent more than three decades working in public education is the newest member of the Pamlico Community College Board of Trustees.

Sherry G. Meador, who retired in 2021 after a 33-year career as a classroom teacher, school administrator and central office leader in Pamlico County and elsewhere, has been appointed by the Pamlico County Board of Education to serve out the unexpired term of the late Larry Prescott.

Meador, who attended her first board meeting March 28, said she expected her career in public education to help her in her new role as a PCC trustee.

“I know the language and I know the processes,” she said. “And I think once you stop learning, you stop living.”

Bob Lyon, chairman of the college’s Board of Trustees, said he is pleased to have Meador join the board.

“I’ve known her many years. She is a fine person,” he said. “She will be a great asset to our board. She has worked with children and she has worked in administration with the school system. That will be a help for us.”

PCC President Dr. Jim Ross said he expects Meador to be an excellent member of the PCC Board of Trustees.

“I am very impressed with her,” he said. “Her love of learning and love of education with serve our college well.”

Meador was born in Elizabeth City and grew up in Manteo. After graduating as salutatorian from Manteo High School in 1985, she enrolled at Appalachian State University in Boone, where she earned a bachelor’s degree in K-12 special education.

“I wanted to be an advocate for students,” Meador said. “I was a lover of learning and I wanted everybody to have the same chance to learn.”

After teaching in Randleman, Greensboro and Clayton, Meador followed her husband, Rusty Meador, in 1991 to Pamlico County, where Rusty, a North Carolina Wildlife Resources Commission officer, had been assigned. She was hired by the Pamlico County Schools and began a long career in the system.

Along the way, she earned her certification to teach math – which included taking courses at PCC – and later her master’s degree in school administration from East Carolina University, which enabled her to take work as an assistant principal and principal at the middle school and at Fred A. Anderson Elementary School.

Later in her career, she held central office posts with ever-expanding roles in curriculum, instruction, accountability, professional development, school improvement and more.

“I’m a good multi-tasker,” Meador said with a smile. “You just do it.”

She has been recognized for excellence, earning honors as Teacher of the Year and Principal of the Year. Additionally, Meador received the Order of the Long Leaf Pine from the Governor’s Office.

Now retired, she enjoys finding and making crafts with sea glass, reading, cooking and taking short trips with her husband and friends on their personal watercrafts.

The Meadors live with their five dogs in the Dawson Creek area. They have two grown children.

The PCC Board of Trustees is made up of 12 members. Four members are appointed by the Governor’s Office, four are appointed by the Pamlico County Board of Commissioners and four are appointed by the Pamlico County Board of Education.

 


PCC Seeks to Double Vocational Programs

March 29, 2023

Pamlico Community College President Dr. Jim Ross strongly believes the college must do even more to provide programs to prepare local residents for careers where they can work with their hands in vocational, technical and Allied Health fields.

Ross has made this a top priority since becoming PCC president six years ago because these jobs are plentiful, pay great wages, and are desperately needed by businesses in Eastern North Carolina. He cites strong national trends that show adult learners want short-term training programs that can qualify them for positions in high growth sectors of the economy such as health care.

PCC faculty and staffers have successfully responded to the President’s priority and added 20 short-term, hands-on training programs the past five years in skilled trades, Allied Health and other in-demand careers.

“We have been very aggressive in launching hands-on training programs that can be completed quickly and that can lead to good-paying jobs in health care and other important fields,” Ross said. “We have identified this as a college priority for the good it can do for our community and have added nearly two dozen programs over the last five years – and for the good of our community we’re just getting started.”

A task force Ross established last year documented 28 new vocational programs in addition to those already established that are needed, and Ross has made this a top priority for the college to achieve. PCC now is committed to doubling the number of its vocational and technical programs and doubling its Allied Health programs.

Ross is enthused to pursue the challenges in gaining funding to accomplish this. His enthusiasm and optimism are based on the tremendous good that will come to our community from this.

“We are pursuing a bold and noble goal to double the number of our vocational programs and double the number of our Allied Health programs in order to help make many more Pamlico citizens’ lives better. We pray for success in doing so because many local lives will be made so much better by achieving this,” he said. “In addition, our college and those that provide funding for this will be addressing severe shortages that businesses have in our state in finding well-trained employees in the vocational, technical and Allied Health fields.”

Pamlico Community College is one of America’s most-honored community colleges in the past five years. For example, PCC is currently ranked number 1 in the United States in student success among all community colleges. This prestigious ranking comes from WalletHub as it analyzed extensive data in student education outcomes from the U.S. Department of Education. This is the second time in the past three years that PCC has earned the number 1 ranking in the nation.

Ross has consistently given enthusiastic credit to “the caring and dedicated PCC employees for the great work they do” as the reason for the multitude of national and state awards the college has almost continuously earned the past five years.

The college is currently enrolling students for one of its newest Allied Health programs – Electronic Health Records. It’s an online program that trains individuals to maintain manual and electronic health records and to use them for data collection and analysis, data sources/sets, archival systems and more. It is scheduled to begin April 17.

In vocational and technical courses, PCC plans to offer new sections of its popular one-day Forklift Training course as well as the ServSafe food safety course. Both courses are scheduled for April.

For more information about upcoming courses at the college, please call 252-249-1851, ext. 3015, email lgiles@pamlicocc.edu or visit http://www.pamlicocc.edu/programs-continuing.php on the web.

 


Golden LEAF Supports Allied Health Project

Dr. Ross, Continuing Education student and Lori Giles

February 27, 2023

Pamlico Community College will use $500,000 in recently announced funding from the Golden LEAF Foundation to transform the former boat-building shop in the Johnson Building into a versatile classroom and lab space for its ever-growing list of short-term Allied Health programs.

Plans call for renovating the vacant, roughly 2,000-square-foot space and installing important instructional equipment, supplies and technology to train men and women for in-demand health care jobs in Pamlico County and the region.

PCC President Dr. Jim Ross welcomed the generous support, saying it would accelerate the college’s ongoing efforts to offer a wider range of short-term, hands-on Continuing Education programs to meet the needs of adult learners and local employers.

“These funds will allow us to serve our community even better through one of our top priorities I identified when I became president six years ago – that of offering more and better Continuing Education Allied Health programs and other options to our community,” he said. “Our college deeply appreciates the funding decision from Golden LEAF to provide this $500,000 for this important purpose. We are honored to have developed a positive working relationship with Golden LEAF.”

Golden LEAF President and Chief Executive Officer Scott T. Hamilton said, “Golden LEAF is pleased to support the growth of Pamlico Community College’s Continuing Education and health care programs to meet the needs of local employers. Developing a prepared workforce is key to the long-term economic advancement of Pamlico County and the region.”

Under Ross’s leadership and at the recommendation of a presidential task force, PCC has added more than 20 short-term programs and courses in Allied Health and other areas in recent years, including Dialysis Technician, Physical Therapy Technician, Pharmacy Technician, Community Health Worker and others.

The renovated space will provide additional flexibility and will lead to additional program offerings, said Lori Giles, the college’s chair of Continuing Education and Technical Programs.

“This generous Golden LEAF investment will allow our college to create a contemporary, multi-disciplinary laboratory space to provide interactive health care occupations instruction,” she said. “We have needed some additional space to grow, and this will be a tremendous help. We are honored to receive this funding, as this will allow us to expand current health care offerings and initiate new programs.”

Beyond Allied Health, PCC also has added additional short-term, hands-on programs in Plumbing, HVAC, Solar Energy and Sustainable Agriculture, with plans to add more in the short term.

Ross said national trends indicate students want to explore short-term training options that can lead to good-paying jobs, and Pamlico Community College stands ready to meet that need.

“Our college has dramatically increased the number of short-term Continuing Education programs in Allied Health, vocational and technical areas in recent years, and we plan to continue,” he said. “Imagine the number of families we can help in our region when we do so.”

Ross reiterated his thanks to Golden LEAF for its support, and he also thanked Pamlico County officials for their work in helping the college secure the funding.

“I appreciate very much Pamlico County Manager Tim Buck and his team recommending our college to Golden LEAF to receive this funding,” he said. “The Pamlico County commissioners and Tim Buck are incredible friends of our college and of our entire community.”

 


US Congressman Visits PCC Students, Leaders

Dr. Ross and Congressman Murphy

February 16, 2023

U.S. Rep. Greg Murphy and members of his district office staff visited Pamlico Community College Wednesday to meet with PCC President Dr. Jim Ross and other college leaders, to observe one of PCC’s health care courses and to thank the college and its employees for their numerous national recognitions for excellence and positive contributions to the community.

Ross said, “It was an honor for PCC that Congressman Murphy selected our college to come to visit. I enjoyed getting to know him and members of his team. He impressed me as a thoughtful, independent leader, and I look forward to working with him in the future to improve opportunities for the residents of Pamlico County and the region.”

Murphy lauded Ross for his remarkable leadership that has brought great accomplishments for Pamlico County citizens. Murphy said he found it extraordinary that on-campus surveys have found 95 percent of PCC employees reported high morale. In contrast, national surveys show approximately 30 percent of workers across America in all fields have high morale.

The congressman also praised PCC leaders for their empathy and support for students, saying a single positive interaction can affect a student’s outlook and prospects for success.

Murphy, a physician, is serving his second full term in the U.S. House of Representatives. The Greenville Republican first was elected to the Third District U.S. House seat in 2019 to serve out the term of the late Walter B. Jones Jr., who had died in office. Murphy was re-elected to the seat in 2020 and in 2022.

After arriving at the college Wednesday, Murphy and his staffers were briefed about the college and its recent honors and accomplishments by Ross. The congressman’s group, which also included two members of the Pamlico County Board of Commissioners and Pamlico County Manager Tim Buck, then walked to the Delamar Center to visit with students in a Nurse Aide I course.

Nurse Aide I is one of the most popular short-term Continuing Education health care programs offered by PCC. Many, including Dialysis Technician, Physical Therapy Technician and Medical Billing and Coding, have been added in recent years. There are plans to expand the number of health care and other hands-on program offerings in the future, Ross explained to the congressman.

Following the classroom visit, Murphy was ushered to the Delamar Center Conference Room, where more than a dozen members of the PCC President’s Cabinet introduced themselves and offered their thoughts about working with students.

After leaving the conference room, Murphy, Ross and others stopped in the Delamar Center Auditorium, where the president explained why he made the decision five years ago to waive rental fees for Pamlico County non-profit organizations to better serve the community and the dramatic impact it has had on the community. It has also resulted in a huge increase in the community’s use of the facility.

Ross expressed appreciation to the “wonderful community” for fully embracing PCC with great partnerships. He also praised the Pamlico County commissioners for their outstanding support and partnership, and he thanked Buck and Commissioners Kari Forrest and Ed Riggs Jr. for accompanying Murphy to PCC Wednesday.

 


NCWorks Staffers Now Visit Twice Monthly

VP Jamie Gibbs, Cristy Warner and NCWorks staffer

February 13, 2023

Pamlico Community College and the Craven NCWorks Career Center are expanding their partnership, which is great news for anyone looking for a new job and any employer searching for new staffers.

Beginning this month, staffers from the NCWorks New Bern office will be in the Johnson Building at PCC’s Grantsboro campus every first and third Tuesday each month from 10 a.m. to 2 p.m. to meet with job-seekers and to assist potential employers.

Working in collaboration with PCC’s Cristy Lewis Warner, NCWorks can assist Pamlico County men and women in searching for jobs, improving their skills or developing career plans.

No appointment is required. Services are free and open to the public.

“We are proud of our partnership with the Craven NCWorks Career Center, which itself is a collaboration between the N.C. Department of Commerce, the Eastern Carolina Workforce Development Board and many regional service and educational partners,” said PCC President Dr. Jim Ross. “Having their staffers on campus will enhance our ability to match residents with new jobs and training opportunities, which will result in an improved quality of life for everyone.”

Warner, who is director of the PCC Career Resource Center, said the Craven NCWorks Career Center is a tremendous resource to have on campus each month.

“Having Craven NCWorks on campus will provide Pamlico County residents with assistance in connecting with our regional employment opportunities and information about training opportunities,” she said.

One of those opportunities for job-seekers is the Workforce Innovation & Opportunity Act (WIOA) Adult program, which assists adults who may need training to enter the current labor market.

“Additionally, employers can also connect with the center to list jobs, locate potential employees and learn about their many employer services,” Warner added.

For more information about the services available at the college, contact Warner at 252-249-1851, ext. 3014, or cwarner@pamlicocc.edu. The Craven NCWorks Career Center in New Bern can be reached by calling 252-514-4828 or by visiting www.ncworks.gov.

 


29 Students Named to Fall President’s List

Gayle Hardy

February 2, 2023

Pamlico Community College has announced the names of the students who have earned placement on the PCC President’s List for the Fall 2022 semester.

To be eligible for the list, a student must be enrolled full time throughout the semester and must earn a grade point average between 3.5 and 4.0.

“It is an honor to salute these hard-working and dedicated men and women who have achieved great success in their respective academic programs,” said PCC President Dr. Jim Ross. “We are proud of these high-achieving students and look forward to celebrating their next successes.”

The 29 students named to the Fall 2022 President’s List are:

* Hannah Altman of Grantsboro (Cosmetology)

* Cindy Barker of New Bern (Associate in Arts)

* Terria Barrett of Vanceboro (Cosmetology)

* Savannah Barton of Bayboro (Welding)

* Angela Bateman of Cary (Associate in Arts/Partnership Teach program)

* Taylor Bateman of Cary (Criminal Justice)

* Ashley Bowers of New Bern (Associate in Science)

* Julissa Figueroa-Beltran of Grantsboro (Associate in Science)

* Angel Gaylord of Aurora (Environmental Science Technology)

* Faith Gayring of Sebastian, Fla. (Associate in Arts)

* Gwendolyn Hart of Alliance (Criminal Justice)

* Maria Herrera of Raleigh (Associate in Science)

* Ayden Hill of New Bern (Welding)

* Madison Hughes of Jacksonville (Dental Laboratory Technology)

* Kyle Jacobs of New Bern (Associate in Science)

* Megan Jones of Bayboro (Associate in Science)

* Alexandra McMillin of Newport (Business Administration)

* Rochelle Meadows of Aurora (Early Childhood Education)

* Alexandria Midgette of New Bern (Business Administration)

* Allison Midyette of Grantsboro (Cosmetology)

* Kelsey Price of Aurora (Medical Assisting)

* Ashley Ray of New Bern (Dental Laboratory Technology)

* Presley Robinson of Grantsboro (Cosmetology)

* Anajah Rouse of Bayboro (Cosmetology)

* Ayesha Salim of New Bern (Accounting & Finance)

* Lauren Schmidt of Bayboro (Medical Assisting)

* Mary Simpson of Grantsboro (Associate in Science)

* Joshua Tillman of Oriental (Business Administration)

* Thelma Wynn of New Bern (Accounting & Finance)

The following student has earned placement on Pamlico Community College’s Academic Distinction List for the Fall 2022 semester. To be eligible, a student must be enrolled full-time throughout the semester and earn a grade point average between 3.0 and 3.49.

* Stephany Carvallo of Aurora (Early Childhood Birth to Kindergarten Associate Degree)

 


Former Educator Joins PCC Board of Trustees

Gayle Hardy

January 25, 2023

A former Craven County Teacher of the Year who spent nearly four decades working in public education is the newest member of the Pamlico Community College Board of Trustees.

Gayle Hardy, a Pamlico County resident who retired in 2021 after working 38 years as a classroom teacher and in other roles for school systems in Craven County, Pamlico County and Norfolk, Va., has been appointed to the board by Gov. Roy Cooper to serve out the unexpired term of Dr. Sue Lee.

She was scheduled to attend her first board meeting Jan. 24.

“I’m excited to be part of the conversation again,” said Hardy, who most recently worked as the Advancement Via Individual Determination (AVID) program coordinator and AVID elective instructor at New Bern High School – a role for which she earned the title of Teacher of the Year in 2020.

Bob Lyon, chairman of the college’s Board of Trustees, said he is pleased to have Hardy join the board.

“I welcome her to the Board of Trustees,” he said. “I look forward to working with her to make the college better.”

PCC President Dr. Jim Ross said he expects Hardy to be an excellent member of the PCC Board of Trustees.

“She impressed me greatly with her more than 30 years of experience in helping students reach their potential to succeed in the classroom,” he said. “Her record of changing students’ lives for the better is extraordinary, and this entire region is better because of her impact on students’ lives. The governor made an excellent decision in appointing her.”

Hardy has deep roots in the region. She grew up in the Broad Creek area of Craven County with family members on both sides of the Craven-Pamlico county line.

“We crossed over that line two or three times a day growing up,” Hardy said with a chuckle.

A shy girl, Hardy said she was initially unenthusiastic about school, but came to love it after good years with great teachers at Bridgeton Elementary School and elsewhere. Hardy graduated from New Bern High School and went on to earn a bachelor’s degree in elementary education from East Carolina University in 1984 and a master’s degree in education from ECU in 1986.

She taught at Fred A. Anderson Elementary School in Bayboro for two years before taking a job as a teacher and grant coordinator in Norfolk, Va. After six formative and rewarding years there, Hardy returned to Eastern North Carolina and worked as a classroom teacher at elementary schools in Craven County before taking a job as a reading specialist at New Bern High School. Her final position was as AVID coordinator/instructor at NBHS, where she worked to prepare underserved students for success in college or careers.

“My goal was to open up as many opportunities as possible and for them to be successful,” she said.

Hardy is married to John Hardy, a man with Wayne County roots she met during her time in Virginia. They live in Olympia and have two grown daughters.

The PCC Board of Trustees is made up of 12 members. Four members are appointed by the Governor’s Office, four are appointed by the Pamlico County Board of Commissioners and four are appointed by the Pamlico County Board of Education.

 


CCP Registration Set for Jan. 24 and 25 in Bayboro

CCP students outside of the Ernestine R. Mattocks Bldg.

January 17, 2023

High school juniors and seniors who are interested in enrolling in tuition-free Pamlico Community College courses can sign up for those classes next Tuesday and Wednesday, Jan. 24 and 25, from 8 a.m. to 3 p.m. each day at the Mattocks Center in Bayboro.

The credits earned by passing these college-level N.C. Career & College Promise (CCP) courses can help students get ahead on either a college degree or an in-demand hands-on career.

Importantly, they help students, and their families save lots of money.

“Tuition-free CCP courses are the among the best things we offer. In fact, I believe there is no better bargain in American higher education today than the tuition-free college-level courses we offer to high school juniors and seniors,” said PCC President Dr. Jim Ross. “The CCP program is a wonderful way for motivated students who want to get ahead in their studies or who want to get started on their careers to do so.”

The CCP program is open to local students, regardless of whether they attend Pamlico County High School, Arapahoe Charter School, Pamlico Christian Academy or a home school.

The courses are taught in a face-to-face format, an online format or in a combination of both. Many of the courses are offered at the Ernestine R. Mattocks Center of Excellence, which is located behind PCC’s Bayboro Center and across the street from Pamlico County High School.

Others are offered on the PCC campus in Grantsboro or online.

At PCC, CCP students earn an average of 39 free college credit hours while still in high school. That’s a lot of money saved in college or university tuition and fees!

Students and their families are encouraged to talk to their high school guidance counselors or to contact PCC’s Derek Godwin at dgodwin@pamlicocc.edu or 252-249-1851, ext. 3106, for more information.

 


Lana Green Receives PCC President’s Award

Dr. Ross and Lana Green

January 9, 2023

Lana Green says you never know who’s watching and appreciating your work and your attitude.

Never has that been truer for the full-time custodian and New Bern native than when Pamlico Community College President Dr. Jim Ross named her the recipient of the 2022-23 President’s Award.

The award, which Ross created after he became the college’s fifth president in 2016, is presented annually to a PCC employee who is considered by Ross to be a great example of being professional and productive on the job and who has a positive attitude.

Green’s selection was announced during the college’s Christmas luncheon in December. Ross formally presented her the award Monday on campus.

“Lana Green exemplifies the key attributes of professionalism, productivity and positivity,” Ross said. “She is an outstanding professional and an outstanding person.”

For her part, Green was surprised to receive the award. She was visibly moved upon hearing her name at the December luncheon and, a month later, is still surprised the president had taken note of her efforts on the job.

“I was just shocked. I had no clue,” Green said recently. “In my position, a lot of time you don’t get recognized. Never in a million years did I think Dr. Ross would choose me.”

Green has been employed at PCC since 2016. Her duties include cleaning rooms and entranceways and ensuring the restrooms are sanitary and stocked with supplies. She occasionally is the first person visitors encounter at the college, so she enjoys answering questions and giving directions.

“I help people who come to the college get to where they need to go,” Green said. “I love it. I’m a people person.”

Ross said he often takes note of Green’s ever-present smile and was impressed by her recent willingness to assist someone who was experiencing difficulty in the restroom.

“She makes lives better every single day at our college,” he said.

Green has worked at PCC since 2016. After working in home health care, she came to the college in search of a job with better hours and good benefits. Green still works a side job in home health care when she’s not at the college.

She said she likes her work at Pamlico and loves the family atmosphere on campus.

“I enjoy working here at Pamlico Community College,” Green said. “I try to do the best I can. I love it. There’s a work family here.”

Speaking of family, Green is the mother of two sons who live in the New Bern area. She also is close with her brother and two sisters, and she says she is happy that God has put her in a good place with a good job.

“I am thankful,” Green said. “I owe it all to God. I am highly blessed. I’m also thankful to Dr. Jim Ross for considering me.”

Previous recipients of the President’s Award include Herman Turnage, Pattie Leary, Cameron Kishel, Gary Toler and Meredith Beeman.


PCC Participates in Christmas Parades

PCC Employees with parade float

December 12, 2023

More than 20 Pamlico Community College employees and family members represented the college in the Spirit of Christmas Parade on Dec. 9 in Oriental.

The college’s float featured giant gingerbread men, candy canes, lollipops, and candies. Brightly colored tinsel and wrapping paper completed the attractive entry.

Most PCC participants rode aboard the float or on the college’s pickup truck. A few, including Vice President of Student Services Jamie D. Gibbs, Instructor Zac Schnell, and Bookstore Manager Paula Meola, walked the parade route to hand out candy.

Special thanks go to Meola, Laura West, and everyone else who worked on the college’s float. Thanks also to everyone who donated candy for the event.

The college also planned to participate in the Pamlico County Christmas Parade in Bayboro on Dec. 16.


Electrical Tech Class Tries New Goggles

December 4, 2023

Students in Pamlico Community College’s Electrical Systems Technology program recently got to try out some virtual-reality and augmented-reality goggles in class and then were asked for their opinions about their effectiveness as teaching tools.

Yilei Huang, an associate professor in East Carolina University’s Department of Construction Management, brought the devices for class members to try. He then used a five-page survey to collect their thoughts on whether the goggles were helpful for lab exercises.

The students generally agreed the augmented-reality goggles were preferable to the virtual-reality versions, saying the virtual-reality goggles made some of them dizzy and disoriented.

“They’re very immersive, like being in another world,” said PCC Electrical Systems Technology Instructor Larry Monk, who also gave both kinds of goggles a try.

Huang had programmed the augmented-reality goggles to match the setup of an in-class electrical lab at PCC. He and an assistant from ECU recorded all of the class members’ input for use by the university.

It was great for PCC students to get a look at some of the most advanced teaching technology, PCC officials said. The exercise also will help the college continue to build partnerships with ECU and others, they said.

The college’s Electrical Systems Technology program trains students to install and maintain electrical and electronics systems found in homes, businesses, and industrial sites.

Coursework, most of which is hands-on, includes topics such as AC/DC theory, basic wiring practices, programmable logic controllers, industrial motor controls, applications of the National Electric Code, and other subjects.

Students can earn an Associate of Applied Science degree, and there are certificate options available.

Monk, a 2012 graduate of the program, is the lead instructor. For more information about PCC’s Electrical Systems Technology program, contact him at lmonk@pamlicocc.edu or 252-249-1851, ext. 3029.


PCC Medication Aide Course Now Scheduled

November 27, 2023

Pamlico Community College will offer its four-day Medication Aide course for current CNAs on Dec. 6, 7, 13, and 14.

Hours will be 9 a.m. to 3:30 p.m.

The cost is $70.55.

The course is designed for current CNAs who are ready to take on more responsibilities at work.

Interested? Contact Lori Giles at 252-249-1851, ext. 3015, or lgiles@pamlicocc.edu.


 

PCC Hosts Four-Year Colleges on Campus

November 20, 2023

Representatives of nine four-year colleges and universities visited PCC’s Johnson Building on Nov. 2 to meet with prospective transfer students and others.

The annual visit gives PCC students, area high schoolers, and others an opportunity to ask questions and weigh their options for transferring or enrolling at one of North Carolina’s four-year colleges and universities.

“It was an amazing day filled with conversations about careers and training pathways that start here at PCC and continue on to four-year schools throughout the state,” said PCC Counselor/Career Center Director Cristy Lewis Warner, who helped to host the visit. “It is always a day filled with information and exploration. The ability to ask questions large and small to these four-year schools and to get one-on-one answers directly from their staff is a powerful tool of connection.”

The participating institutions were Campbell University, East Carolina University, N.C. State University, N.C. Wesleyan University, Northeastern University-Charlotte, Salem College, UNC Wilmington, Western Carolina University, and Western Governors University.

Representatives set up displays at tables in the Johnson Building. They shared literature and fun giveaway items, answered questions, and gave area students a glimpse at what’s possible.

“To meet these four-year colleges face to face here in our community opens the door of communication for our students to learn more about the multitude of possibilities that exist for their futures,” Warner said. “It was encouraging to see so many middle and high school students explore their future education options, too.”

 


 

College Receives More National Recognitions

Pamlico Community College was recently nationally ranked as one of America’s very best community colleges for 2023 by national firm SmartAsset. Additionally, in a national ranking by the national website WalletHub, PCC has also been ranked as a top 10 national leader for 2023 among community colleges throughout the nation in student success.

SmartAsset, a New York-based personal finance technology company, recently analyzed federal data for more than 800 community colleges across America. Based on this analysis, SmartAsset highly ranked Pamlico Community College in its national report titled “Best Community Colleges for 2023”.

Of the 845 colleges SmartAsset analyzed, PCC is ranked at No. 12 on its list of America’s best community colleges for 2023. PCC President Dr. Jim Ross enthusiastically praised the “amazing PCC faculty and staff as the reason for this elite ranking.”

In addition, WalletHub, a personal finance website, recently once again ranked PCC among the top 10 community colleges in America for student educational outcomes.

“PCC faculty and staff serve with their hearts and truly want to make students’ lives better,” said Ross, “and this is seen in the elite ranking as No. 6 among community colleges throughout our nation in student educational outcomes.”

These national rankings, which were based on a review of federal education data and other materials, follow a strong string of national honors and recognitions Pamlico Community College has received in recent years.

Ross said, “These recognitions demonstrate how effective our faculty and staff are at helping students achieve their academic dreams so they can improve their lives and the lives of their families. It is an honor to work with these fantastic professionals.”

According to its report, SmartAsset analyzed data for 845 two-year colleges, ranking them based on their student-to-faculty ratios, retention rates and the cost of tuition and fees. Southeastern Community College in Whiteville took the top spot in Smart Asset’s analysis, and nine of the top 25 are from North Carolina. 

“North Carolina’s community college system is the best in America in my opinion,” Ross said. “It is a tremendous asset for our state’s overall economic health, and it is appropriate to see our community colleges across North Carolina recognized for their exceptional work.”

Pamlico Community College has now been ranked five times among SmartAsset’s top 25 community colleges in the past seven years. 

Meanwhile, WalletHub has once again ranked PCC in its top 10 community colleges nationally for students’ Educational Outcomes. This is the third time PCC has been ranked in the top 10 in the past four years. 

According to the methodology it posted online, WalletHub determined its Educational Outcomes rankings by scoring 668 colleges on these factors: first-year retention rate; graduation rate; transfer-out rate; degree and certificates awarded per 100 full-time-equivalent students; student-faculty ratio; share of full-time faculty; presence of special learning opportunities such as dual enrollment or distance education programs; and credit for life experiences. 

Southern Arkansas University Tech took the top spot in students’ Educational Outcomes, according to WalletHub.

In addition to its rankings by SmartAsset and WalletHub, PCC’s string of national recognitions has included a No. 1 ranking by Best Value Schools on its list of Best Community Colleges in North Carolina in 2021 and a designation as North Carolina’s best online community college for 2020 by Affordable Colleges Online (AC Online).

“I thank God for the remarkable blessings He has provided our college so that our caring employees can make lives better in Pamlico County, this wonderful community we proudly serve,” Ross said.

 


 State Funding Secured for New Health Center

 

Dr. Ross and Karen Standen standing in front of PCC sign

October 31, 2023

 

Persistent efforts of Pamlico Community College President Dr. Jim Ross to aggressively seek funds from the state legislature throughout this past year to begin a nursing program and multiple other in-demand allied health careers have proven remarkably successful. PCC has received a $20 million state appropriation from the General Assembly to build an Allied Health Center in Bayboro. This appropriation, by far the largest in PCC history, will enable the college to add multiple health care programs in high-demand, high-paying career fields, with nursing as its top priority to serve the community for decades to come.

Dr. Ross, who almost continually advocated with legislators for the funding, said the new facility will improve the lives of countless area residents while giving them hope for a brighter future.

“This is a fantastic blessing for the people of our community,” he said. “Our college’s primary focus with this historic funding is making lives better in a monumental way. When completed, this center will be a beacon of hope for the next century for our community. Generations of local residents will benefit by being able to access top-notch training for in-demand jobs in health care.”

Dr. Ross continued, “We thank our great friend Sen. Norman Sanderson for sponsoring the legislation that led to the appropriation being included in the Senate budget. We also thank Rep. Keith Kidwell for his strong support. Most importantly, I thank God for this amazing blessing of a lifetime for our college and community.”

Initial plans call for locating the center on college-owned acreage located beside the Mattocks Center in Bayboro. Dr. Ross said PCC will take its time to achieve excellence with this project and with the many programs that will be created.

“We’re going to take a very thoughtful and visionary approach,” he said. “We want to be imaginative and listen to all opinions on what is needed most. There are so many programs needed it will be a challenging task to narrow it down. We will be conducting additional community needs assessments and discussing options with colleagues at other colleges who have developed similar facilities.”

During Dr. Ross’s presidency, PCC has made adding Allied Health program offerings a key priority. The college has added several short-term health care programs through its Continuing Education division, including Cardiac Monitor Technician, Dialysis Technician, Medical Billing and Coding, Pharmacy Technician, Phlebotomy Technician, Physical Therapy Aide, and others.

Additionally, PCC offers curriculum programs in Medical Assisting and Dental Laboratory Technology, as well as emergency medical responder courses.

However, Pamlico is one of only two community colleges in North Carolina without an Associate Degree in Nursing program (Martin Community College in Williamston is the other), which is something Dr. Ross and other college leaders began vigorously to address in 2017.

To that end, the college employed local nurse Karen Standen to begin investigating the feasibility of launching a nursing program at PCC. To ensure the program could function effectively and that its students could complete clinical work, Standen began establishing relationships with the area medical community.

Then came COVID-19. With greatly reduced funding available, the pandemic halted work on a possible nursing program and limited the college’s ability to explore other healthcare curriculum options. When Dr. Ross said goodbye to Standen at that time, he startled her with his optimism by vowing to call her in the foreseeable future and resuming the college’s pursuit of a nursing program until the goal is achieved.

Dr. Ross remained resolute, and this year, with help from area legislators, began pushing for state funding of an Allied Health Center that could house college healthcare programs, including nursing. With the funding secured in the state budget, the president reached out to Standen to restart the effort to bring a nursing program to Pamlico County.

“It was with great pleasure that I called Karen and asked her if she was still interested in nursing and expanded allied health programs,” Dr. Ross said. “Her response to me was, ‘That would be amazing.’”

Standen is now working in a consulting role.

“Karen Standen is extremely intelligent, hard-working, results-oriented, a great researcher, and absolutely driven to achieve the best allied health programs possible for our community’s citizens. She will be working closely with Vice President Michelle Willis and me in researching the possible programs. Our vision is that students can get good-paying jobs in health care within driving distance of Pamlico County and then return in the evenings to this beautiful community to raise their families,” Dr. Ross said.

Dr. Ross also has met in recent weeks with retired Randolph Community College President Dr. Bob Shackleford to get his insights. Randolph built a similar Allied Health Center – now named for Shackleford – recently.

In addition to the possible nursing program, PCC’s new Allied Health Center will have space for other “feeder” programs, such as Radiography, Respiratory Care, and others, Dr. Ross said.

Meanwhile, the college’s current array of short-term Continuing Education health care programs likely will remain headquartered at the Grantsboro campus. The renovation of a 2,000-square-foot space in the Johnson Building for those programs is now in the works, thanks to a $500,000 grant from the Golden LEAF Foundation. It allows the expansion of numerous existing Continuing Education offerings and the introduction of others.

Dr. Ross said the Bayboro site for the new Allied Health Center is absolutely ideal because it’s centrally located and easily accessible. He also said its location near the current Pamlico County High School – and the future one – is also helpful.

The president said community residents will be kept informed as the project develops, and he added many will be asked to provide their input on the plans.

“We want this facility to be here to profoundly benefit our students, our college, and our community for a century to come,” Dr. Ross said. “It’s a win-win-win.”

 


 

College Mourns Sudden Passing of Instructor

October 9, 2023

 

The college community is mourning the death of Mathematics Instructor Paul Miller, who died Saturday, Oct. 7, 2023, after suffering a heart attack. He was a retired U.S. Marine and a native of Florida.

In an email to colleagues, Pamlico Community College President Dr. Jim Ross wrote, “He was an extremely dedicated and talented full-time Math instructor who cared deeply about his students. He was highly-respected by his students and his peers. Most importantly, he was a very good and decent human being striving constantly to make a difference in students’ lives. He made a great difference at our college, and he will be missed.”

The president continued, “I had the opportunity to frequently say hello to Paul and ask how things were going. He always lit up and told me with enthusiasm his latest joys in teaching. It was just three weeks ago that he and I talked at length at his request about a serious issue his students were having with one of the publishing companies that resulted in his students not getting books in a timely manner. I was very impressed by the passion that he exhibited during our conversations and the e-mails he copied me on as he led this battle. He was a warrior for our students in taking on this publisher and in the end his efforts brought success for our students. This is just one of a multitude of ways Paul’s students benefitted because of him.”

Ross added, “I called Paul’s wife Jennifer tonight (Saturday) at her request. She displayed amazing caring, love, and poise as we talked. She uplifted my spirit by caring so incredibly much for Paul’s students that this was her purpose for her wish to talk to me. In the midst of her shock and grief, it struck me that her heart was filled with such deep concern for Paul’s students who would expect to be taught on Monday morning. I was so thankful to her for allowing me to talk to her at such an important moment of her life so I could tell her how highly we thought of her husband. I told her I considered him not only an outstanding instructor but also a warrior for his students. I told Mrs. Miller how terribly sorry I am for her loss and asked her to let me know if I could help in any way, even if it was just by listening if she ever needed someone to talk to. She told me she will let us know when funeral services will be held. At that point, we will let you know about this.”

He concluded, “As I end this difficult to write e-mail, may I ask you, if you are so inclined, to join me in praying for Paul, for Mrs. Miller, and for all his loved ones? Faith and prayers for God’s blessings are never more important in my opinion and experience than at a time such as this. May I also respectfully suggest that you go to your own loved ones and give each of them an especially loving hug and tell them how much you appreciate them, how much you love them, and how much you treasure them in your life. We have a limited time in this miracle we call life to do so. None of us know when our lives or our loved ones’ lives will end. We do know, though, that they will end. Please don’t miss the chance to have the most important conversation you will ever have with those you love the most. Please let them know how you truly and deeply feel. May God bless you and all you love now and always.”

 


Tyndall Sisters Find Their Career Passions

 

October 9, 2023

 

Two Grantsboro sisters have already gotten head starts on great hands-on careers as teenagers by taking tuition-free courses through the N.C. Career & College Promise (CCP) program at Pamlico Community College.

Both 18-year-old Haley Tyndall and her 17-year-old sister, Autumn Tyndall, say the CCP courses, which are available to high school juniors and seniors, gave them experience in their chosen occupations while they were still high schoolers at Pamlico Christian Academy.

“They definitely have given us a head start,” said Autumn Tyndall, a PCA senior who is studying Cosmetology at PCC.

Her older-by-20-months sister, Haley, got her start in PCC’s Welding program while still at PCA. Now a high school graduate, she is on track to complete an Associate in Applied Science degree in Welding in 2025. In fact, she has nearly enough credits for an Associate in Arts degree from PCC in 2024!

“The Tyndall sisters illustrate that our Career & College Promise courses are not just for students who plan to go on to a university. They are also for young men and women who want to learn the skills they need to work with their hands and make a good living,” said PCC President Dr. Jim Ross. “Both of these young women will be prepared for the workplace as teenagers. We can’t wait to see what they accomplish.”

PCC has enrolled a record number of students in its CCP courses this semester. The program enables high school juniors and seniors to take college-level university transfer and career courses free of charge.

By enrolling and passing CCP courses, students can get a tremendous head start toward completing a four-year degree or starting a career. They also can save thousands of dollars.

The program is open to students at Pamlico County High School, Arapahoe Charter School, Pamlico Christian Academy or a home school.

Haley Tyndall initially planned to become a law enforcement officer, but, at the suggestion of PCC advisors, enrolled in the college’s Welding program instead. She discovered a passion for welding, which she plans to pursue as a career.

“I knew I wanted to do something hands-on,” she said. “I’m glad I took Welding. You can be kinda creative with it.”

Meanwhile, Autumn Tyndall said she chose to enroll in CCP Cosmetology courses after developing an interest in styling hair. Now 17, she is on track to earn both her high school diploma from Pamlico Christian Academy and her Cosmetology diploma from Pamlico Community College in early 2024.

She plans to work in a salon after graduation to build a clientele, then open her own shop.

Haley Tyndall hopes to find work at Cherry Point, and she might eventually open her own small business.

“Both Haley and Autumn are hard workers, so I know they’ll do well with the careers they’ve chosen,” said Derek Godwin, who oversees the college’s CCP program. “Whether students want to pursue a university degree or get started on a career, we can help.”

Ross added, “I’ve often said CCP courses are the best value I’ve encountered during my career in higher education. I urge high school students and their parents to explore the opportunities available right here in Pamlico County.”

For more information about CCP courses, please contact Derek Godwin at 252-249-1851, ext. 3106, or dgodwin@pamlicocc.edu.

 


October Will Feature New Slate of Courses

 

September 29, 2023

 

Pamlico Community College plans to launch a fresh slate of short-term courses in October that can help men and women enhance their job skills, explore new careers and enter the local workforce.

These courses are open to adult learners. Financial aid is available for qualified students.

“As a college, we have made a commitment to growing our lineup of short-term training programs for men and women who are interested in high-demand career fields or who want to become more valuable in their current jobs,” said PCC President Dr. Jim Ross. “One of the greatest features of these Continuing Education courses is that they start at different times throughout the year, which means our college always has something new to offer students. These programs vary from hands-on courses to others than can be completed online.”

October’s schedule will include:

 

* Grant Writing, which will be offered in a Zoom-based format. It will meet Tuesdays and Thursdays from Oct. 3 to Nov. 9. Hours will be 6:30 to 8 p.m. Cost is $70.

 

* Smartphones and Tablets: iPhones, a course designed to help men and women operate their Apple devices. It’s scheduled to begin Oct. 6 and run through Nov. 10. It will meet Fridays from 1 to 3 p.m.

 

* Dialysis Technician, an evening course starting Oct. 9. It will meet from 5:30 to 9:30 p.m. Mondays and Wednesdays through Feb. 26, 2024. Cost is $180.

 

* Effective Teacher Training, a 30-hour online course that’s scheduled to start Oct. 16. Cost is $125.

 

* Medication Aide, a four-day course scheduled to start Oct. 19. Cost is $70.

 

* Forklift Training, a one-day training set for Oct. 21. Participants also will learn to use a power pallet jack. Hours are 8 a.m. to 5 p.m. Cost is $70.

 

* ServSafe, a one-day training set for Oct. 23. It will meet from 9 a.m. to 7 p.m. Cost is $70.

 

* Community Health Worker, a hybrid course scheduled to start Oct. 24. It will run through Dec. 14. Cost is $180.

 

* Notary, a one-day class scheduled for Oct. 28 in Bayboro. It will meet from 8:30 a.m. to 4:30 p.m. Cost is $70, plus a book.

 

For more information about these programs or to register, visit the Continuing Education webpage at http://www.pamlicocc.edu/programs-continuing.php, contact the college at 252-249-1851, ext. 3015, or email lgiles@pamlicocc.edu.

 


Grant Writing Course Features Zoom Format

September 18, 2023

Pamlico Community College can train men and women to secure the funding their organizations need to make a difference in the community.  The college has scheduled a virtual Grant Writing course for this fall. It will be offered in a Zoom-based format and will meet Tuesdays and Thursdays from Oct. 3 to Nov. 9.

Cost is $70. The instructor will be professional grant writer Monica Minus.

“Securing funding from public and private sources is critical for non-profits and other community organizations,” said PCC President Dr. Jim Ross.

“This course is designed to equip students with the skills they need to create successful grant applications. It will be a great course for anyone who is interested in accessing funding for great community causes.” In years past, the Grant Writing course has been offered Saturdays. This semester, college officials are experimenting with scheduling classes on Tuesdays and Thursdays from 6:30 to 8 p.m. to see if those hours better meet the needs of participants.

“We talked about developing a schedule that doesn’t take up all of the participants’ Saturdays,” said Lori Giles, the college’s chair of Continuing Education and technical programs.

“This semester’s Grant Writing course will be available during the workweek, which might be a better option for working adults. We are eager to receive input on this decision.”

The course will include information on finding funding sources, writing narratives and developing budgets. The course’s Zoom-based online format will save participants on transportation costs, organizers say.

“The non-profit sector is vital to the well-being of any thriving community, and we are honored to offer this course to help organizations succeed,” Ross said. “There is funding out there to help. This course will help your organization secure it.”

For more information or to register for either course, call 252-249-1851, ext. 3015, or email lgiles@pamlicocc.edu.

 


Continuing Education Plans Busy September

August 29, 2023

While the Fall 2023 registration period for seated and online full-term curriculum courses at Pamlico Community College has passed, there are plenty of other opportunities available this semester to enhance your job skills, explore new careers and enter the workforce.

The college plans to launch a fresh slate of short-term Continuing Education courses in health care, education, diesel mechanics and other workplace skills in September. These courses are open to adult learners. Financial aid is available for qualified students.

“Our college continues to add new vocational programs for our community to train residents for good-paying jobs that are in-demand by regional employers,” said PCC President Dr. Jim Ross.

“The PCC Continuing Education division is already off to a strong start this semester, and there’s more to come in September and in the months ahead. We have a wonderful lineup of programs scheduled for men and women who are interested in high-demand career fields or who want to become more valuable in their current jobs. The programs vary from hands-on courses to others than can be completed online.”

September’s schedule will include:

* Phlebotomy Technician, a daytime seated class starting Sept. 5. It will meet Tuesdays and Thursdays from 8:30 a.m. to 4 p.m. through Jan. 31, 2024. Cost is $180.

 

* Community Health Worker, a web-based course scheduled to start Sept. 5. It will meet from 10 a.m. to 2 p.m. Tuesdays through December. Cost is $180.

 

* Nurse Aide II, a daytime hybrid course starting Sept. 6. It will meet from 8:30 a.m. to 4 p.m. Tuesdays and Thursdays through Nov. 29. Cost is $180.

 

* Dental Billing and Coding, which is a two-part, online program starting Sept. 11. Each part costs $180.

 

* Effective Teacher Training, a 30-hour online course that’s scheduled to start Sept. 11 and end in October. Cost is $125.

 

* Marine Diesel Engines for Boaters, an evening seated course for boat owners and hobbyists that’s scheduled to start Sept. 11 and end Oct. 19. Classes will meet Mondays and Thursdays. Hours are 5 to 7 p.m. Cost is $125.

 

* Medical Office Procedures, an online course that will begin Sept. 11 and will end Jan. 26, 2024. Cost is $180.

 

* Starting Your Garden Off Right, an evening seated course that will begin Sept. 11. It will meet Mondays from 5 to 8 p.m. through Oct. 16. Cost is $70.

 

* Marine Diesel Engines for Job-Seekers, a seated course for men and women interested in a career in marine diesel engines. This course, which has a different focus than the Marine Diesel Engines for Boaters version, is scheduled to start Sept. 12 and end in October. Classes will meet Tuesdays. Hours are 5 to 8 p.m. Cost is $70.

 

* Medication Aide, a daytime seated course for current CNAs starting Sept. 14. It will meet from 9 a.m. to 3:30 p.m. Thursdays and Fridays through Sept. 22. Cost is $70.

 

* Medical Terminology, Billing and Coding, a three-part series of online courses that will begin Sept. 21. Cost is $180 per part.

 

* Forklift Training, a one-day training set for Sept. 23. Participants also will learn to use a power pallet jack. Hours are 8 a.m. to 5 p.m. Cost is $70.

 

* Notary, a one-day class scheduled for Sept. 30 in Bayboro. It will meet from 8:30 a.m. to 4:30 p.m. Cost is $70, plus a book.

More great courses are set for October!

For more information about these programs or to register, visit the Continuing Education webpage at http://www.pamlicocc.edu/programs-continuing.php, contact the college at 252-249-1851, ext. 3015, or email:lgiles@pamlicocc.edu.

 


President Encourages CCP Enrollment at PCC

August 21, 2023

Dear Pamlico County Parents,

As President of Pamlico Community College, I wish to let you and other parents of high school students know about the greatest value I have found in higher education. As your child is working with you to develop their high school class schedule for the fall, please consider an opportunity for them to take PCC college courses while still attending high school and earn full college credits without paying even one penny in tuition!

This program enables high school juniors and seniors to soon sign up to take our college classes this fall with no tuition charge. It is called the North Carolina Career & College Promise (CCP) program. Through this your child can earn most, or even all, of an associate degree from our college by the time he or she graduates from high school…and never pay a penny in tuition!

This program can give them a huge head start toward completing their bachelor’s degree by transferring the credits earned tuition-free at PCC to the university of their choice to complete the bachelor’s degree. By doing so, they can save your family tens of thousands of dollars that you would have spent for tuition!

Martin Guion, who works in the PCC Computer Services department, had his family save nearly $50,000 in tuition through this program! His three daughters took CCP courses as high school juniors and seniors and earned 45, 35, and 48 credit hours, respectively, and transferred those credits to Liberty University. Tuition for those credits would have cost nearly $50,000 at Liberty, without room and board! The daughters also saved a great deal of time. In fact, the youngest daughter earned her bachelor’s degree from Liberty at age 20.

When Riley Callahan graduated from Pamlico County High School, he took with him 50 hours of college credit to East Carolina University. His 50 hours of college credit equal a year and a half of college coursework. At ECU this would run about $11,000, without including room and board. “Take advantage of these classes,” Riley said. “They’re free and they’ll get you a head start on your future. It’s a great opportunity.”

Our program is open to local qualified students with good grades from Pamlico County High School, Arapahoe Charter School, Pamlico Christian Academy, or a home school program. I strongly encourage high school juniors and seniors to explore taking our CCP courses. These can help our local students get a college education without going deeply in debt and to get ahead fast. Please talk to your children about this.

There is truly no better bargain in higher education that I know of than tuition-free, transferable college credits. As the community college serving this wonderful community, it would give all of us here great satisfaction to know you have saved a great deal of money by taking part in this amazing opportunity.

By taking CCP classes, your child can earn PCC college credits that can be applied to an Associate in Arts degree or an Associate in Science degree that can then transfer to all state public and many private universities. Students can also earn credits in the many vocational and technical career pathways we offer.

Registration for the Fall semester is now open! Please have your child contact his or her high school guidance counselor, or contact CCP Director Derek Godwin at 252-249-1851, extension 3106, or at dgodwin@pamlicocc.eduRegistration will take place August 28 and 29 from 8 am to 3 pm at the college’s Mattocks Center in Bayboro. Please tell your loved ones about these dates!

Pamlico Community College is honored to be ranked this past year as the Number 1 community college in our nation for student success. This national ranking is from WalletHub after analyzing federal data from hundreds of outstanding community colleges across our nation. It is the second time in the past three years PCC was ranked Number 1 in the USA. This humbling honor is because of our amazing faculty and staff.

I thank God for the opportunity to serve as President the past seven years, to work with such caring and dedicated professionals, to serve such a wonderful community, and to achieve success for our students. I ask God to provide us favor as my colleagues and I seek more bold and noble goals to change many more lives.

Please contact me at jross@pamlicocc.edu or call 252-249-1851, ext. 3007, if I can ever help you in any way. Thank you for what you do as a parent, which I believe is the most important job in the world.

I wish your child a successful, safe, and healthy 2023-24 school year!

Take care,

Dr. Jim Ross

President of Pamlico Community College

 


Cosmetology Welcomes Back a Familiar Face

August 14, 2023

Pamlico Community College’s newest Cosmetology instructor wants to give back to the community by training students to help area residents look and feel their best.

Elethia Williams, a Beaufort County woman who grew up in Pamlico County and graduated in 2001 from Pamlico County High School, started her new job earlier this month.

She will teach the beginner Cosmetology courses while Instructor Debi Fulcher will handle the advanced courses. Williams replaces Instructor Christy Laney, who left the area.

Williams is eager to get started.

“I wanted to give back to the community,” she said. “I also want to instill the love of Cosmetology in students. I love Cosmetology. I love everything about it. I like all things beautiful.”

PCC President Dr. Jim Ross said the college is pleased to have Williams on board in time for the start of the Fall 2023 semester.

“Elethia Williams is a fantastic addition to our college, and we are pleased to have her with us,” he said. “She brings with her plenty of experience as an instructor and a business owner, and I know she will do an outstanding job.”

Williams, whose extended family still lives in the Vandemere area, said she first took an interest in Cosmetology as a middle schooler. She remembers styling her dolls’ hair, and then later being asked frequently by classmates to do their hair and makeup.

“It chose me,” she said with a smile. “I had a talent for it. My favorite thing to do is makeup.”

Williams was active at PCHS. She was a cheerleader, ran track and was a student government leader. After high school, she considered a military career, but then enrolled at PCC to study Cosmetology. She was among the first students to take courses in the then-new Cosmetology building in Bayboro in 2004.

Williams finished her training at Beaufort County Community College. She would go on to teach at both BCCC and as a substitute at PCC.

Williams also opened and operated a salon in Washington, first on a large scale and later in a smaller space downtown. The salon, named Hair Brows Makeup & Things Beauty Salon, sees clients by appointment, but will occasionally take walk-ins, she said.

Williams said a key step in training beginning cosmetologists is to help them get rid of their old habits and amateur ways and instead learn the proper skills and techniques used in the industry. Learning the basics and then honing their skills is a great way to start a rewarding career, she said.

“We teach them the basics,” Williams said. “It’s a learned skill. They can do it, but it takes work.”

On a personal note, Williams is engaged and has three children. She is planning a wedding in 2024, which, of course, will demand the use of her skills in hair and makeup.

In the meantime, Williams is gearing up for the new academic year at Pamlico.

“I’m excited to be back,” she said.

For more information about the college’s Cosmetology and Esthetics programs, including how to enroll, please call 252-249-1851, ext. 3130.

 


PCC Mourns the Passing of Michelle Noevere

August 11, 2023

Michelle Noevere, executive assistant to Pamlico Community College President Dr. Jim Ross and executive director of the PCC Foundation, died Monday, Aug. 7, 2023, after a courageous battle with cancer.

She grew up in Texas and was a graduate of PCC. Michelle had been named the college’s 2022-23 Staff Member of the Year in May.

In an all-employee email announcing Michelle’s passing to colleagues, Dr. Ross wrote:

Heaven has a new angel in it this morning.

I just received word that our beloved Michelle Noevere has passed away.

May God welcome our treasured colleague and dear friend to Heaven with open, comforting, and loving arms. May Michelle know how very much we all care about her, love her, and already deeply miss her.

Thank you so much to each of you who made her time with our college so joyous for her. She told me so many times how very much she enjoyed every day of working at PCC. What a blessing she was for our college for her amazing professional contributions but also because she was such an amazing, caring human being.

Her work for our college was incredible every single day of her employment. This was the case even as she fought heroically against cancer. She was incredibly positive and uplifting to others even in her most challenging days in fighting cancer.

Those of us who were allowed by God to know her during her life on earth have been made much better people because of being touched by her.

In fact, our lives will always be much better in the future because we have been blessed by knowing Michelle.

In a spirit of sincere appreciation, we thank God for allowing us to know Michelle. We thank Him for allowing our world to have this angel amidst us. She made our college so much better and made our world so much better.

It is now time for Heaven to welcome its newest angel.

May God be with all her family members now and always.

May God be with you— her treasured PCC family members— and your loved ones now and always.

Michelle, we love you now and always,

Jim Ross

A link to Michelle’s obituary

 


Fall Registration Now Underway at Pamlico

August 8, 2023

Registration for the Fall 2023 semester is underway at Pamlico Community College!

Faculty members and Student Services staffers are meeting with new and returning students this week to sign them up for curriculum courses, give them information about financial aid opportunities and provide them with advice and suggestions about their educational options.

However, if you are unable to get to campus this week, you’ll still be able to sign up for curriculum courses in the days ahead so you can get started on your academic journey this semester.

Seated courses will begin Aug. 14. Online classes will start Aug. 30.

Looking ahead, registration for Career & College Promise courses for high school juniors and seniors is scheduled for Aug. 28 and 29 from 8 a.m. to 3 p.m. at the Mattocks Center in Bayboro.

“Registration is a very exciting and optimistic time at Pamlico Community College,” said PCC President Dr. Jim Ross. “We want to make the registration process positive and convenient. We know many of our students have other responsibilities and demands on their time. That’s why we try to be flexible with people and treat them with respect and compassion.”

A friendly, supportive atmosphere is what new and returning students can expect to find at the college. WalletHub has ranked Pamlico the No. 1 community college in America for student success, and the college’s faculty and staff are here to help men and women reach their educational goals for Fall 2023 and beyond.

“Pamlico Community College offers a nationally recognized education, but we also offer a welcoming environment for students,” Ross said. “We invite area residents to check out what we have to offer for the Fall 2023 semester and to join us for the new academic year.”

For more information about registration, including financial aid and course selection, email studentservices@pamlicocc.edu, call 252-249-1851, ext. 3001, or visit Student Services in the Johnson Building on campus.

 


Seniors Eligible for Free Computer Class

July 18, 2023

There’s still time for adults ages 65 and older to enroll in Pamlico Community College’s free Basic Computers for Seniors course. Two sections of the popular course will begin in August.

The course, which is offered at the college’s Grantsboro campus, teaches senior adults the basics of operating a computer, including how to send emails, use the Internet and navigate software programs.

One session will begin Tuesday, Aug. 8, and will run through Dec. 5. It will meet from 9 a.m. to noon on Tuesdays.

A second session will start for Thursday, Aug. 17, and will run through Jan. 4, 2024. It will meet from 9 a.m. to noon on Thursdays.

PCC is able to offer this course to men and women 65 and older at no charge through an ongoing partnership with Agape Love in Action, Inc., which is an organization led by Corliss Udoema.

“We are proud of this course and of our partnership with Agape Love in Action,” said PCC President Dr. Jim Ross. “PCC is a place for everyone to learn something new. I encourage senior adults to check out this course.”

PCC Chair of Continuing Education and Technical Programs Lori Giles said the course helps to demystify computers and the Internet for men and women who have not had experience with them.

“It’s exciting to see people who never thought they’d be able to use a computer to do so and to be comfortable with it,” she said. “The classes have a relaxed atmosphere, and participants have a great time.”

Students younger than 65 also can enroll in the course, but must pay the $70 fee.

For more information about the course or to register, please call 252-249-1851, ext. 3015.

 


PCC Helps Students Secure Financial Aid

June 26, 2023

The time between the end of the previous academic year and the start of the Fall 2023 semester is a great time for new and returning students to make sure they have the financial aid they need to enroll in courses at Pamlico Community College.

In other words, that time is now!

Director of Financial Aid Gretchen Steiger and the college’s Student Services staff are available to help men and women complete the enrollment process before the Registration rush in August.

That process includes helping students find and secure the financial help they need.

“Pamlico Community College is blessed to be able to offer financial aid from a number of sources, including federal funds, state grants and local scholarships,” said PCC President Dr. Jim Ross. “Don’t let a lack of financial resources stop you from reaching your educational goals. I would urge anyone who is considering enrolling in college for the upcoming Fall 2023 semester to contact us as soon as possible to see how we can help.”

Financial aid sources include Pell grants, Federal Supplemental Education Opportunity grants, Federal Work-Study programs, Workforce Innovation and Opportunity Act (WIOA) funds and state grants. Additionally, the college has several local and institutional scholarships available for students who qualify, thanks to generous donors to the Pamlico Community College Foundation.

To determine your eligibility for many of these options, you will need to complete a Free Application for Federal Student Aid (FAFSA) form. The FAFSA is available at www.studentaid.gov.

PCC also is able to certify for VA Education Benefits. Only eligible veterans, dependents or active duty service members who have obtained eligibility with VA (or have received advance approval from their ESO or service if using Tuition Assistance) can utilize VA Education Benefits.

“The college has several financial aid opportunities and resources available to assist students in achieving their educational goals,” Steiger said. “Students can find information about these in the Financial Aid section of the college’s website at www.pamlicocc.edu.”

She continued, “To ensure consideration for scholarships and other awards, students should complete their 2023-24 FAFSA and turn in any other required documents by Aug. 9. Students can reach out to me to set up an appointment for assistance or with any questions about available opportunities at gsteiger@pamlicocc.edu or 252-249-1851, ext. 3026.”

Ross said the college is a great place for men and women to secure the education they need to improve their lives.

“Pamlico Community College is a wonderful place to discover a great career field or to get started on earning a four-year degree,” Ross said. “We are honored to be recognized as the top community college in America for student success, based on U.S. Department of Education data, and our tuition and fees are far lower than public or private universities. Contact the college today to see how we can match you with the resources you need to achieve your goals and dreams!”

 


Continuing Education Offers Summer Courses

June 12, 2023

Pamlico Community College’s Continuing Education division is staying busy this Summer with a slate of short-term, hands-on training courses designed to help men and women enhance their job prospects, become more valuable in their current posts and develop more self-reliance.

The courses include popular offerings in health care as well as hands-on classes in diesel mechanics and forklift training.

Two new sections of PCC’s popular Basic Computers for Seniors are also on tap.

“Staffers in our Continuing Education division are always looking to meet the needs of area employers and the community,” said PCC President Dr. Jim Ross. “They stay flexible, which makes them able to set up short-term training courses quickly to meet emerging trends. I encourage residents to see what we’re offering in the weeks ahead.”

Upcoming courses include:

 

* Marine Diesel for Boaters and Marine Diesel for Job-Seekers, which are scheduled to begin in July.

Instructor Stanley Feigenbaum of Pamlico County has created one course specifically for boat owners who wish to learn more about maintaining their vessels’ diesel engines. It is scheduled to begin Monday, July 10.

Feigenbaum also has created a separate course for men and women who are interested in maintaining marine diesel engines as a career. That course is scheduled to begin Tuesday, July 11.

 

* Forklift Training, a one-day class on Saturday, July 15, at the PCC campus in Grantsboro. Learn the basics of safely operating a forklift with this $70 course.

 

* Notary, a one-day course in Bayboro on Saturday, July 29.

 

* Basic Computers for Seniors, PCC’s popular free course for adults ages 65 and older. There will be two sections of the course – one will begin Tuesday, Aug. 8, and the other will start Thursday, Aug. 17.

The course, which teach adults the basics of operating a computer, is available through an ongoing collaboration with Agape Love in Action, Inc.

* ServSafe, a one-day training for food service workers, on Monday, Aug. 14. It will meet from 9 a.m. to 7 p.m. Cost is $70.

 

* Medication Aide, a short-term course for current CNAs, starting Aug. 16.

 

* Electronic Health Records, an online course designed to train individuals to maintain electronic and printed medical records. It’s scheduled to begin Monday, Aug. 21. Cost is $180, plus a book.

* Medical Billing and Coding, a three-part online course designed to train entry-level medical billers and coders. The course starts Monday, Aug. 21. Each part costs $180, plus books.

 

* Nurse Aide I, an evening hybrid course starting Aug. 22.

 

* Pharmacy Technician, a hybrid course coming Aug. 24. Cost will be $180.

For more information about any of these courses or to register, please contact PCC’s Lori Giles at 252-249-1851, ext. 3015, or lgiles@pamlicocc.edu.

 


High-Achieving Stowe Wants to Help Others

June 5, 2023

Pamlico Community College graduate Mariah Stowe has the right prescription for success: Find something you want to do and then work as hard as you can to make it happen in short order.

That’s the way the 18-year-old Grantsboro woman has lived her young life, and it’s the right remedy to help her reach her goals of becoming a registered nurse and, eventually, a nurse practitioner.

The soft-spoken teenager, who recently earned her Associate in Arts degree with honors from PCC even before she graduates from Pamlico County High School, is the recipient of the college’s 2023 Academic Excellence Award and has been named PCC’s 2023 Student of the Year.

Stowe’s selection for the college’s top student prizes was announced during PCC’s 2023 Commencement ceremony May 12.

“I was definitely surprised,” she said with a chuckle.

For their part, instructors, friends and others who know Stowe say they weren’t surprised at all. Stowe has been taking on challenges and exceeding expectations for a while, they say.

“Mariah Stowe impresses me as someone who maximizes her time and looks for opportunities to excel,” said PCC President Dr. Jim Ross. “She has worked extremely hard in the tuition-free, college-level courses PCC offers high school juniors and seniors through the N.C. Career & College Promise program, and she has been rewarded by becoming one of six Class of 2023 PCHS seniors to receive their associate degrees during the same year they graduate from high school.”

The president continued, “She has the drive and determination she needs to succeed in her next challenge and beyond. All of us at PCC are very proud of Mariah and look forward to seeing what her bright future holds.”

Stowe grew up in Pamlico County and attended the county’s public schools. She has always done well in the classroom, even though high school algebra gave her a little trouble.

While attending Pamlico County High School, Stowe noticed how an older schoolmate, Sarah Henries, was able to take college-level courses from PCC and earn transferable college credits at no charge through the Career & College Promise (CCP) program.

“That was really what pushed me,” she said. “I was driven by her experiences and what I saw could happen, and then I saw myself in that place and how happy I would be.”

Encouraged by PCC Instructor Derek Godwin, who oversees the CCP program, and PCC Vice President of Instructional Services Michelle Willis, Stowe took on multiple college-level courses and thrived. She said her time in PCHS health science courses confirmed her desire to become a nurse, and the free college courses helped her complete prerequisite classes she would need.

Always looking to stay ahead, Stowe and a high school classmate took a Nurse Aide I course through the college’s Continuing Education division. Her experience in that course and its clinical component showed her she was on the right track.

“It’s definitely not for the weak,” she said. “But I was able to see through clinicals how much you can help people. It’s a good way to get out there and do your part.”

It’s important to Stowe that she do her part to help others. She said her younger brother’s experience with caring, compassionate health care providers showed her the difference individuals can make in the lives of a patient and his or her family – and that’s what she wants to do, too.

Godwin praised Stowe for her commitment to her studies and for her determination to succeed.

“Mariah’s remarkable accomplishment of receiving PCC’s Academic Excellence Award serves as a testament to her exceptional intellectual abilities, remarkable drive and unwavering commitment to academic excellence,” he said. “It has truly been an inspiration to watch her journey these past two years as a Career & College Promise student.”

During the May 12 Commencement ceremony, Vice President of Student Services Jamie Gibbs presented Stowe with a plaque and a medallion for her awards. As the recipient of the Academic Excellence Award, she became Pamlico’s 2023 honoree in the N.C. Community College System’s “Great within the 58” list of high-achieving students.

Stowe’s next stop will be Craven Community College in New Bern, where she has enrolled in the Associate Degree Nursing (ADN) program. Her classes will begin in August.

She has the support and guidance of her family, including her mother, who is a PCC graduate. Stowe also has the knowledge that she has a leg up on her future, thanks in large part to the CCP program.

“Mariah has a big head start on her goals, thanks to the Career & College Promise program,” Ross said. “I often say it’s the best bargain in higher education.”

For more information about how high school juniors and seniors can take college-level courses tuition-free through PCC, please contact Derek Godwin at 252-249-1851, ext. 3106, or dgodwin@pamlicocc.edu.

 


PCC Seeks to Build Ties with FRC East

May 22, 2023

Leaders from Pamlico Community College, Fleet Readiness Center East and the Pamlico County Schools met May 22 to discuss ways to build partnerships and to create training pathways that lead to good-paying jobs for local students and residents at nearby Cherry Point.

“Our college strongly believes in partnering and making our community better,” said PCC President Dr. Jim Ross as he welcomed FRC East officials and representatives of the local public schools to the Delamar Center and praised each organization for their contributions to making lives better. “This is an important issue for our college to enter into this partnership with you.”

Ross went on to acknowledge the importance of the exemplary partnerships PCC has with community businesses, organizations, and non-profits and how this has helped the college better serve the community.

“We are thankful for today’s meeting as a very positive step to preparing Pamlico County residents for good local careers at Fleet Readiness Center East,” he said.

Michelle Willis, the college’s vice president of instructional services, said PCC and FRC East formerly had an apprenticeship program for the college’s Electrical Systems Technology students. Reinvigorating that and other learning partnerships would benefit Pamlico County students and residents, she said.

“We look forward to finding out what we can do to help our students and our residents get the training they need to go to Cherry Point and work,” Willis said.

FRC East is based at Marine Corps Air Station Cherry Point in nearby Havelock. The facility employs about 4,000 people in the critical national security work of repairing and updating military aircraft.

Michelle Smith, STEM and Education Outreach Coordinator for FRC East, said she hoped the meeting would open lines of communication between FRC East, the college and the school system so new and productive partnerships could be explored.

“I’m a former teacher,” she said. “I want successful students.”

Following the initial session, FRC East representatives briefly toured the college’s facilities and heard from PCC officials about the programs and training courses available. The May 22 meeting had been organized after Smith and Willis struck up a conversation at a recent Career Fair at Pamlico County High School in Bayboro.

 


Graduation Ceremony Honors Class of 2023

May 15, 2023

Goals were accomplished, tassels were turned and new life adventures got underway during Pamlico Community College’s 56th Commencement Exercises Friday, May 12, at the Delamar Center.

The mood at the evening event was joyous, with hundreds of family members, friends and community leaders on hand to salute the graduates for their achievements.

“You did it, didn’t you? You did it!” PCC President Dr. Jim Ross told the graduates, many of whom achieved their educational goals while balancing family demands, work and other commitments. “We’re so proud of you.”

The president and others also congratulated the graduates’ family members and friends and thanked them for their encouragement and support.

Sixty of the 133 men and women who qualified for recognition over the last year in the college’s curriculum and Continuing Education programs took part in the ceremony. Overall, the Class of 2023 earned a combined 184 academic and Continuing Education credentials, including 37 associate degrees, 10 diplomas, 55 certificates and 82 Continuing Education recognitions.

Cecilia A. “Candy” Bohmert, current vice chair of the Pamlico County Board of Commissioners and a member of the college’s Board of Trustees, gave the Commencement address. A 1996 graduate of the college, she encouraged the graduates to remain optimistic and to be open to new learning opportunities.

“When I graduated, I was 40. You’re not done yet,” Bohmert said.

She urged the graduates to keep chasing their dreams, even if it takes a while. Bohmert recounted how she almost didn’t pursue a job with the local Soil and Water Conservation District, but was encouraged to go after it by her husband.

Bohmert got the job, and “for 20 years, I lived my dream,” she said.

“Don’t despise your small beginnings,” Bohmert told the graduates, urging them to remain open to new things, to accept help and to surround themselves with people who want to see them succeed.

With the right education, attitude and people around them, members of the PCC Class of 2023 can do anything, she said.

“Leadership is all about influence,” Bohmert said. “You can change things. Don’t limit yourself by saying you can’t.”

Later in the ceremony, the college honored Mariah Stowe as its Academic Excellence Award recipient and Student of the Year. The 18-year-old Stowe is a senior at Pamlico County High School. She earned an Associate in Arts degree from the college through the N.C. Career & College Promise program and also completed a PCC Nurse Aide I training course, all before she is scheduled to receive her high school diploma.

Stowe was one of six PCHS seniors who were recognized for earning their Associate in Arts degrees the same year they earn their high school diplomas.

PCC Electrical Systems Technology Instructor Larry Monk was honored as the college’s Alumnus of the Year. Monk graduated from the program he now leads. He also was recognized for his work as a foster parent and youth coach.

Following the award presentations, the graduates were called across the stage one-by-one to receive their credentials and to pose for a free photo with Ross.

PCC Instructor Ronald Scott announced the names. When the graduates had received their respective credentials, PCC Vice President of Instruction Michelle Willis-Krauss pronounced them graduated and instructed them to turn their tassels as the audience cheered.

This year’s graduates completed their studies in an academic year when PCC was recognized once again as America’s No. 1 community college for student success by WalletHub. The college has been honored with that title in two of the last three years.

PCC Trustee Ann Holton gave the welcome message at the ceremony, and pianist Paula Murray provided the music.

An outdoor reception with refreshments followed the ceremony. As in years past, a professional photographer was available to take free family portraits for the graduates and their loved ones.

 


PCC Awards Presented at Celebratory Lunch

May 11, 2023

PCC colleagues gathered in the Delamar Center Tuesday, May 9, to celebrate a year of multiple successes, to honor the college’s top employees for 2022-23 and to enjoy a delicious lunch.

In years past, most college awards for employees were presented at Commencement. In 2020 and 2021 during the worst of the COVID-19 pandemic, the presentations were online.

This year, the presentation of the annual awards was the centerpiece of an all-employee meeting designed for colleagues to look back on the academic year and to enjoy each other’s company.

“Today is going to be a day of celebration,” said PCC President Dr. Jim Ross shortly before introducing Community Living student Sarah Vieregge, who sang “The Star-Spangled Banner” to open the event.

In opening remarks, the president introduced Lee Tillman, who has been hired as the college’s new vice president of financial services, and he led employees in a raucous chant of “We are PCC!” as he spoke about the college’s mission to help men and women improve their lives.

The day’s first award – Instructor of the Year – went to Welding Instructor Joe Flynn. Ross said Flynn is known for his attention to detail, and he added Flynn does an outstanding job preparing students for real world workplaces.

“Our college is so much better because of you,” Ross said.

Flynn, whose wife, Tammy, was on hand for the event, joked the scoring used to select him must be incorrect as he thanked the group for the honor.

The Pamlico Correctional Institution Instructor of the Year Award went to Horticulture Instructor Ed King. He also received the honor in 2017.

“You never expect to get these things, but it’s nice when it comes from people you work with,” King said as he accepted the award.

This year’s Adjunct Instructor of the Year Award went to part-time English Instructor Brent Canle.

Ross officially notified Canle of his selection through an online video chat on Instructor Neil Callahan’s phone during the ceremony. The instructor said he enjoyed working with students.

Custodian Lana Green again was recognized for the President’s Award, which Ross first announced via an online video call from Texas last December.

“I’d like to thank God for this,” she said, adding it was an honor to be considered for the award.

Ross also announced a new award – the President’s Department of the Year Award – would go this year to Computer Services (IT). Like the President’s Award for an individual, the new honor recognizes departments that are positive, professional and productive.

The president confessed he had been worried about the department’s future following the retirement of Scott Frazer, but was exceedingly pleased with how the remaining teammates came together and carried on under the leadership of Martin Guion.

“They are a fantastic model for this college,” Ross said.

Joining Guion in receiving the departmental award were Gregory Davis, Nick Goodwin, Ya Min and Christy Wicks.

This year’s Staff Member of the Year Award went to Michelle Noevere, the president’s executive assistant and executive director of the PCC Foundation. She remains hospitalized in Chapel Hill following a stem cell treatment, but was able to participate in the ceremony via an online video chat.

“There’s no one in this nation that I would rather have in this role than Michelle,” Ross said.

For her part, Noevere thanked Ross for being a friendly and kind mentor. She also said she enjoyed coming to work and giving her best with colleagues at an organization that improved people’s lives.

In his concluding remarks, Ross thanked everyone for their hard work, dedication and caring attitudes over the last year, adding the efforts paid off in PCC’s recognition by WalletHub as the No. 1 community college in America for students’ educational outcomes and on the college’s successful SACSCOC reaffirmation visit.

He said enrollment had begun to grow again after the COVID-19 pandemic. In fact, Pamlico had the 10th highest increase in the state community college system this year, Ross said.

He also said he was honored and pleased that employee morale had remained high in recent years – something that the president believes leads to great things.

After briefly touching on his advocacy for the college with the N.C. General Assembly and the N.C. Department of Corrections, Ross, whose employment contract recently was extended for four years by the Board of Trustees, said he was excited about PCC’s future.

“This is what I want to do: To work with others to change lives,” he said. “Our college has such great days ahead of us. I am an unwavering optimist about the future.”

Employees then participated in a singalong of the Beatles’ hit “Here Comes the Sun.”

The lunchtime meal was catered by Nest Café, which is operated by a former Pamlico Correctional Institution offender. Instructor Ronald Scott offered the blessing before the meal.

 


College to Host 2023 Commencement Friday

May 8, 2023

The most joyous day of Pamlico Community College’s year is almost here!

The college will host its 2023 Commencement Exercises on Friday, May 12, beginning at 6:30 p.m. at the Ned Everett Delamar Center on the college’s Grantsboro campus.

One hundred thirty-two men and women in the college’s curriculum and Continuing Education programs have qualified for recognition over the last year. Those students have earned a combined 183 academic and Continuing Education credentials, including 37 associate degrees, 10 diplomas, 54 certificates and 82 Continuing Education recognitions.

Six students will be receiving two associate’s degrees each, and six Pamlico County High School seniors will be recognized for earning their Associate in Arts degrees the same year they will graduate from high school.

“All of us at the college are extremely excited about Commencement,” Ross said. “Like last year, we will be indoors at the Delamar Center for a full ceremony. We anticipate the event will be very inspiring. It gives all of us an opportunity to congratulate our graduates for their accomplishments, and it is the perfect occasion to salute their families for the sacrifices they have made to help our students achieve their goals.”

Ross will be presiding over his seventh Commencement as the college’s president. Cecilia A. “Candy” Bohmert, current vice chair of the Pamlico County Board of Commissioners and a member of the college’s Board of Trustees, will give the Commencement address.

Bohmert has a long-standing relationship with the college. In addition to her current service as a trustee, she earned an associate degree in Environmental Science Technology from PCC in 1996 and was honored as the college’s Alumnus of the Year in 2019.

“Candy Bohmert is an outstanding friend of our college, and we look forward to hearing what she has to say to the graduates,” Ross said.

The Class of 2023’s youngest graduate is 17, and the oldest graduate is 63.

All of this year’s graduates will be completing their studies in an academic year when PCC was recognized once again as America’s No. 1 community college for student success by WalletHub. The college has been honored with that title in two of the last three years.

During the ceremony, the college’s Academic Excellence Award/Student of the Year winner will be announced. Four students have been nominated this year. The college also will honor its Alumnus of the Year.

A reception with refreshments will follow the ceremony.

As in years past, the college has hired a professional photographer to take free family portraits for the graduates and their loved ones. Each complimentary portrait will be available to take home that night.

 


Six PCHS Seniors on Track to Get Degrees

CCP Student with Dr. Ross

May 1, 2023

“Six amazing high school seniors are making Pamlico Community College history this year,” stated PCC President Dr. Jim Ross. “They are on track to soon earn their PCC Associate in Arts degrees, meaning they will do so during the same academic year they will graduate from Pamlico County High School.”

He continued, “These hard-working, outstanding students will gain tremendous advantages in jump-starting their careers and saving thousands of dollars in tuition costs by taking advantage of the biggest bargain in higher education. I look forward to presenting their college diplomas to them on May 12 at the PCC Commencement ceremony.”

The six students – all young women – have been able to accomplish this feat by taking tuition-free, college-level courses from PCC through the N.C. Career & College Promise program.

The credits earned by the high-achieving half-dozen counted both toward their high school diplomas and toward their associate degrees at PCC. These transferable college credits also give them a significant head start over their peers as they enroll in four-year universities or in other professional programs – and it didn’t cost any of them a dime.

“In years past, PCC has had high school students qualify for their associate degrees in the same year they receive their high school diplomas, but to have six students reach this tremendous goal in one year is something entirely unprecedented in our college’s history,” Ross said. “We are so proud of these students and their remarkable accomplishments. We know the future is bright for all six of these young women, and I think their story demonstrates the tremendous opportunities available to local high schoolers through the Career & College Promise program.”

The “starting five” of the group – Taylor Buck, Alessandra De La Cruz-Cornelio, Andrea Lopez, Mariah Stowe and De’yana Thomas – will complete their college coursework in May, meaning they will receive their associate degrees before they get their high school diplomas.

The sixth member of the team, Stephanie Harris, is on track to finish her final AA courses this summer.

All six are qualified to participate in the college’s Commencement ceremony May 12 at the Delamar Center.

In a recent interview, the six students said they had known one another since childhood, and all six had attended the same four Pamlico County public schools – Pamlico Primary, Fred A. Anderson Elementary, Pamlico County Middle School and Pamlico County High School – during their careers.

They said they learned about the tuition-free CCP program from their parents and other family members. Some said their moms were insistent they give the courses a try. Lopez said her cousins, who took several courses, “wished they had taken more.”

The students said they were attracted to the college-level courses, which are offered in both seated and online formats, because they would help them get ahead in their studies and qualify them for transferable college credits tuition-free. Earning their associate degrees also helped to set them apart from their high school classmates, the women said, adding members of their high school class were competitive and strong academically.

“If you wanted to be among those on top, you had to find a way,” Stowe said.

Buck plans to study elementary education at East Carolina University. She will be part of the university’s Living-Learning Community for first-year education students.

De La Cruz-Cornelio also will enroll at East Carolina University, where she plans to study psychology. She hopes to earn a master’s degree and become an occupational therapist.

It’s a Carolina blue future for Lopez, who will attend the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill and will study political science. She hopes to attend law school and become an immigration attorney.

Stowe, Harris and Thomas, who, at 17, is the youngest of the six, plan to become registered nurses.

Thomas, essentially a college junior at age 17, is headed to N.C. A&T State University in Greensboro. Harris and Stowe plan to attend Craven Community College.

Always looking to stay ahead, both Stowe and Thomas already have taken and passed a Nurse Aide I course through PCC’s Continuing Education division.

The women say taking and passing PCC college-level courses will help them to avoid some of their respective programs’ prerequisite courses – many of which are often difficult to get into and are offered only in huge lecture halls.

It took hard work and discipline to earn associate degrees while in high school. They often took large course loads, including during Summer Terms, all the while balancing their high school work and other responsibilities.

The experience likely prepared them for their upcoming lives as full-time college students.

“You get treated like an adult,” Lopez said. The others agreed, saying they’ve realized they have to rely on themselves – not their mothers, professors or anyone else – to remind them to do assignments, to meet deadlines and to stay motivated.

Derek Godwin, who oversees the CCP program, said the women deserve recognition for their hard work.

“They are all great kids,” he said. “They have impressed me with their work ethic and their willingness to take on challenges. I am certain they will be very successful at the next level.”

Group members are looking forward to both their college and high school graduation ceremonies, although it can be difficult to explain to family members exactly how they’re getting recognized for earning their college degrees before their high school diplomas.

“It feels backwards telling family that,” Thomas said with a chuckle.

Ross said the college is proud of all students who will graduate on May 12. “We commend each of our graduates for working hard, overcoming many obstacles, and persevering to reach this important milestone in their lives.”

For more information about the Career & College Promise program at PCC, call 252-249-1851, ext. 3106, or email dgodwin@pamlicocc.edu.

 


Tuition-Free Courses Set for CCP Students

Summer CCP Classes

April 24, 2023

Summer is a time for relaxing in the sun and having some fun, but it’s also a time when motivated high school students can get ahead in their studies. Pamlico Community College can help!

The college will be offering a robust slate of tuition-free University Transfer courses in an online format this summer.

The courses, which are available through the Career & College Promise (CCP) program, are specifically for rising high school seniors (current juniors who will be seniors in 2023-24) and for graduating Class of 2023 seniors who still will be in high school by the PCC class start date, which is May 22.

Enrolling in and passing one or more of these courses is a fantastic way to secure transferable college credit at no charge, PCC leaders say.

“We are excited about this opportunity for students,” said PCC President Dr. Jim Ross. “The CCP program is a remarkable value for Pamlico County families with some students actually earning their PCC college degree free of charge at the same time they earn their high school diploma!”

The president continued, “I strongly believe every eligible high school student should strive to take as many of our CCP classes as possible. This will give them a head start on gaining college credits, and the classes are free! I enjoyed teaching a class to them last year and was impressed by the students’ intelligence and commitment as well as how very much they progressed during the year.”

Neil Callahan, the college’s coordinator of academic advising, said, “Current CCP students who are rising seniors and those graduating in June have a unique opportunity to take advantage of transferable course offerings at PCC this summer. For rising seniors, you can get a head start on finishing up your CCP Transfer Pathway. For graduating seniors, you can gain a few extra courses to take with you when you apply to four-year institutions. The best part of all of this is that these courses are tuition-free. Save money before you go off to college!”

The list of courses includes nearly two dozen popular online offerings, including essential classes in Art Appreciation, Biology, Chemistry, English, History, Computer Science, Mathematics, Psychology and more.

The approved credits earned by passing these courses can be used toward a degree at PCC or can be transferred to the state’s public universities. Several private colleges and universities in North Carolina also accept these credits.

“Earning tuition-free college credits while in high school is a wonderful thing,” Ross said. “These Summer School courses will enable motivated high school students to earn credits in the same way. I encourage eligible high schoolers to take advantage of this opportunity.”

For more information or to register for PCC’s Summer School University Transfer courses, please contact Derek Godwin at 252-249-1851, ext. 3106, or dgodwin@pamlicocc.edu.

 


Local Educator Joins PCC Board of Trustees

March 29, 2023

A self-described “lifelong learner” who spent more than three decades working in public education is the newest member of the Pamlico Community College Board of Trustees.

Sherry G. Meador, who retired in 2021 after a 33-year career as a classroom teacher, school administrator and central office leader in Pamlico County and elsewhere, has been appointed by the Pamlico County Board of Education to serve out the unexpired term of the late Larry Prescott.

Meador, who attended her first board meeting March 28, said she expected her career in public education to help her in her new role as a PCC trustee.

“I know the language and I know the processes,” she said. “And I think once you stop learning, you stop living.”

Bob Lyon, chairman of the college’s Board of Trustees, said he is pleased to have Meador join the board.

“I’ve known her many years. She is a fine person,” he said. “She will be a great asset to our board. She has worked with children and she has worked in administration with the school system. That will be a help for us.”

PCC President Dr. Jim Ross said he expects Meador to be an excellent member of the PCC Board of Trustees.

“I am very impressed with her,” he said. “Her love of learning and love of education with serve our college well.”

Meador was born in Elizabeth City and grew up in Manteo. After graduating as salutatorian from Manteo High School in 1985, she enrolled at Appalachian State University in Boone, where she earned a bachelor’s degree in K-12 special education.

“I wanted to be an advocate for students,” Meador said. “I was a lover of learning and I wanted everybody to have the same chance to learn.”

After teaching in Randleman, Greensboro and Clayton, Meador followed her husband, Rusty Meador, in 1991 to Pamlico County, where Rusty, a North Carolina Wildlife Resources Commission officer, had been assigned. She was hired by the Pamlico County Schools and began a long career in the system.

Along the way, she earned her certification to teach math – which included taking courses at PCC – and later her master’s degree in school administration from East Carolina University, which enabled her to take work as an assistant principal and principal at the middle school and at Fred A. Anderson Elementary School.

Later in her career, she held central office posts with ever-expanding roles in curriculum, instruction, accountability, professional development, school improvement and more.

“I’m a good multi-tasker,” Meador said with a smile. “You just do it.”

She has been recognized for excellence, earning honors as Teacher of the Year and Principal of the Year. Additionally, Meador received the Order of the Long Leaf Pine from the Governor’s Office.

Now retired, she enjoys finding and making crafts with sea glass, reading, cooking and taking short trips with her husband and friends on their personal watercrafts.

The Meadors live with their five dogs in the Dawson Creek area. They have two grown children.

The PCC Board of Trustees is made up of 12 members. Four members are appointed by the Governor’s Office, four are appointed by the Pamlico County Board of Commissioners and four are appointed by the Pamlico County Board of Education.

 


PCC Seeks to Double Vocational Programs

March 29, 2023

Pamlico Community College President Dr. Jim Ross strongly believes the college must do even more to provide programs to prepare local residents for careers where they can work with their hands in vocational, technical and Allied Health fields.

Ross has made this a top priority since becoming PCC president six years ago because these jobs are plentiful, pay great wages, and are desperately needed by businesses in Eastern North Carolina. He cites strong national trends that show adult learners want short-term training programs that can qualify them for positions in high growth sectors of the economy such as health care.

PCC faculty and staffers have successfully responded to the President’s priority and added 20 short-term, hands-on training programs the past five years in skilled trades, Allied Health and other in-demand careers.

“We have been very aggressive in launching hands-on training programs that can be completed quickly and that can lead to good-paying jobs in health care and other important fields,” Ross said. “We have identified this as a college priority for the good it can do for our community and have added nearly two dozen programs over the last five years – and for the good of our community we’re just getting started.”

A task force Ross established last year documented 28 new vocational programs in addition to those already established that are needed, and Ross has made this a top priority for the college to achieve. PCC now is committed to doubling the number of its vocational and technical programs and doubling its Allied Health programs.

Ross is enthused to pursue the challenges in gaining funding to accomplish this. His enthusiasm and optimism are based on the tremendous good that will come to our community from this.

“We are pursuing a bold and noble goal to double the number of our vocational programs and double the number of our Allied Health programs in order to help make many more Pamlico citizens’ lives better. We pray for success in doing so because many local lives will be made so much better by achieving this,” he said. “In addition, our college and those that provide funding for this will be addressing severe shortages that businesses have in our state in finding well-trained employees in the vocational, technical and Allied Health fields.”

Pamlico Community College is one of America’s most-honored community colleges in the past five years. For example, PCC is currently ranked number 1 in the United States in student success among all community colleges. This prestigious ranking comes from WalletHub as it analyzed extensive data in student education outcomes from the U.S. Department of Education. This is the second time in the past three years that PCC has earned the number 1 ranking in the nation.

Ross has consistently given enthusiastic credit to “the caring and dedicated PCC employees for the great work they do” as the reason for the multitude of national and state awards the college has almost continuously earned the past five years.

The college is currently enrolling students for one of its newest Allied Health programs – Electronic Health Records. It’s an online program that trains individuals to maintain manual and electronic health records and to use them for data collection and analysis, data sources/sets, archival systems and more. It is scheduled to begin April 17.

In vocational and technical courses, PCC plans to offer new sections of its popular one-day Forklift Training course as well as the ServSafe food safety course. Both courses are scheduled for April.

For more information about upcoming courses at the college, please call 252-249-1851, ext. 3015, email lgiles@pamlicocc.edu or visit http://www.pamlicocc.edu/programs-continuing.php on the web.

 


Golden LEAF Supports Allied Health Project

Dr. Ross, Continuing Education student and Lori Giles

February 27, 2023

Pamlico Community College will use $500,000 in recently announced funding from the Golden LEAF Foundation to transform the former boat-building shop in the Johnson Building into a versatile classroom and lab space for its ever-growing list of short-term Allied Health programs.

Plans call for renovating the vacant, roughly 2,000-square-foot space and installing important instructional equipment, supplies and technology to train men and women for in-demand health care jobs in Pamlico County and the region.

PCC President Dr. Jim Ross welcomed the generous support, saying it would accelerate the college’s ongoing efforts to offer a wider range of short-term, hands-on Continuing Education programs to meet the needs of adult learners and local employers.

“These funds will allow us to serve our community even better through one of our top priorities I identified when I became president six years ago – that of offering more and better Continuing Education Allied Health programs and other options to our community,” he said. “Our college deeply appreciates the funding decision from Golden LEAF to provide this $500,000 for this important purpose. We are honored to have developed a positive working relationship with Golden LEAF.”

Golden LEAF President and Chief Executive Officer Scott T. Hamilton said, “Golden LEAF is pleased to support the growth of Pamlico Community College’s Continuing Education and health care programs to meet the needs of local employers. Developing a prepared workforce is key to the long-term economic advancement of Pamlico County and the region.”

Under Ross’s leadership and at the recommendation of a presidential task force, PCC has added more than 20 short-term programs and courses in Allied Health and other areas in recent years, including Dialysis Technician, Physical Therapy Technician, Pharmacy Technician, Community Health Worker and others.

The renovated space will provide additional flexibility and will lead to additional program offerings, said Lori Giles, the college’s chair of Continuing Education and Technical Programs.

“This generous Golden LEAF investment will allow our college to create a contemporary, multi-disciplinary laboratory space to provide interactive health care occupations instruction,” she said. “We have needed some additional space to grow, and this will be a tremendous help. We are honored to receive this funding, as this will allow us to expand current health care offerings and initiate new programs.”

Beyond Allied Health, PCC also has added additional short-term, hands-on programs in Plumbing, HVAC, Solar Energy and Sustainable Agriculture, with plans to add more in the short term.

Ross said national trends indicate students want to explore short-term training options that can lead to good-paying jobs, and Pamlico Community College stands ready to meet that need.

“Our college has dramatically increased the number of short-term Continuing Education programs in Allied Health, vocational and technical areas in recent years, and we plan to continue,” he said. “Imagine the number of families we can help in our region when we do so.”

Ross reiterated his thanks to Golden LEAF for its support, and he also thanked Pamlico County officials for their work in helping the college secure the funding.

“I appreciate very much Pamlico County Manager Tim Buck and his team recommending our college to Golden LEAF to receive this funding,” he said. “The Pamlico County commissioners and Tim Buck are incredible friends of our college and of our entire community.”

 


US Congressman Visits PCC Students, Leaders

Dr. Ross and Congressman Murphy

February 16, 2023

U.S. Rep. Greg Murphy and members of his district office staff visited Pamlico Community College Wednesday to meet with PCC President Dr. Jim Ross and other college leaders, to observe one of PCC’s health care courses and to thank the college and its employees for their numerous national recognitions for excellence and positive contributions to the community.

Ross said, “It was an honor for PCC that Congressman Murphy selected our college to come to visit. I enjoyed getting to know him and members of his team. He impressed me as a thoughtful, independent leader, and I look forward to working with him in the future to improve opportunities for the residents of Pamlico County and the region.”

Murphy lauded Ross for his remarkable leadership that has brought great accomplishments for Pamlico County citizens. Murphy said he found it extraordinary that on-campus surveys have found 95 percent of PCC employees reported high morale. In contrast, national surveys show approximately 30 percent of workers across America in all fields have high morale.

The congressman also praised PCC leaders for their empathy and support for students, saying a single positive interaction can affect a student’s outlook and prospects for success.

Murphy, a physician, is serving his second full term in the U.S. House of Representatives. The Greenville Republican first was elected to the Third District U.S. House seat in 2019 to serve out the term of the late Walter B. Jones Jr., who had died in office. Murphy was re-elected to the seat in 2020 and in 2022.

After arriving at the college Wednesday, Murphy and his staffers were briefed about the college and its recent honors and accomplishments by Ross. The congressman’s group, which also included two members of the Pamlico County Board of Commissioners and Pamlico County Manager Tim Buck, then walked to the Delamar Center to visit with students in a Nurse Aide I course.

Nurse Aide I is one of the most popular short-term Continuing Education health care programs offered by PCC. Many, including Dialysis Technician, Physical Therapy Technician and Medical Billing and Coding, have been added in recent years. There are plans to expand the number of health care and other hands-on program offerings in the future, Ross explained to the congressman.

Following the classroom visit, Murphy was ushered to the Delamar Center Conference Room, where more than a dozen members of the PCC President’s Cabinet introduced themselves and offered their thoughts about working with students.

After leaving the conference room, Murphy, Ross and others stopped in the Delamar Center Auditorium, where the president explained why he made the decision five years ago to waive rental fees for Pamlico County non-profit organizations to better serve the community and the dramatic impact it has had on the community. It has also resulted in a huge increase in the community’s use of the facility.

Ross expressed appreciation to the “wonderful community” for fully embracing PCC with great partnerships. He also praised the Pamlico County commissioners for their outstanding support and partnership, and he thanked Buck and Commissioners Kari Forrest and Ed Riggs Jr. for accompanying Murphy to PCC Wednesday.

 


NCWorks Staffers Now Visit Twice Monthly

VP Jamie Gibbs, Cristy Warner and NCWorks staffer

February 13, 2023

Pamlico Community College and the Craven NCWorks Career Center are expanding their partnership, which is great news for anyone looking for a new job and any employer searching for new staffers.

Beginning this month, staffers from the NCWorks New Bern office will be in the Johnson Building at PCC’s Grantsboro campus every first and third Tuesday each month from 10 a.m. to 2 p.m. to meet with job-seekers and to assist potential employers.

Working in collaboration with PCC’s Cristy Lewis Warner, NCWorks can assist Pamlico County men and women in searching for jobs, improving their skills or developing career plans.

No appointment is required. Services are free and open to the public.

“We are proud of our partnership with the Craven NCWorks Career Center, which itself is a collaboration between the N.C. Department of Commerce, the Eastern Carolina Workforce Development Board and many regional service and educational partners,” said PCC President Dr. Jim Ross. “Having their staffers on campus will enhance our ability to match residents with new jobs and training opportunities, which will result in an improved quality of life for everyone.”

Warner, who is director of the PCC Career Resource Center, said the Craven NCWorks Career Center is a tremendous resource to have on campus each month.

“Having Craven NCWorks on campus will provide Pamlico County residents with assistance in connecting with our regional employment opportunities and information about training opportunities,” she said.

One of those opportunities for job-seekers is the Workforce Innovation & Opportunity Act (WIOA) Adult program, which assists adults who may need training to enter the current labor market.

“Additionally, employers can also connect with the center to list jobs, locate potential employees and learn about their many employer services,” Warner added.

For more information about the services available at the college, contact Warner at 252-249-1851, ext. 3014, or cwarner@pamlicocc.edu. The Craven NCWorks Career Center in New Bern can be reached by calling 252-514-4828 or by visiting www.ncworks.gov.

 


29 Students Named to Fall President’s List

Gayle Hardy

February 2, 2023

Pamlico Community College has announced the names of the students who have earned placement on the PCC President’s List for the Fall 2022 semester.

To be eligible for the list, a student must be enrolled full time throughout the semester and must earn a grade point average between 3.5 and 4.0.

“It is an honor to salute these hard-working and dedicated men and women who have achieved great success in their respective academic programs,” said PCC President Dr. Jim Ross. “We are proud of these high-achieving students and look forward to celebrating their next successes.”

The 29 students named to the Fall 2022 President’s List are:

* Hannah Altman of Grantsboro (Cosmetology)

* Cindy Barker of New Bern (Associate in Arts)

* Terria Barrett of Vanceboro (Cosmetology)

* Savannah Barton of Bayboro (Welding)

* Angela Bateman of Cary (Associate in Arts/Partnership Teach program)

* Taylor Bateman of Cary (Criminal Justice)

* Ashley Bowers of New Bern (Associate in Science)

* Julissa Figueroa-Beltran of Grantsboro (Associate in Science)

* Angel Gaylord of Aurora (Environmental Science Technology)

* Faith Gayring of Sebastian, Fla. (Associate in Arts)

* Gwendolyn Hart of Alliance (Criminal Justice)

* Maria Herrera of Raleigh (Associate in Science)

* Ayden Hill of New Bern (Welding)

* Madison Hughes of Jacksonville (Dental Laboratory Technology)

* Kyle Jacobs of New Bern (Associate in Science)

* Megan Jones of Bayboro (Associate in Science)

* Alexandra McMillin of Newport (Business Administration)

* Rochelle Meadows of Aurora (Early Childhood Education)

* Alexandria Midgette of New Bern (Business Administration)

* Allison Midyette of Grantsboro (Cosmetology)

* Kelsey Price of Aurora (Medical Assisting)

* Ashley Ray of New Bern (Dental Laboratory Technology)

* Presley Robinson of Grantsboro (Cosmetology)

* Anajah Rouse of Bayboro (Cosmetology)

* Ayesha Salim of New Bern (Accounting & Finance)

* Lauren Schmidt of Bayboro (Medical Assisting)

* Mary Simpson of Grantsboro (Associate in Science)

* Joshua Tillman of Oriental (Business Administration)

* Thelma Wynn of New Bern (Accounting & Finance)

The following student has earned placement on Pamlico Community College’s Academic Distinction List for the Fall 2022 semester. To be eligible, a student must be enrolled full-time throughout the semester and earn a grade point average between 3.0 and 3.49.

* Stephany Carvallo of Aurora (Early Childhood Birth to Kindergarten Associate Degree)

 


Former Educator Joins PCC Board of Trustees

Gayle Hardy

January 25, 2023

A former Craven County Teacher of the Year who spent nearly four decades working in public education is the newest member of the Pamlico Community College Board of Trustees.

Gayle Hardy, a Pamlico County resident who retired in 2021 after working 38 years as a classroom teacher and in other roles for school systems in Craven County, Pamlico County and Norfolk, Va., has been appointed to the board by Gov. Roy Cooper to serve out the unexpired term of Dr. Sue Lee.

She was scheduled to attend her first board meeting Jan. 24.

“I’m excited to be part of the conversation again,” said Hardy, who most recently worked as the Advancement Via Individual Determination (AVID) program coordinator and AVID elective instructor at New Bern High School – a role for which she earned the title of Teacher of the Year in 2020.

Bob Lyon, chairman of the college’s Board of Trustees, said he is pleased to have Hardy join the board.

“I welcome her to the Board of Trustees,” he said. “I look forward to working with her to make the college better.”

PCC President Dr. Jim Ross said he expects Hardy to be an excellent member of the PCC Board of Trustees.

“She impressed me greatly with her more than 30 years of experience in helping students reach their potential to succeed in the classroom,” he said. “Her record of changing students’ lives for the better is extraordinary, and this entire region is better because of her impact on students’ lives. The governor made an excellent decision in appointing her.”

Hardy has deep roots in the region. She grew up in the Broad Creek area of Craven County with family members on both sides of the Craven-Pamlico county line.

“We crossed over that line two or three times a day growing up,” Hardy said with a chuckle.

A shy girl, Hardy said she was initially unenthusiastic about school, but came to love it after good years with great teachers at Bridgeton Elementary School and elsewhere. Hardy graduated from New Bern High School and went on to earn a bachelor’s degree in elementary education from East Carolina University in 1984 and a master’s degree in education from ECU in 1986.

She taught at Fred A. Anderson Elementary School in Bayboro for two years before taking a job as a teacher and grant coordinator in Norfolk, Va. After six formative and rewarding years there, Hardy returned to Eastern North Carolina and worked as a classroom teacher at elementary schools in Craven County before taking a job as a reading specialist at New Bern High School. Her final position was as AVID coordinator/instructor at NBHS, where she worked to prepare underserved students for success in college or careers.

“My goal was to open up as many opportunities as possible and for them to be successful,” she said.

Hardy is married to John Hardy, a man with Wayne County roots she met during her time in Virginia. They live in Olympia and have two grown daughters.

The PCC Board of Trustees is made up of 12 members. Four members are appointed by the Governor’s Office, four are appointed by the Pamlico County Board of Commissioners and four are appointed by the Pamlico County Board of Education.

 


CCP Registration Set for Jan. 24 and 25 in Bayboro

CCP students outside of the Ernestine R. Mattocks Bldg.

January 17, 2023

High school juniors and seniors who are interested in enrolling in tuition-free Pamlico Community College courses can sign up for those classes next Tuesday and Wednesday, Jan. 24 and 25, from 8 a.m. to 3 p.m. each day at the Mattocks Center in Bayboro.

The credits earned by passing these college-level N.C. Career & College Promise (CCP) courses can help students get ahead on either a college degree or an in-demand hands-on career.

Importantly, they help students, and their families save lots of money.

“Tuition-free CCP courses are the among the best things we offer. In fact, I believe there is no better bargain in American higher education today than the tuition-free college-level courses we offer to high school juniors and seniors,” said PCC President Dr. Jim Ross. “The CCP program is a wonderful way for motivated students who want to get ahead in their studies or who want to get started on their careers to do so.”

The CCP program is open to local students, regardless of whether they attend Pamlico County High School, Arapahoe Charter School, Pamlico Christian Academy or a home school.

The courses are taught in a face-to-face format, an online format or in a combination of both. Many of the courses are offered at the Ernestine R. Mattocks Center of Excellence, which is located behind PCC’s Bayboro Center and across the street from Pamlico County High School.

Others are offered on the PCC campus in Grantsboro or online.

At PCC, CCP students earn an average of 39 free college credit hours while still in high school. That’s a lot of money saved in college or university tuition and fees!

Students and their families are encouraged to talk to their high school guidance counselors or to contact PCC’s Derek Godwin at dgodwin@pamlicocc.edu or 252-249-1851, ext. 3106, for more information.

 


Lana Green Receives PCC President’s Award

Dr. Ross and Lana Green

January 9, 2023

Lana Green says you never know who’s watching and appreciating your work and your attitude.

Never has that been truer for the full-time custodian and New Bern native than when Pamlico Community College President Dr. Jim Ross named her the recipient of the 2022-23 President’s Award.

The award, which Ross created after he became the college’s fifth president in 2016, is presented annually to a PCC employee who is considered by Ross to be a great example of being professional and productive on the job and who has a positive attitude.

Green’s selection was announced during the college’s Christmas luncheon in December. Ross formally presented her the award Monday on campus.

“Lana Green exemplifies the key attributes of professionalism, productivity and positivity,” Ross said. “She is an outstanding professional and an outstanding person.”

For her part, Green was surprised to receive the award. She was visibly moved upon hearing her name at the December luncheon and, a month later, is still surprised the president had taken note of her efforts on the job.

“I was just shocked. I had no clue,” Green said recently. “In my position, a lot of time you don’t get recognized. Never in a million years did I think Dr. Ross would choose me.”

Green has been employed at PCC since 2016. Her duties include cleaning rooms and entranceways and ensuring the restrooms are sanitary and stocked with supplies. She occasionally is the first person visitors encounter at the college, so she enjoys answering questions and giving directions.

“I help people who come to the college get to where they need to go,” Green said. “I love it. I’m a people person.”

Ross said he often takes note of Green’s ever-present smile and was impressed by her recent willingness to assist someone who was experiencing difficulty in the restroom.

“She makes lives better every single day at our college,” he said.

Green has worked at PCC since 2016. After working in home health care, she came to the college in search of a job with better hours and good benefits. Green still works a side job in home health care when she’s not at the college.

She said she likes her work at Pamlico and loves the family atmosphere on campus.

“I enjoy working here at Pamlico Community College,” Green said. “I try to do the best I can. I love it. There’s a work family here.”

Speaking of family, Green is the mother of two sons who live in the New Bern area. She also is close with her brother and two sisters, and she says she is happy that God has put her in a good place with a good job.

“I am thankful,” Green said. “I owe it all to God. I am highly blessed. I’m also thankful to Dr. Jim Ross for considering me.”

Previous recipients of the President’s Award include Herman Turnage, Pattie Leary, Cameron Kishel, Gary Toler and Meredith Beeman.

2022

Non-Profit Breakfast Will Return in 2023!

Dr. Ross and Mrs. Ross with Student

December 5, 2022

After concerns surrounding the COVID-19 pandemic forced a pause, Pamlico Community College President Dr. Jim Ross has announced the wildly popular annual PCC Non-Profit Breakfast will resume in May 2023.

“I believe the non-profit sector is the foundation of any great community, including Pamlico County,” said PCC President Dr. Jim Ross, who created the PCC Non-Profit Breakfast event in 2017. “Pamlico County is extremely fortunate to have outstanding non-profits that are led by fantastic people. It will be our honor to welcome these organizations back to campus and to salute them for their service to others.”

PCC has established a record of exceptional support for the community in numerous other ways, as well. One of the actions most appreciated in the community came just prior to initiating the PCC Non-Profit Breakfast celebration in 2017.

In late 2016, after several months of getting input and looking into how to allow the Delamar Center to be better utilized by the community, Ross took the bold and unprecedented action of providing free usage of the Delamar Center for all Pamlico County non-profit organizations.

This was a permanent directive. The response since has been dramatic with more than a 300 percent increase in use of the Delamar Center annually by the community. Organizations serving our community in every way have benefitted.

“We treasure community suggestions on how we can partner to make lives better,” Ross said. “For example, the Delamar Center action came after I met with Senator and Linda Sanderson shortly after I became President. Linda told me the college was charging several hundred dollars for local groups which they couldn’t afford to use the Delamar Center and asked if I could look into if there was a way the community could have it more affordable to use. We looked into it and found the best community-minded approach was to eliminate the costs for all Pamlico County non-profit organizations to use our Delamar Center, so we did so. It was the most fair thing to do so we did it. The response has been amazing, and our community has been made even better because of it.”

He continued, “It is an honor to serve such a wonderful community, and we wish to do everything we possibly can to help it become even better.”

Local non-profit organizations should expect to receive invitations to the 2023 PCC Non-Profit Breakfast celebration in March, PCC officials said. The event will be held Tuesday, May 23, and will include a free breakfast for non-profit leaders paid for by local sponsors of the event.

Nearly 150 people representing about 50 local charitable groups and service organizations participated in the last event, which took place in May 2019. Much of that year’s event focused on the non-profit sector’s response to Hurricane Florence.

As in past years, the 2023 Non-Profit Breakfast will feature the aforementioned catered morning meal for participants. Representatives of each non-profit group then will be invited to come forward to introduce themselves and to share a brief two-minute summary of their work.

“We are very excited about bringing back this event so we can thank these wonderful organizations for their efforts to improve people’s lives in our community,” Ross said. “Our team here at the college will be reaching out to local organizations in the coming months, but we want to make sure the community is aware that the Non-profit Breakfast is back on for 2023! It is one more way we can say thank you for what our non-profit organizations do for our community. Their work is often life-changing and sometimes even life-saving.”


Registration Period Gets Underway at PCC

Cristy Warner, Counselor and Gretchen Steiger, Registrar

November 21, 2022

New and returning students can get a head start on the upcoming Spring 2023 semester at Pamlico Community College by enrolling now and registering for courses!

The registration period officially opened Nov. 14. PCC officials are encouraging returning students to go ahead and register for the new semester before the college’s winter break begins Dec. 19.

They also are encouraging new students to start the enrollment process early so they can explore the financial aid options that might be available, including scholarships and Workforce Innovation and Opportunity Act (WIOA) program funds.

PCC still will conduct its usual Spring Registration period on Jan. 4 and 5, 2023, but new and returning curriculum students can avoid the new year’s rush and get their face-to-face and online courses locked in now.

“We want to make registering for classes as convenient as possible for current students as well as for those who enroll with us in the new year,” said PCC President Dr. Jim Ross. “Now is a great time to get these processes started. By getting a jump on the new semester, both new and returning PCC students can ensure they get the classes they need so they can achieve their educational goals.”

PCC Vice President of Student Services Jamie D. Gibbs added, “We’re here to help. Please reach out and see how we can make enrolling at the college, securing financial aid and registering for courses here as easy as possible.”

Pamlico Community College is a place where students of all ages and backgrounds can succeed. WalletHub has ranked Pamlico as the No. 1 community college in the United States for students’ Educational Outcomes, and the college is pleased to offer its students a high-quality, nationally recognized education at an affordable cost.

The college features small class sizes so students can get more personalized attention. It also offers seated and online courses, including some programs that can be completed entirely on the web.

Importantly, financial aid is available for new and returning students who qualify. However, it’s important to begin the financial aid process early so students can have access to a range of options.

“Our early registration period helps men and women get a jump on starting the Spring 2023 semester,” Ross said. “Regardless of whether new and returning students contact our college now or wait until our formal registration period in January, all of us at PCC are here to help.”

New students are encouraged to contact PCC’s Student Services division to get the application and financial aid processes started. Staffers there can be reached at 252-249-1851, ext. 3001, or studentservices@pamlicocc.edu

Meanwhile, current students are encouraged to reach out to their program advisors.

Looking ahead, the registration period for high school juniors and seniors who want to take Career & College Promise courses through PCC is set for Jan. 24, 25 and 26, 2023, from 8 a.m. to 3 p.m. daily.

Seated classes will begin Jan. 11, 2023. Online courses start Jan. 26, 2023.


PCC Achieves Success During SACSCOC Visit

Dr. Ross and Graduate

October 31, 2022

A visiting team of distinguished academic professionals recently gave Pamlico Community College extraordinarily high marks for its overall operations, commitment to student success, compliance to regulations, and dedication to continuous improvement in serving students and its community.

The successful on-site review, conducted Oct. 17-20 by a nine-member team on behalf of the Southern Association of Colleges and Schools Commission on Colleges (SACSCOC), culminated months of intense preparation and self-examination of the college’s adherence to SACSCOC standards by PCC faculty members, staffers and administrators.

The exhaustive process ended with commendable success in every way. The on-site visit team made only one recommendation for improvement for PCC, which is a much better result than the norm among all colleges under SACSCOC jurisdiction for accreditation.

PCC officials accepted this recommendation in a positive, professional and prompt way as it satisfactorily completed addressing this one and only recommendation within 24 hours of the exit interview.

This near-perfect exceptional success effectively clears the way for an expected formal reaffirmation of accreditation for PCC for a 10-year period beginning in 2023.

Not surprisingly, PCC officials are ecstatic about the results.

“Our college has achieved outstanding success with our all-important SACSCOC reaffirmation on-site visit,” PCC President Dr. Jim Ross wrote in a note to all college employees announcing the results. “Thank you to all who worked so very hard the past several years to achieve this vitally important success!”

In recent years, PCC has won multiple national awards as one of America’s best community colleges. In each case, Ross has publicly praised PCC faculty and staff as the reason for these prestigious recognitions. Ross did the same for this SACSCOC success.

“The reason our college has received such a phenomenal SACSCOC visit success is because of our amazing faculty and staff who deeply care about making our students’ lives better. They are incredible,” the president said.

SACSCOC accreditation is extremely important for colleges and universities. It means degrees, diplomas and certificates awarded by the institutions are recognized for their value.

Additionally, students who attend non-accredited colleges and universities are not eligible for any federal financial aid, and the credits they earn at those colleges often do not transfer to accredited institutions.

Colleges and universities that do not perform well during the SACSCOC reaffirmation process can be subject to monitoring, probation or even the loss of accreditation.

“For these reasons and to make our college even better in service to our students, we have made SACSCOC reaffirmation a top priority throughout my presidency,” Ross wrote in his announcement.

“Thank you to each of you for your positive response to this priority.”

The president credited PCC employees’ extraordinary high morale, teamwork, and commitment to serving students with excellence as driving forces behind the highly successful SACSCOC review.

“At every step of this SACSCOC process during the past several years, our outstanding teamwork has brought outstanding success,” he said. “This objective and comprehensive examination by SACSCOC of our total college is further important evidence that we have an outstanding college that provides outstanding education to our students and service to our community.”

Ross continued, “The committee was highly complimentary of the extraordinary culture of caring and excellence we have established. They pointed out that our employees truly care and this is the basis for all we do and furthermore that our students know we truly care and this prompts them to seek success.”

The president singled out PCC Director of Institutional Effectiveness Dr. Rebecca Pesko for her work overseeing the SACSCOC reaffirmation process over the past five years.

“She has been consistent in seeking excellence from everyone at our college in every part of this process,” Ross said. “I am proud of her for the incredible work she has done.”

For her part, Pesko thanked college employees for their commitment to the process.

“We did it! Thank you to all those who were so willing to step in to assist with a successful on-site visit,” she wrote in a note to colleagues. “It was wonderful to be part of such a team effort. Without the involvement of so many, the visit would have not been the success it was.”

Ross also credited the college’s Executive Committee for its commitment to the reaffirmation process, and he saluted all PCC employees for their willingness to work hard to achieve this truly great result.

“The winners in this success are our students,” Ross concluded, “and that is the best reason for striving for this exceptional SACSCOC result for our college.”


Golfers Hit the Links at Foundation Tourney

Golf Team

October 17, 2022

Sixty golfers enjoyed a picture-perfect October Saturday last weekend as they hit the links to raise scholarship funds at the Pamlico Community College Foundation’s 22nd and ½ Annual CarolinaEast Cup Fundraising Golf Tournament at Minnesott Yacht, Golf & Country Club.

Saturday’s edition of the popular fundraiser took place about five months after the Foundation’s 22nd annual event. It marked the tourney’s move from a springtime event to an October one.

The tournament featured a field of 15 teams, with golfers from around Eastern North Carolina. Organizers divided the field into a First Flight, Second Flight and Mixed Flight, based on teams’ handicaps and abilities.

Teams that finished first or second in each flight were recognized, while the team with the lowest overall score was named Tournament Champion and winner of the CarolinaEast Cup.

Most importantly, the tournament raised thousands of dollars for student scholarships and other college priorities, although a final event tally is not yet available.

“The Foundation’s annual golf tournament is one of the highlights of the year for the college,” said PCC President Dr. Jim Ross. “When the Foundation decided to move the annual event from Spring to Fall, it also decided to have a second tourney this year so players would not have to wait from May 2022 to October 2023 for another tournament. We weren’t sure what the response would be, but as usual, our friends and neighbors in Pamlico County and beyond came through and made the 22nd and a half edition of the golf tournament a tremendous success.”

As usual, the tournament featured a superball format with a shotgun start. Competitors enjoyed a continental breakfast, a goody bag full of great giveaway items, a congregate lunch and a day of fun and laughs on the picturesque course.

There were $125 prizes for the players who hit closest to the hole on No. 5, 9, 12 and 14, as well as a prize for the player who hit closest to the curve on hole No. 8. A putting contest back at the clubhouse and a 50-50 raffle for half of the $440 pot helped round out the day.

“Is it not a perfect day? It’s a great day to be alive,” PCC Foundation Executive Director Michelle Noevere told the crowd shortly before the start of the lunchtime awards ceremony.

She later added, “Our tournament is becoming well-known in the area for its lineup of prizes, the fun on-course contests and the great giveaways, as well as the wonderful food and beautiful golf course provided by the Minnesott team.”

Noevere continued, “We wanted to move the tournament to an Autumn date, but we just couldn’t wait until 2023 to do it. All of us with the Foundation thank our golfers, sponsors and volunteers for their continued support of the tournament, which helps Pamlico Community College provide accessible and affordable postsecondary education, workforce training and other services to students.”

Each winning team member received beautiful, customized trophies and gift certificates to Minnesott Yacht, Golf and Country Club. This year’s winners included:

Tournament Champion team: Ricky Cotton, Eric Cunningham, Billy Flack and Allen Propst

First-place First Flight team: Jim Curry, Terry Knickerbocker, George Leslie and Gordy Phenes

Second-place First Flight team: Paul Anderson, Andy Franklin, David Gennantonio and David Toler

First-place Second Flight Team: John Angwin, Harvey Godwin, Rodney Myers and Greg Smith

Second-place Second Flight team: Allen Strobel, Blake Strobel, Ricky Strobel and Matthew Thurston

First-place Mixed Flight team: Sue Brown, Denver Locke, Cyril Smith and Danny Winfield

Second-place Mixed Flight team: Barbara Craven, Bill Craven, Gary Konyeshi and Matthew Revels

Putting Contest winner: David Toler

Closest to the Curve winner: James Townson

Closest to the Pin on No. 5: Harvey Godwin

Closest to the Pin on No. 9: Greg Smith

Closest to the Pin on No. 12: George Leslie

Closest to the Pin on No. 14: Greg Smith

50-50 Raffle Winner: Rodney Myers, who won $220

CarolinaEast Health System was the title sponsor and a Platinum sponsor of this year’s tournament. The PCC Small Business Center also was a Platinum sponsor.

Gold sponsors included: Gail Johnson; Jim and Michelle Krauss, Edward Jones/Dan Roberts IV, AAMS; The Pamlico News; Pamlico Quick Lube and Car Wash; and Superior Cranes.

Silver sponsors included: Garland F. Fulcher Seafood Company; Hardison Tire & Towing; Lori’s Golf Shoppe; NAPA Auto Parts – Pamlico Parts Company; and Robinson and Stith Insurance.

Putting green and prize sponsors included: Goose Creek Island Volunteer Fire Department; Jim and Leslie Kellenberger; and Truett Ray – Shade Tree Garage of Raleigh.


Veterans Group Endows New Scholarship Fund

Coastal North Carolina Veterans Foundation Members and PCC Representatives

September 26, 2022

A local veterans organization is using funds left over from an earlier service project to endow a new scholarship fund at Pamlico Community College so men and women can pursue their educational goals and improve their lives.

The Coastal North Carolina Veterans Foundation recently presented the Pamlico Community College Foundation with a $40,000 gift to create the William Henry Vogelsang Memorial Veteran’s Scholarship.

The Vogelsang endowment, which honors an Eastern North Carolina man who was wounded in action, will create an annual scholarship for a curriculum student and will be used to support Continuing Education students taking short-term career courses.

Priority for the Vogelsang scholarships will be given to Purple Heart recipients and their children or grandchildren. Second in line will be American service veterans, followed by any eligible student. The organization is setting no restrictions on a student’s program of study.

PCC President Dr. Jim Ross enthusiastically welcomed the endowment gift, calling it “a wonderful way for these honored veterans to support the academic dreams of students and their families.”

He continued, “I enjoyed visiting with Mr. David Seaton and learning about the background of their wonderful foundation and its noble purpose. We share the belief that the sacrifices of our veterans must never be forgotten and must always be honored as essential to the freedoms that we enjoy as a nation. Our college is deeply appreciative of this amazing gift of an endowed scholarship to our PCC Foundation and we are humbled to think of the many lives that will be made better throughout perpetuity because of it.”

For her part, PCC Foundation Executive Director Michelle Noevere said the generous gift would help the college and the Foundation build on their ongoing efforts to serve veterans.

“We are deeply appreciative of the Coastal North Carolina Veterans Foundation for this endowment to honor those who have served this country,” she said. “It enhances the list of education financial assistance we can make available to our veterans or their dependents. PCC is a Silver Level Military Friendly School, demonstrating our commitment and pride in giving veterans and their dependents a helping hand in achieving their educational goals and dreams. We also have a VA school certifying official on staff ready to assist.”

Pamlico is one of three community colleges to receive an endowment from the group. Both Carteret Community College and Craven Community College received similar gifts. The three colleges serve the same geographic area of the veterans’ organization.

David Seaton, finance officer for the Coastal North Carolina Veterans Foundation, said funds for the college endowments came from monies initially donated to the Military Order of the Purple Heart and other groups to send Wounded Warriors home for Christmas or New Year’s Day.

That program, named the “Military Order of the Purple Heart Home Leave Program”, was launched in response to the desire of injured Marines at Camp Lejeune’s Wounded Warriors barracks to be able to travel home for the holidays.

Over the years, the Home Leave Program funded holiday trips for 400 to 450 Wounded Warriors each year, Seaton said. Fundraisers, donations and gifts from service organizations, particularly the Knights of Columbus, helped build the program’s monies, he said.

But as the wars in Afghanistan and Iraq wound down, the number of Wounded Warriors decreased, Seaton said. In recent years, no service members have qualified for the program.

With circumstances changed, the organization decided to use the leftover funds for another great cause – scholarships at local community colleges.

“We had some money left, so we wanted to find an avenue where we could put it to good use,” Seaton said.

Noevere said the Foundation hopes to grow the Vogelsang endowment and its other funds so more students can be helped.

“With the end of the calendar year approaching – a time of year when many of us think of giving to causes that are meaningful to us and helping those in need – please consider donating to the William Henry Vogelsang Memorial Veteran’s Scholarship fund or the Dr. Robert Ross Memorial Veteran’s Scholarship fund,” she said. “Go to www.pamlicocc.edu/about-foundation.php to donate online, or make your check out to ‘Pamlico Community College Foundation’ and include a note with your preferred scholarship designation.”

Checks can be mailed to the PCC Foundation, P.O. Box 185, Grantsboro, N.C. 28529.

The first William Henry Vogelsang Memorial Veteran’s Scholarship awards likely will be given out during the 2023-24 academic year.

For more information about this scholarship and all of PCC’s financial assistance programs for curriculum students, please contact PCC Financial Aid Director/VA School Certifying Official Meredith Beeman at 252-249-1851, ext. 3026, or mbeeman@pamlicocc.edu.


Environmental Courses Set PCC Apart in ENC

Environmental Instructor, Zac Schnell with students

September 6, 2022

If you’re interested in protecting our region’s unique environment, consider Pamlico Community College’s Environmental Science Technology and Environmental Management Technology programs.

The two Environmental programs are the only community college programs of their kind in Eastern North Carolina. They offer two-year associate degrees that appeal to men and women who enjoy the outdoors and who want to work in careers that help keep our natural surroundings clean, safe and enjoyable.

The programs are designed to give students the knowledge they need to help protect soil, water and air quality. Not only can they lead to good jobs, they can be stepping stones to a four-year degree in environmental studies. They also offer a number of valuable, career-enhancing certifications.

“We are extraordinarily proud of our Environmental Science Technology and Environmental Management Technology programs, and we are very fortunate to have a fabulous instructor like Zac Schnell in place to lead them,” said PCC President Dr. Jim Ross. “He is an enthusiastic and knowledgeable instructor who works hard to share his expertise and love for nature with his students. As I’ve said in the past, Environmental Science Technology and Environmental Management Technology are two of the programs that set Pamlico Community College apart from its peers. We are happy to offer these important programs and to have an innovative, well-liked instructor to lead them.”

For his part, Schnell said, “It’s great to hear from alumni and see how their careers in the field have been progressing over the years, and I look forward to continue to assist students!”

Schnell grew up in coastal North Carolina and earned his bachelor’s and master’s degrees from N.C. State University. He spent two years in the Peace Corps, working on coastal management projects in the Philippines.

The contacts he developed in the Philippines were critical to his effort to organize the successful 2018 Study Abroad trip there for PCC students.

Schnell also worked for a while at the Great Smoky Mountains National Park Institute at Tremont before joining the PCC faculty in 2016.

At PCC, Schnell and his students can often be found outdoors, collecting water and soil samples and examining the effects of pollution.

The programs feature a mix of hands-on learning and classroom instruction. They also can be completed online. In fact, motivated students can complete the Environmental Science Technology associate degree in one year by using a combination of intense half-semester courses.

Kobe Wright, a Pamlico County High School graduate, is wrapping up his studies at PCC this semester. A lifelong fan of science, particularly volcanoes, Wright has discovered a passion for protecting and enhancing water quality. He recently began work at a water department in a neighboring county.

While at PCC, Wright has been able to secure his OSHA 30 safety certification by taking one of the safety courses taught by Schnell. He praised Schnell’s passion for the college and his dedication to staying engaged with his students.

“For anyone who is looking to get better engagement as far as their education goes, I highly recommend enrolling at Pamlico Community College,” Wright said, adding he is considering pursuing a four-year environmental degree at the University of North Carolina at Wilmington (UNCW).

“Pamlico County and coastal North Carolina are beautiful places,” Ross said. “All of us at Pamlico Community College are proud to offer programs to train men and women to understand, protect and enhance this wonderful environment.”

For more information about PCC’s Environmental programs, contact Zac Schnell at zschnell@pamlicocc.edu or call 252-249-1851, ext. 3115.


Continuing Education Plans Busy September

Continuing Education Student with Medication Cart

August 29, 2022

While the registration period for seated and online full-term curriculum courses at Pamlico Community College has passed, there are plenty of other opportunities available this semester to enhance your job skills and explore new careers.

The college plans to launch about a dozen short-term Continuing Education courses in health care, agriculture, information technology and other workplace skills.

These courses are open to adult learners. Financial aid is available for qualified students.

“Our college over the past several years has made it a priority to create dozens of new vocational programs for our community to train residents for careers that are in-demand by regional employers and pay well,” said PCC President Dr. Jim Ross. “I thank our employees who have risen to this ambitious challenge to establish these new programs to serve our community even better. We will continue this as a priority with determination in the years to come. One of our top priorities is to establish dozens more programs in the foreseeable future for our community. Our Continuing Education division is off to a strong start this semester, and there’s more to come in September and in the years to come. We have a wonderful lineup of programs scheduled for men and women who are interested in high-demand career fields or who want to become more valuable in their current jobs. The programs vary from hands-on courses to others than can be completed online.”

For her part, PCC’s Chair of Continuing Education and Technical Programs Lori Giles said, “Our lineup of health care courses is strong and growing, and we’ve added new classes in Dental Coding and Billing and Sustainable Agriculture. We’re ready to help area residents develop the skills they need for the workplace.”

September’s schedule will include:

* Sustainable Agriculture, an evening seated course that will begin Sept. 6. It will meet from 5 to 8

p.m. through Dec. 1. Cost is $180.

* Effective Teacher Training, an online course that’s scheduled to start Sept. 12 and end in October.

Cost is $125.

* Medication Aide, a daytime seated course starting Sept. 13. It will meet from 9:30 a.m. to 4 p.m.

Tuesdays and Thursdays through Sept. 22. Cost is $70.

* Natural Hair Care, a seated course that will begin Sept. 14 at the college’s Cosmetology Building in

Bayboro. It will meet Mondays thru Thursdays from 9 a.m. to 3 p.m. Cost is $180.

* Dental Billing and Coding, which is a two-part, web-based program starting Sept. 16. Each part

costs $180.

* Nurse Aide II, a daytime seated course starting Sept. 20. It will meet from 8:30 a.m. to 4 p.m.

Tuesdays and Thursdays through Dec. 13. Cost is $180.

* Pharmacy Technician, an evening seated course scheduled to start Sept. 20. It will meet from 5 to

8:30 p.m. Tuesdays and Thursdays through May 9. Cost is $180.

* Phlebotomy Technician, a daytime seated class starting Sept. 20. It will meet from 8:30 a.m. to 4

p.m. Tuesdays and Thursdays through Feb. 17, 2023. Cost is $180.

* Notary, a one-day class scheduled for Sept. 24 in Bayboro. It will meet from 8:30 a.m. to 5 p.m. Cost

is $70, plus a book.

* ServSafe, a one-day seated training that’s set for Sept. 26. It will meet from 9 a.m. to 7 p.m. Cost is

$70.

* Cold Weather Vegetable Gardening, a series of seated workshops beginning Sept. 27. The

workshops will meet from 5 to 8 p.m. Tuesdays through Nov. 1. Cost is $70.

* Electrical Wiring, an evening course scheduled to start Sept. 27. It will meet from 5:30 to 8:30 p.m.

Tuesdays and Thursdays. Cost is $180.

More great courses are set for October.

For more information about these programs or to register, contact the college at 252-249-1851, ext. 3015, or lgiles@pamlicocc.edu.


CCP Registration Set for Aug. 29, 30, 31

Christy Novajosky, left, and Sarah Henries

Pictured are Christy Novajosky, left, and Sarah Henries

August 22, 2022

Area high school juniors and seniors can get a tuition-free head start on a college degree or a great hands-on career by taking N.C. Career & College Promise (CCP) program courses through Pamlico Community College!

Registration for these courses is set for Monday, Tuesday and Wednesday, Aug. 29, 30 and 31, at the college’s Mattocks Center in Bayboro, which is located next door to Pamlico County High School. Hours will be 8 a.m. to 3 p.m.

The courses are open to high school juniors and seniors who attend PCHS, Arapahoe Charter School, Pamlico Christian Academy or a home school.

“I don’t think there is a better deal in American higher education today than the Career & College Promise program available in North Carolina,” said Pamlico Community College President Dr. Jim Ross. “The program offers local high school juniors and seniors an opportunity to accumulate college-level credits tuition-free, which can save students and their families thousands of dollars. The program is ideal for students who want to get a head start on a college degree or a great hands-on career.”

The credits that high schoolers earn by passing the tuition-free courses at PCC can be applied to an Associate in Arts degree or an Associate in Science degree. The approved credits transfer to all public colleges and universities in North Carolina, and to many of the state’s private colleges and universities as well.

Additionally, CCP students can choose to explore hands-on career courses such as Welding and Cosmetology while in high school, which can give them a head start on a great profession.

The CCP program has been great for motivated students.

For example, high-achieving PCHS student Sarah Henries graduated with both an Associate of Arts degree from PCC and her high school diploma from PCHS earlier this year. She is now enrolled at East Carolina University.

The CCP program also helped Christy Novajosky compile dozens of transferable credits while in high school at Arapahoe Charter School.

After graduating from Arapahoe in 2021, she enrolled at PCC to continue her education, compiling a remarkable 68 transferable college credits and earning her Associate in Arts degree, which she received earlier this Spring. Now a full-time student at Appalachian State University, Novajosky is on track to earn her Bachelor’s degree in Business Administration from ASU in May 2023 – a full two years early.

The CCP program also can lead to the early launch of a great hands-on career. PCHS graduate Cecilia Holton, Class of 2020, began her Cosmetology studies as a high school junior and graduated with her Cosmetology diploma from PCC in July 2020.

Because Holton took PCC courses through the CCP program while in high school, she did not have to pay college tuition and was able to begin her full-time, professional career as a teenager.

“CCP courses represent a fantastic opportunity for area juniors and seniors,” Ross said. “Participating students will receive a high quality, versatile education without having to pay tuition. I urge students and their parents to consider this option.”

For more information about Career & College Promise courses, talk to your high school guidance counselor or contact Derek Godwin, PCC’s director of the CCP program, at dgodwin@pamlicocc.edu  or 252-249-1851, ext. 3106.


SGA President Finds Encouragement at PCC

PCC President, Dr. Ross and SGA President, Stephanie Brown

August 8, 2022

Pamlico Community College’s commitment to serving students and treating them well is part of what impresses Stephanie Brown about the college.

She says her experiences at PCC have easily bested her time at other community colleges.

“I’ve never experienced a school like this,” the 28-year-old Vanceboro woman said. “I love the smallness of it. You get to know a lot of people.”

She initially was attracted to enroll at the college by its No. 1 ranking by WalletHub as America’s top community college for students’ educational outcomes. At Pamlico, Brown found a family atmosphere with friendly, supportive instructors and staffers.

“I saw about the No. 1 ranking and thought, ‘Something must be really good about this school,’” she said. “The instructors are so nice. I feel like they actually want you to succeed.”

Brown said she also has been impressed with the efficient manner staffers take care of her financial aid and course concerns, and she praised college employees for their professionalism.

Brown singled out PCC President Dr. Jim Ross for creating a culture of student support and kindness.

“Dr. Ross has really helped me,” she said. “He’s like a mentor to me. It’s great to have a president who really cares.”

Brown has thrived at Pamlico. She is Student Government Association president and is on track to earn an associate degree in Early Childhood Education later this year. She hopes to pursue a four-year degree and a master’s degree, with the goal of finding a career in social work.

In addition to her studies, Brown stays busy raising the three children she shares with her husband, Brandon. She formerly worked as a teacher’s aide and a bus monitor in Craven County.

“Stephanie Brown symbolizes the best of our outstanding student body as she truly cares about making the world better,” Ross said. “She is an outstanding student and also very importantly is a very loving and dedicated parent.”

The president continued, “Pamlico Community College offers a nationally recognized education, but we also offer a welcoming environment for students such as Stephanie Brown. We invite men and women to check out what we have to offer for the Fall 2022 semester and join us.”


PCC Electrical Program Powers New Careers

Instructor Larry Monk

July 28, 2022

Pamlico Community College’s Electrical Systems Technology program can empower you for a great career!

The program trains students to install and maintain electrical and electronics systems found in homes, businesses and industrial sites.

Coursework, most of which is hands-on, includes topics such as AC/DC theory, basic wiring practices, programmable logic controllers, industrial motor controls, applications of the National Electric Code and other subjects.

Students can earn an Associate of Applied Science degree, and there are certificate options available.

“Electricity truly powers our world, and our Electrical Systems Technology program is a great pathway into this important career field,” said PCC President Dr. Jim Ross. “Our program includes informative classroom instruction as well as hands-on training.”

Larry Monk, a 2012 graduate of the program, is the lead instructor. He began work at the college in 2018 after working at Hatteras/Cabo Yachts in New Bern, where he installed electrical equipment on high-end boats.

He has said he enjoys sharing his knowledge and skills with students and showing them the opportunities available in the field.

There is a quite a bit of math in the program, but the hands-on learning makes it an attractive option to potential students, Monk has said.

The lab where he teaches is inside the recently renovated and expanded Johnson Building, and it includes several new pieces of sophisticated equipment.

For more information about PCC’s Electrical Systems Technology program, contact Monk at lmonk@pamlicocc.edu or 252-249-1851, ext. 3029.

Registration for the upcoming Fall 2022 semester is scheduled for Aug. 9 and 10 at the college. For more information about signing up for courses, contact Student Services at 252-249-1851, ext. 3001, or studentservices@pamlicocc.edu.


PCC’s Early Childhood Program Prepares Pros

Early Childhood Students in Classroom

July 11, 2022

Parents and family members are a child’s first teachers, but not far behind are professional child care workers, who are among the most important role models and guides in many preschool children’s lives.

Pamlico Community College’s Early Childhood Education program can prepare people to work as highly trained child care workers and teachers in a number of educational settings, including day care centers, preschools, public and private schools and other learning environments.

“As the pandemic wanes and more people return to the workplace, the need for child care professionals is growing,” said PCC President Dr. Jim Ross. “The college’s Early Childhood Education program offers convenient curriculum options for students who are interested in entering and advancing in this critical field.”

The college’s program prepares individuals to work with children from birth through age 8 in diverse learning environments. Students combine learned theories with practice in actual settings with young children under the supervision of qualified teachers.

Early Childhood Education program graduates learn to plan and implement developmentally appropriate programs, and they get to explore their creative side with arts and crafts projects and other activities.

PCC’s program offers two Associate of Applied Science degree tracks, including the Early Childhood Associate Career Track and the Birth-Kindergarten Transfer Track.

The Career Track is for individuals who wish to earn an Early Childhood Education degree and enter the childcare workforce. The Birth-Kindergarten Transfer Track is designed for individuals who wish to transfer to a UNC system institution and elsewhere to earn a four-year degree in Birth-Kindergarten Education.

Two shorter term Diploma options and multiple Certificates in Early Childhood Education also are available.

Instructor Neil Callahan leads the college’s Early Childhood Education program. He plans to use a hybrid method of delivering instruction in two of his courses for the upcoming Fall 2022 semester, which begins in August.

“Two courses will be offered as an online hybrid utilizing Zoom software,” he said. “Students will be able to attend these courses ‘live via streaming’ from the comfort of their own homes. With gas prices as they are, I can see this option being a popular choice for students who wish to still have that ‘in-the-classroom’ feel.”

Entirely online course options also will be available.

Registration for the Fall 2022 semester is scheduled for Aug. 9 and 10, but new and returning students are encouraged to contact the college now so they can be prepared to register.

For more information about the college’s Early Childhood Education program, call Instructor Neil Callahan 252-249-1851, ext. 3042, or 252-229-9710. He also be contacted via email at ncallahan@pamlicocc.edu.


Legislator Honored as Extraordinary Partner

Dr. Jim Ross and Bobby Hanig

June 23, 2022

Pamlico Community College recognized the tireless work and continued support of one of its strongest legislative advocates recently by presenting him with the college’s 2022 Extraordinary Partnership Award.

Rep. Bobby Hanig, who currently represents the college and all of Pamlico County in the N.C. House of Representatives, was presented this prestigious award in his Raleigh office by PCC President Dr. Jim Ross.

Hanig, who also serves as Deputy Majority Whip in the chamber, has been particularly instrumental in the college’s efforts to grow and strengthen its widely-praised education programs for offenders at Pamlico Correctional Institution in Bayboro.

“Rep. Hanig is an outstanding public servant who has been an extraordinary champion for our college,” Ross said. “We have asked him to help lead vital initiatives to advance our college, and in every single case he has pursued these with tireless energy, determination, and integrity until victory is achieved. He is responsible for monumental achievements for our college and those we serve.”

Hanig is only the fourth person or organization to be recognized by Pamlico Community College with its Extraordinary Partnership Award. He joins mental health organization Promise Place, former PCI Superintendent Faye Daniels and N.C. Sen. Norman Sanderson as recipients of the award. Sanderson has received the honor twice – in 2017 and 2019.

Ross said it was important to recognize Hanig’s outstanding work on behalf of the college’s prison education programs, which have received statewide praise as an exceptional model in reducing crime and recidivism by preparing offenders to be law-abiding, productive, good citizens after their release.

The award states, “Representative Hanig has provided exceptional overall support for Pamlico Community College, which has enabled our college to gain national recognition as one of America’s best community colleges. He has also provided extraordinary support of our prison education program’s goal to become America’s best prison education program, which will bring reduced crime, reduced recidivism, and enormous benefits to all North Carolina citizens.”


Award Recipient Stays Ahead in Her Studies

Christy Novajosky

June 6, 2022

When it comes to her education, Christy Novajosky is all business.

The 19-year-old Bridgeton woman earned four dozen hours of transferable college credit by taking tuition-free college-level courses from Pamlico Community College while she was still a high school student at Arapahoe Charter School.

After graduating in 2021, she enrolled at PCC to continue her education, compiling a remarkable 68 transferable college credits and earning her Associate in Arts degree, which she received earlier this Spring.

Now a full-time student at Appalachian State University, Novajosky plans to take courses in both Summer terms at the Boone university, even as she works as an intern at First Citizens Bank in New Bern.

Through all of these efforts, Novajosky is scheduled to earn her Bachelor’s degree in Business Administration (BSBA) from ASU in May 2023 – a full two years early. She also was named PCC’s Academic Excellence Award recipient and the college’s Student of the Year for 2022 earlier this year.

“Without this (N.C. Career & College Promise) program, I would be on my first year at Appalachian State University as a freshman, instead of transferring in this Spring 2022 semester as a Junior with 68 credits,” Novajosky wrote recently. “This opportunity has saved me several thousand dollars and has set me ahead of others my age. The money and time saved will help me complete my Bachelor’s degree sooner and begin my journey into the workforce.”

PCC President Dr. Jim Ross said Novajosky’s experience shows what the N.C. Career & College Promise program and a strong work ethic can do for students.

“Christy Novajosky shows the type of opportunities available for motivated students at Pamlico Community College,” he said. “She has worked extremely hard, maximizing her time in high school and at PCC. It was an honor for us to recognize all of her successes – her awards and her degree – at graduation.”

During the May 13 Commencement ceremony, Vice President of Student Services Jamie Gibbs presented Novajosky with a plaque and a medallion for her award. As the recipient of the Academic Excellence Award, she becomes Pamlico’s 2022 honoree in the N.C. Community College System’s “Great within the 58” list of high-achieving students.

In nominating Novajosky for the Academic Excellence Award, Instructor Dr. Rebecca Pesko wrote, “This year’s recipient was a leader in engaging in class discussions and was always proactive and very thorough in all assignments they submitted.”

Novajosky said she has been interested in the business world for a long time. She hopes to focus on finance, with the goal of becoming a financial analyst or advisor. Her lifelong strength in math has also been a help, she said.

Novajosky praised the N.C. Career & College Promise program and the opportunity to enroll in PCC courses while still in high school.

“Taking those courses at Pamlico cut out two years that I would have had to do at Appalachian,” she said in a telephone interview. “I would definitely advise other students to do it. Go ahead and knock it out.”

For more information about how high school juniors and seniors can take college-level courses tuition-free through PCC, please contact Derek Godwin at 252-249-1851, ext. 3106, or dgodwin@pamlicocc.edu.


College Hosts Joyous 2022 Commencement

Grads and Guests in Delamar Auditorium

May 16, 2022

Dozens of smiling graduates walked across the stage inside Pamlico Community College’s Delamar Center auditorium Friday evening to receive the associate degrees, diplomas, certificates, and Continuing Education credentials they had earned this academic year.

The joyous, hour-long ceremony marked the first indoor Commencement at the college since 2019. Because of concerns and restrictions surrounding the COVID-19 pandemic, both the 2020 and 2021 graduations had been drive-thru events.

“Tonight is a night for celebration,” said PCC President Dr. Jim Ross, presiding over his sixth Commencement as the college’s president. “We’ve waited a long time for this – to get back to some sense of normalcy. It is great to be having a graduation inside again, so we’re going to have a great time celebrating tonight.”

He and other speakers saluted the graduates for their perseverance and drive to overcome challenges during the pandemic. Ross also recognized the family members and friends who supported the graduates and cheered them on throughout their college careers, and he acknowledged the college’s faculty and staff for their work to keep serving students during the pandemic.

Thirty-seven men and women participated in Friday’s ceremony, and about 350 family members, friends and others sat in the audience to cheer them on.

In all, 54 curriculum students completed their studies this academic year, earning a combined 28 associate degrees, nine diplomas, and 62 academic certificates. Additionally, 63 students completed short-term Continuing Education programs this year and were eligible to take part in the ceremony.

This year’s youngest graduate was 17. The oldest curriculum graduate was 59, while the oldest Continuing Education completer was 66.

Family members of the late Larry Prescott, a longtime PCC employee and trustee, were recognized during the event. Prescott, who had been associated with the college since its founding, died in April. College and civic leaders who attended the ceremony also were recognized.

Inspired by a quote by baseball great Yogi Berra, Commencement speaker Doug Brinson, a longtime community leader who now serves as chairman of the Pamlico County Board of Commissioners, told the graduates they would come to “forks in the road” throughout their lives and that they should be prepared to make decisions about them.

He went on to say graduates should not avoid responsibility and be accountable for their decisions when they encounter these situations. They had already come to one such fork in the road by deciding to enroll at the college and complete their educational goals, Brinson said.

“Every one of you that are graduating here tonight have had to face this fork in the road about decisions about what you’re going to be doing,” he said. “Once you’ve made your decision to graduate and come through this, you’re accountable for it and you’re doing it. To that, I applaud you. I wish each of you well. I feel confident that every one of you who is on this path will succeed.”

PCC also presented its most prestigious annual awards during the ceremony.

The first honoree was Christy N. Novajosky, who received the 2022 Academic Excellence Award and also was named the college’s Student of the Year. Novajosky, who graduated at the event with her Associate in Arts degree, began her college career while in high school through the Career & College Promise program. She was able to compile a staggering 68 transferable college credits.

Vice President of Student Services Jamie Gibbs presented Novajosky with a plaque and a medallion. As the recipient of the Academic Excellence Award, she becomes Pamlico’s 2022 honoree in the N.C. Community College System’s “Great within the 58” list of high-achieving students.

PCC Criminal Justice Instructor Derek Godwin received the college’s Instructor of the Year Award. He also serves as director of the Career & College Promise program for high schoolers and as director of the Bayboro Center.

The Adjunct Instructor of the Year award went to David Swickline, who teaches psychology. He attended the ceremony with his wife and infant twin sons.

Vice President of Instructional Services Michelle Willis Krauss presented both instructor awards.

Chair of Continuing Education and Technical Programs Lori Giles accepted the Staff Member of the Year Award, which is voted on by college employees. She was recognized for her efforts to grow the college’s Continuing Education program, including the launch of several new short-term health care offerings.

Vice President of Financial Services Sherry Raby presented Giles with the award.

The college’s Alumnus of the Year Award went to Francisco Arreol-Muro, a 2019 PCC graduate who earned associate degrees in Environmental Science Technology and Environmental Management Technology. He now conducts inspections and reviews at Eastern North Carolina community colleges for the Environmental Health and Safety Institute, which is based at Blue Ridge Community College in Henderson County.

PCC Foundation President John Barlow II presented the award.

Ross presented the President’s Award to PCC Director of Financial Aid Meredith Beeman. He said Beeman exemplifies the attributes of positivity, professionalism and productivity in her daily efforts to help students navigate the complex guidelines of financial aid.

A reception with refreshments took place in the Delamar Center’s atrium. In the nearby Conference Room, graduates and their families had an opportunity to have a free family portrait taken.

PCC faculty and staff members took photos of each graduate receiving their diplomas and soon will e-mail these free of charge to all graduates. The faculty and staff members also videotaped the ceremony and will e-mail the link to this commencement video free of charge to the graduates.


Record Participation Highlights Tournament

Golfer swinging club

May 9, 2022

Around 80 golfers took advantage of an unexpectedly beautiful day Saturday to hit the links and raise scholarship funds at the Pamlico Community College Foundation’s 22nd Annual CarolinaEast Cup Fundraising Golf Tournament at Minnesott Yacht, Golf & Country Club.

This year’s tournament featured a return to a traditional format, with a shotgun start, no masks and a congregate lunch.

Generous sponsors provided plenty of prizes for the competitors, who also enjoyed a continental breakfast, a goody bag full of great giveaway items and a day of fun and laughs on the picturesque course.

The tourney featured a maxed-out field of 21 teams, with golfers from around Eastern North Carolina. The large field of participants led tourney organizers to divide the four-member teams into a First Flight, Second Flight and Third Flight, based on team members’ handicaps and abilities.

Teams that finished first or second in each flight were recognized, while the team with the lowest overall score was named Tournament Champion and winner of the CarolinaEast Cup.

Most importantly, the tournament raised more than $11,000 for student scholarships and other college priorities.

“Saturday was simply a fantastic day for our college and our community,” said PCC President Dr. Jim Ross, who delivered brief opening remarks as the tourney got underway. “The tremendous turnout of golfers and volunteers again showed the extremely generous spirit of Pamlico County and the area. Our students are the direct beneficiaries of that spirit of giving, and we thank everyone for their support.”

Ross continued, “We couldn’t have asked for a better day or a better event. I commend Foundation Executive Director Michelle Noevere and her team for organizing this year’s tourney. It was a tremendous success.”

This year’s tournament featured $125 cash prizes for golfers who hit closest to the pin on holes 5, 9, 12 and 14, prizes for the man and woman who hit closest to the curve on hole No. 8, and a putting contest back at the clubhouse.

A new feature this year allowed players to choose to pay a $5 fee to have the golf pro Karl Thurber hit their first shot on hole No. 9.

A 50-50 raffle for half of a $665 pot and a silent auction of donated “themed” baskets, golf packages and other items rounded out the day. The themed baskets were donated by the personnel of various Pamlico Community College departments, and area golf courses donated the Rounds for Four packages.

“This year was a record-setter for team participation for this event,” Noevere said. “Our tournament is becoming well-known for the generous prize packages, the fun course contests and the giveaways, as well as the delicious food and beautiful golf course provided by Minnesott Yacht, Golf and Country Club. The owners and staff of the country club, our volunteers, sponsors and donors deserve a standing ovation. It is their hard work and expertise that make this event a successful fundraiser to support the mission of Pamlico Community College to provide accessible and affordable postsecondary education, workforce training and other services to the communities served by the college.”

This year’s winners included:

 

Tournament Champion team: John Hopkins, Taylor Lyon, Mark Sullivan and Leo Van Buuren

First-place First Flight team: Billy Holton, Mitch Kominiarek, Ron Pontiff and James Walker

Second-place First Flight team: Scott King, Randy McGruther, Dan Sanchez and Ted Tyndall

First-place Second Flight Team: Jack Bishop, Micki Campbell, Tommy Campbell and James Snyder

Second-place Second Flight team: Jeff Cannon, Georgia Dawson, Jack Kilpatrick and Patrick Woods

First-place Third Flight team: Will Harper, Jim Krauss, Phillip Nanney and Matt Scott

Second-place Third Flight team: Michele Bessette, Bryce Detwiler, Steve Russ and Jim Strihan

Putting Contest winner: Leo Van Buuren

Closest to the Curve winners: Michele Bessette and John Roy

Closest to the Pin on No. 5: Micki Campbell

Closest to the Pin on No. 9: Micki Campbell

Closest to the Pin on No. 12: Sue Thatch

Closest to the Pin on No. 14: Jeff Cannon

50-50 Raffle Winner: Kyle Sherman

CarolinaEast Health System was the title sponsor of this year’s tournament. Platinum sponsors were the PCC Small Business Center and Andy Vestal of Truist Investment Services Inc. Vestal also sponsored the “Closest of the Pin” prizes.

Gold sponsors included: Michelle and Jim Krauss, Bojangles/Tands; Goose Creek Island Volunteer Fire Department, Edward Jones/Dan Roberts IV, AAMS; The Pamlico News; Pamlico Quick Lube and Car Wash; Superior Cranes; Systel Business Equipment; and Ward & Smith, P.A.

Silver sponsors included: Henry and Mary Ann Hale; Hardison Tire & Towing; Lori’s Golf Shoppe; Sam Myers and Mary Helen Boone; and Garland F. Fulcher Seafood Company.

Robinson and Stith Insurance and Pamlico Packing Co., Inc. sponsored the putting green, while prize sponsors included Myra Blue and Herbie Blue Family in memory of Herbie Blue; Forrest Farm Supply; Vickie Moseley Jones; Iris Hudson; Bob Lyon; Village Hardware; Scott Frazer and Debbie Harrison.


Commencement Set for Friday at Delamar Ctr.

Graduates Lining Up

May 9, 2022

Returning to a traditional, pre-COVID format, Pamlico Community College will host its 2022 Commencement Exercises on Friday, May 13, beginning at 6:30 p.m. in the auditorium at the Ned Everett Delamar Center on the college’s Grantsboro campus.

The college will formally recognize men and women who have completed the coursework required to earn associate’s degrees, diplomas and certificates, as well as those who have completed short-term Continuing Education career programs.

The event, which comes in the wake of drive-thru Commencement ceremonies in both 2020 and 2021, will include a traditional walk across the stage by each graduate as well as a post-ceremony reception. Additionally, a photographer will be on hand to take free family photos of each graduate and his or her family after the ceremony.

PCC President Dr. Jim Ross will preside over his sixth Commencement as the college’s president. Douglas “Doug” Brinson, chairman of the Pamlico County Board of Commissioners, will deliver the Commencement address.

“Commencement is always the most joyous day of the year, and this year’s event promises to be no different,” Ross said. “The return to a traditional indoor ceremony for the first time since 2019 is very special, and all of us are excited to commend these graduates for their hard work during some of the most challenging circumstances imaginable. These students and their families have persevered to accomplish their goals. It’s a great time to celebrate.”

Brinson is a familiar face in Pamlico County. He is a native of the county and a graduate of Pamlico County High School.

 

After earning a bachelor’s degree from Atlantic Christian College in 1970, he worked as a high school teacher in Raleigh. Brinson later became an agent with the North Carolina State Bureau of Investigation, where he served in postings in Raleigh, Greenville and Elizabeth City.

After retiring from law enforcement, he returned to Pamlico County to take over the family farm operation in Arapahoe. Brinson also became an active community leader.

He has served multiple terms on the Board of Commissioners. Brinson also is a former member of the Pamlico County Board of Education and the Pamlico County Board of Elections.

“Doug Brinson has dedicated many years of exemplary service to Pamlico County, which is his home,” Ross said. “He is an outstanding friend of Pamlico Community College. We are honored that he has accepted our invitation to speak at Commencement and look forward to hearing the wisdom he imparts to our graduates and guests.”

During Friday’s ceremony, the college’s Academic Excellence Award/Student of the Year winner will be announced. The college also will honor its Instructor of the Year, Adjunct Instructor of the Year, Staff Person of the Year and Alumnus of the Year.

In addition, Ross will present the President’s Award to a college employee.

Pianist Paula Murray will provide the processional and recessional music.

Masks will not be required at the ceremony but will be available for anyone who wishes to wear one.

Tickets are not required.


Dialysis Tech Program Making Lives Better

Dialysis Students Working on Patient

March 15, 2022

Less than a year after its launch, Pamlico Community College’s new Dialysis Technician program is considered an early success as it is already making lives better and building momentum for a strong future.

The short-term training program, which teaches men and women to operate the hemodialysis machine (a piece of lifesaving equipment used to filter dialysis patients’ blood) has had great success inside and outside the classroom.

Two students who completed the program now are already working in area dialysis clinics, and two more are currently going through the application process for jobs in the field.

The program recently enrolled its third class of students, and will offer additional classes later this year.

“When we began this program, we knew it had the potential to make an immediate impact on our students and on our community for our region’s citizens who rely on dialysis,” said PCC President Dr. Jim Ross. “We had to financially invest very heavily in it to have elite state-of-the art equipment needed for our students to get the best possible training at PCC, but it was well worth it. This is important for the students when they enter their careers and it is important to area residents undergoing dialysis to receive the best possible medical service. We are confident that students who complete this program will be well-qualified to secure good jobs that help improve their lives and help them improve the lives of dialysis patients and their families.”

Ross has led an ambitious initiative the past five years that has resulted in numerous new programs for students who wish to work with their hands in good-paying and in-demand vocational/technical/medical careers. His equally ambitious goal going forward is to secure funding to begin 28 additional new vocational/technical/medical training programs identified by a task force he founded as beneficial for our county and region.

The Dialysis Technician program, which began in August 2021, is part of the college’s ongoing commitment to offer more short-term training programs that respond to industry needs and that can lead to good jobs in all sectors, including in the area’s growing health care sector.

Kacynthia Ingram, a New Bern nurse originally from Ohio, leads the Dialysis Technician program. Her students learn the theoretical, technical and clinical skills needed to maintain dialysis equipment and to provide care to patients being treated for chronic renal diseases.

Classes generally include lecture and hands-on lab activities with the college’s new, state-of-the-art dialysis machinery.

“It gives them the chance to get their hands on the equipment,” Ingram said.

An important part of the program is learning to deal with patients in a kind, compassionate and empathetic manner, she said. Patients undergoing dialysis can visit clinics up to three times per week for three- to four-hour-long appointments, so it’s important for technicians to learn the skills necessary to make clients feel at ease.

“They’ll often call a tech before they call a nurse,” Ingram said, expanding on the important role technicians play in health care settings.

The demand for dialysis technicians is expected to remain strong. The federal Bureau of Labor Statistics predicts an 11 percent increase in medical and clinical laboratory technician occupations such as dialysis technicians between 2020 and 2030.

So far, only women have completed the college’s program, but it can be a great option for men as well.

Cost to enroll in the PCC’s Dialysis Technician program of study is $180. Scholarships are available for students who qualify.

“Pamlico Community College is committed to equipping students with the skills they need to secure good jobs in health care and a variety of other fields,” Ross said. “We strongly believe our vastly expanding short-term programs for those who like to work with their hands will make a positive difference for them and our overall community.”

For more information or to register for the Dialysis Technician course of study, please contact Lori Giles, PCC’s chair of Continuing Education and Technical Programs, at 252-249-1851, ext. 3015, or lgiles@pamlicocc.edu.


PCC’s Dental Lab Tech Program Unique in ENC

Dental Lab Tech Students Working with Dentures

March 7, 2022

Pamlico Community College’s Dental Laboratory Technology program can make you smile!

Launched in 2017, the program trains students to design and build the dentures, bridges, crowns and orthodontic appliances dental patients need for their teeth to work and look their best.

Students in the program participate in online instruction as well as in hands-on lab work.

Men and women who complete the program can earn a two-year associate’s degree. Diploma and certificate options also are available.

“When we began this program, we knew it would lead to wonderful opportunities for students to have great careers in this important field,” said PCC President Dr. Jim Ross. “Students in this program not only learn the skills they need to improve their lives, they become positioned to improve the lives of people who need dental care throughout the region. That’s very gratifying.”

PCC’s Dental Laboratory Technology program is unique in the area. In fact, Pamlico is the only N.C. community college east of Durham currently offering it.

The program is led by Dr. Saleh “Sal” Jany, an Iraqi-born professional who has worked at the college since December 2018. Now living in New Bern and working on a postgraduate degree in Public Health at George Washington University, Jany brings nearly 30 years of dental experience to his post as instructor.

He said PCC’s program prepares students to be important members of the dental care team.

“The dental laboratory technician is a skilled professional working with dentists to improve teeth’s health, appearance and function,” he said. “Technicians manufacture appliances that are common in dental treatments. They are part of the team that brings back beautiful smiles to people.”

The Dental Laboratory Technology program soon will be headquartered in the renovated Johnson Building at the Grantsboro campus. In the interim, the program’s instruction is primarily web-based, with weekly hands-on lab sessions in the Bayboro Center.

PCC also offers its Dental Laboratory Technology students to offenders housed at Pamlico Correctional Center in Bayboro. Jany also is the instructor there.

“Our Dental Laboratory Technology program is part of our college’s commitment to ensuring men and women have the education and training they need to earn a good living,” Ross said. “Vice President of Instruction Michelle Willis played a critical role in making this program possible for our community. In one of the first meetings I had with her after I became PCC President in 2016, she proposed plans to add this program on campus and showed how this could provide good jobs for Pamlico County citizens who like to work with their hands. I soon agreed, and we began a one-year planning and implementation process that led to it becoming a reality on campus for our community.”

For more information about PCC’s Dental Laboratory Technology program, contact Dr. Saleh “Sal” Jany at 252-249-1851, ext. 3065, or sjany@pamlicocc.edu.


Online B-Term Courses Begin March 10 at PCC

Student working on laptop

February 16, 2022

Pamlico Community College again will offer a slate of half-semester curriculum courses that are designed to help students get caught up on the current semester or get ahead in their studies.

These classes, known as “B-Term courses,” will be offered online. They will feature the same amount of academic material as a full-term class, but in a half-semester timeframe.

PCC’s Spring 2022 B-Term courses are a great way for motivated students to catch up if they missed this semester’s start date or to move ahead in their programs.

These classes also are available for students who are enrolled in other colleges or universities and have been unable to get into a required course at their home institutions.

“B-Term courses are a great way for students to achieve their academic goals,” said PCC President Dr. Jim Ross. “These classes can be challenging, but they are real time-savers for motivated students. I encourage men and women to check out these courses to see if they fit their needs.”

Registration for these classes is underway. The courses will begin March 10 and will end May 9.

The course offerings will include:

* ACA 111 – College Student Success

* ACA 122 – College Student Success

* CIS 110 – Introduction to Computers and its corresponding lab

* COM 231 – Public Speaking

* EDU 119 – Intro. To Early Childhood Education

* ENG 111 – Writing and Inquiry

* ENV 232 – Site Assessment and Remediation

* ENV 250 – Rural Watershed Protection

* HIS 132 – American History II

Students who enroll at PCC can expect to receive a nationally recognized education, regardless of the path they choose.

WalletHub has ranked Pamlico as the No. 1 community college in the United States for students’ Education Outcomes, and SmartAsset has ranked PCC the No. 2 community college in America. In addition, the college recently was ranked North Carolina’s No. 1 community college by BestValueSchools.org.

For more information about B-Term courses, current students are encouraged to contact their advisors. New students are encouraged to contact Student Services at 252-249-1851, ext. 3001, or studentservices@pamlicocc.edu.


High Morale Leads to Great Success in 2021!

Dr. Ross with graduate

February 10, 2022

Pamlico Community College in 2021 had a year to remember as it brought acclaim to our state by being ranked among the best community colleges in the United States again and again.

As 2021 ends, Pamlico continues to be ranked number 1 among all community colleges in America for student success. This number 1 ranking for student success came from the national analysis by WalletHub of several hundred colleges in all states, using data from the U.S. Department of Education. In addition to that ranking, Pamlico in 2021 also earned prestigious national ranking as the number 2 overall community college in America. This ranking came from the national analysis of hundreds of community colleges from all states by SmartAsset, using data from the U.S. Department of Education and other federal sources.

Also in 2021, Pamlico Community College was rated the No. 1 community college for excellence in North Carolina. This ranking came from Best Value Schools on its list of Best Community Colleges in North Carolina.

Pamlico Community College President Dr. Jim Ross gives enthusiastic credit to “the outstanding faculty and staff for their extraordinary dedication to serving students with excellence.” That has led, he said, to dramatic increases in PCC graduation/transfer rates and other areas. PCC’s graduation/transfer rates have dramatically increased by 20 points during the past three years. At 76%, it is now two times higher than the national average.

Ross believes a shared vision of the employees to make lives better through their work and the skyrocketing morale of employees in recent years have been keys to the dramatic improvement in performance and rankings. While nationwide surveys of employees show overall morale at all organizations in the United States falling and now at a dismal 30%, PCC is a shining exception. The annual Institutional Effectiveness Office employee survey in 2021 found that a remarkable 95 percent of PCC faculty members and staffers report high morale.

“Having 95% of our faculty and staff report they have high morale – especially during the pandemic – is astonishing,” said Ross. He said there has been a steady incline in high morale in recent years, increasing dramatically from 55% of employees several years ago to 95% in the most recent survey in 2021. “I strongly believe these incredible morale increases provide the foundation for the college gaining these incredible improvements and awards during the past few years.”

When Ross became President nearly six years ago, he asked faculty and staff to strive to make lives better with their work every day and he asked each employee to have the goal to make the college “the best organization of any kind in our nation – whether it be education, business, government, or non-profit organizations – in how we treat other people. This included how we treated students; fellow employees; people we see in the community; and those in our own families.” Ross said if the college employees did this, it would bring such satisfaction to our faculty and staff and such goodwill to the college that everything we do will get better as a result. He asked supervisors to lead the way by treating all employees with dignity, respect, and appreciation while developing a joyful culture that is positive, professional, and productive.

It is working beyond all expectations. When SmartAsset ranked Pamlico the No. 2 community college in the United States for 2021, it was based on U.S. Department of Education data from 820 community colleges across America on student graduation/transfer rates, student-instructor ratio, and affordability. PCC received outstanding scores for its graduation/transfer rate of its students of 76 percent, its student-instructor ratio of 9-to-1; and its exceptionally low cost and affordability for in-state students, according to SmartAsset. Notably, PCC’s 76 percent graduation/transfer rate is double the national average. The highest score earned on SmartAsset’s 2021 rankings was 100, with PCC close behind and earning a score of 99.97.

When PCC earned additional prestigious national recognition by WalletHub as America’s No. 1 community college in student success, the top ranking was based on an evaluation of federal data on student educational outcomes including first-year retention rate; graduation rate; transfer-out rate; degree and certificates awarded per 100 full-time-equivalent students; student-faculty ratio; share of full-time faculty; and presence of special learning opportunities such as dual enrollment or distance education programs.

Also in 2021, Pamlico was rated No. 1 by Best Value Schools on its list of Best Community Colleges in North Carolina. A year earlier, PCC had been named North Carolina’s best online community college for 2020 by Affordable Colleges Online (AC Online).

There are numerous additional highlights of 2021. Among these are developing numerous vocational/technical continuing education programs to prepare local citizens for good-paying and in-demand careers working with their hands. There have been nearly 30 such programs added at PCC in recent years. This past fall, the college successfully launched several new short-term training programs. For example, the college began offering a short-term Dialysis Technician program, enrolling an initial class and with two other sections of Dialysis Training added for the current semester. This will help the region to meet a glaring shortage of trained professionals.

In addition, the college plans to significantly expand its training programs for the public safety community to meet their growing training needs. As part of this, PCC has met this past year with community leaders in law enforcement, firefighting, and emergency medical services to ask how training can be improved through new technological advancements. As a result, the college in 2021 committed to and has taken necessary steps to purchase state-of-the-art simulator systems that local leaders recommended and believe will dramatically improve the capability for training public safety professionals to make our community even safer.

Also in 2021, a new building was opened at the college’s Bayboro site. The Ernestine R. Mattocks Center of Excellence expands the capacity of the college to serve more high school students, expand the number of classes, and provide enhanced quality. The new Mattocks Center serves high school juniors and seniors who are taking tuition-free PCC courses through North Carolina’s Career & College Promise program. The building dedication in December was a stirring event with more than 100 community attendees who honored Reverend Mattocks, a highly-revered community icon and former PCC Board Member who passed away two years ago.

The new year brought with it more opportunities to host face-to-face courses for students. Not only did PCC employees adapt to the ever-changing nature of working during a pandemic, they thrived. They also reported feeling valued and appreciated at work. According to the college’s 2020-21 PCC Faculty & Staff Satisfaction Survey, 95 percent of responding employees expressed high morale and said they were treated as “valued members” of the college team – the highest figure ever.

Ross said he believes treating people well is the right thing to do for all employers.

“When employees have high morale, this brings increased quality of work,” he said. “Our dedicated and caring employees are to be commended for embracing such a positive and uplifting team spirit despite the coronavirus pandemic. The fruits of this high-morale team spirit are many and have proven incredibly important in enabling our college to serve our students and community with excellence and change lives for the better.”

2021

PCC Mattocks Center Dedicated in Bayboro

December 6, 2021

More than 100 people came together Saturday morning to dedicate Pamlico Community College’s new Ernestine R. Mattocks Center of Excellence in Bayboro and to remember the life, legacy and spirit of love of its very popular namesake.

 

The day was unusually warm, and the remembrances of Mattocks were even warmer as family members, college officials, community leaders and friends shared their recollections of a person who everyone agreed could bring all kinds of people together.

 

“Her life was based on sharing love with all she met and truly caring about everyone she met,” said PCC President Dr. Jim Ross, who had recommended that the college’s Board of Trustees name the new, roughly 2,300-square-foot building after Mattocks. “I just don’t think I’ve ever met anyone who is more remarkable.”

 

Speaker after speaker recounted Mattocks’s smiling face, generous demeanor and unwavering love for people. The mood at the event was joyous, occasionally even taking on the spirit of a celebratory church meeting.

 

Mattocks died in January 2020 at age 73. In addition to serving seven years on the college’s Board of Trustees, she was an ordained minister and served as the longtime director of the Pamlico County Board of Elections.

 

Mattocks was a beloved community leader and someone who had a reputation for kindness, a positive personality and a genuine desire to help others. She had been orphaned at age 2 and had grown up poor before achieving success and earning prominence in Pamlico County, family members said.

 

True to the spirit of its namesake, the Ernestine R. Mattocks Center of Excellence rose from initial misfortune. A previous college building at this site, which was a converted, 1970s-era single-family home used by PCC’s Career Center and Small Business Center, was damaged beyond repair by Hurricane Florence in 2018.

 

After the hurricane, PCC and other community colleges worked in partnership with the N.C. Community Colleges System Office and the State Board of Community Colleges to ask for a special appropriation from the General Assembly to repair or replace devastated buildings, among other hurricane-related relief requests.

 

The General Assembly – notably Sen. Norman Sanderson of Pamlico County, who was present Saturday – and the governor delivered, with the result being the new Mattocks Center. It features two technology-equipped classrooms, two offices and restroom facilities. It is used primarily by students from Pamlico County High School, Arapahoe Charter School, Pamlico Christian Academy and home schools who are taking tuition-free PCC credit classes. In the evening, it is used for Continuing Education and Small Business Center classes for Pamlico County adults.

 

“She will be cheering them on,” said PCC Trustee Vickie Moseley-Jones, who called Mattocks a mentor and a community icon who embodied a spirit of excellence. She also had a reassuring smile that simply was unforgettable.

 

“It was the smile for me,” Moseley-Jones said. “When she smiled at you, you knew everything was going to be all right.”

 

Pamlico County Board of Education Chairman John Prescott called Mattocks “the epitome and definition of authentic” who knew the importance of being true to your roots.

 

“She knew what was best, and it was for the kids,” he said.

 

Pamlico County Board of Commissioners Chairman Doug Brinson recalled the sense of fairness that Mattocks displayed during her service at Board of Elections director, saying, “She took that job very serious.”

 

Later in the event, the Rev. Virginia Mattocks, daughter of the late Ernestine Mattocks, approached the podium for her remarks singing a song about life’s work. She then thanked the college and the community on the family’s behalf.

 

“We say thank you for loving my mama,” Virginia Mattocks said, adding that her mother’s spirit of sharing and love could transform anyone she met into family.

 

She also said she hoped students who use the Mattocks Center will “study hard, stay committed to the vision and keep the faith.”

 

High school students Faith Gayring, Noah Johnson and Antonio King were on hand to give tours of the building and to answer guests’ questions

 

Later in the ceremony, family members and Ross unveiled a portrait of Mattocks by artist Kane Bess that will hang in the new building’s entrance hall.

 

“The beautiful spirit of Ernestine Mattocks lives on,” Ross said to conclude the event. “Let all of us be reminded of her spirit every day and spread love and caring to all we meet and help bring healing and unity to our nation.”

 


New Recruiter Eager to Raise Awareness

 

November 22, 2021

Kalie Styron loved her time as a community college student.

 

Now, as Pamlico Community College’s new recruiting and retention specialist, she wants to bring even greater awareness of PCC’s many offerings to the community and to show potential students how the college can help them reach their educational goals and improve their lives.

 

“I am such a huge fan of community colleges,” the energetic Arapahoe woman said. 

 

In her new role, Styron will work to build relationships with local schools, students, parents and faculty members. She also will engage with community organizations and civic groups to promote PCC and its wide range of program offerings. In addition, she will work with current PCC students to help them succeed. 

 

“There are some incredible programs here,” Styron said. “I’m looking forward to getting started.”

 

PCC President Dr. Jim Ross said he was excited to have her in the important role of a recruiter and retention specialist at PCC.

 

“Kalie Styron will make our community better by reaching out to residents throughout our county and letting them know how our programs can help them have a bright future. She will make a huge difference,” he said. “She lives in the community and she interacts extremely well with people. Her enthusiasm and passion for our mission is contagious. She is a great fit.”

 

PCC Vice President of Student Services Jamie Gibbs, who will be Styron’s supervisor, agreed, saying, “We are very excited to have her aboard the Student Services team. She is a welcome addition, and I anticipate her doing a great job.”

 

Styron grew up in rural western Oklahoma in an area not unlike Pamlico County. She arrived in the county about 15 years ago.

 

Styron attended multiple community colleges, including Oklahoma City Community College in her native state as well as Durham Technical Community College and nearby Craven Community College in North Carolina.

 

She loved her time as a community college student so much in fact that an official at one of the colleges finally asked her about her goals, Styron recalled with a laugh.

 

“The relationships you have with the instructors make all the difference,” she said. “It’s the one-on-one attention you get at a community college that prepares you for the next steps. It’s a great segue way into a university.”

 

Styron eventually enrolled at East Carolina University, earning first a bachelor’s degree in communications and public relations and later a master’s degree in education.

 

She worked most recently as a teacher at W.J. Gurganus Elementary School in Havelock. Styron also has worked as a cheerleading coach, substitute teacher and bus driver at Arapahoe Charter School and a teacher’s assistant at Fred A. Anderson Elementary School.

 

In fact, a conversation with a former PCC president and a former Pamlico County Schools superintendent led her to continue her education, she said.

 

Styron hopes to persuade local residents to pursue their education as well, and she says Pamlico Community College is a great place to do it.

 

She wants to impress on young people that attending PCC after high school is not just a continuation of what they’ve done before.

 

“It’s a whole different environment within your own county,” Styron said. “It’s a great place. I really hope to inspire people to better their lives.”

 

For more information about the college, please contact Styron at 252-249-1851, ext. 3045, or kstyron@pamlicocc.edu.

 


PCC Ranked #1 in NC by Education Website

 

November 15, 2021

Pamlico Community College has received another prestigious honor to add to the growing list of state and national recognitions it has received in recent years.

 

BestValueSchools.org, a Utah-based education website, recently ranked PCC No. 1 on its list of Top 15 Best Community Colleges in North Carolina for 2021.

 

In its ranking, BestValueSchools.org noted the college’s recent state and national rankings for excellence.

 

“Pamlico Community College has been recognized as one of the top community colleges in North Carolina and the nation for many reasons,” the website states. “With small class sizes and high graduation and transfer rates, students of Pamlico succeed first in their studies and their careers.”

 

The website continued, “With academic programs, continuing education programs, and public safety and emergency management programs, Pamlico Community College offers a wide array of degrees and certifications to meet the needs of its diverse students. Students can either use their education at Pamlico to begin their career upon graduation or use it as a springboard to transfer to a larger university to pursue a bachelor’s degree.”

 

PCC President Dr. Jim Ross welcomed the BestValueSchools.org ranking, stating it demonstrates the college’s commitment to serving its community and helping residents improve their lives.

 

“As always, credit for this honor goes to the wonderful faculty and staff here at Pamlico Community College,” he said. “These extraordinary employees care deeply about making lives better. That is why we are enjoying such an incredible level of success that puts us at or near the top in national and state rankings.”

 

The BestValueSchools.org ranking comes shortly after an annual survey of college employees found a remarkable 95 percent of PCC faculty members and staffers expressing high morale. The significant rise in PCC employees’ morale has corresponded with the college’s recent spate of state and national awards.

 

In recent years, PCC has received a number of recognitions for excellence, most notably its recent rating by WalletHub as America’s No. 1 community college in Educational Outcomes for students.

 

The top ranking, which was announced in August 2020, was based on an evaluation of federal data on: first-year retention rate; graduation rate; transfer-out rate; degree and certificates awarded per 100 full-time-equivalent students; student-faculty ratio; share of full-time faculty; presence of special learning opportunities such as dual enrollment or distance education programs; and credit for life experiences.

 

Earlier this year, PCC was ranked No. 2 community college in the United States for 2021 by SmartAsset, a New York-based personal finance technology company. The ranking was based on U.S. Department of Education data on cost, graduation/transfer rates and student-instructor ratio.

 

In June 2020, the college was rated North Carolina’s best community college in providing online instruction by Affordable Colleges Online (AC Online).

 

“We are honored and humbled by these recognitions,” Ross said. “We take seriously our commitment to improving people’s lives through higher education.”

 

In its rankings, BestValueSchools.org noted the advantages of attending community college in North Carolina, including affordability, locations close to home and flexible program offerings. The organization also said the state’s community colleges offer programs specifically tailored to the workforce demands of their respective service areas, which can help graduates find good-paying jobs.

 

“It is a credit to North Carolina that community colleges in our state have a strong reputation for excellence,” Ross said. “I believe that North Carolina citizens receive an outstanding education at any community college in our state.”

 

The website’s rankings can be found here: https://www.bestvalueschools.org/community-colleges-in-north-carolina/.

 


Hungry Crowd Enjoys 11th Oyster Revival

 

November 15, 2021

A hungry, early-arriving crowd of around 170 people enjoyed 21 bushels of oysters, several crockpots of delicious chili and near-perfect autumn weather at the 11th Annual Great Oyster Revival & Chili Cookoff last Saturday at Pamlico Community College.

 

The popular PCC Foundation event, which took place in and around the college’s Delamar Center, raised around $3,000 for student scholarships and support.

 

In his remarks at the event, PCC President Dr. Jim Ross thanked the crowd for its generosity, saying the money raised would be used to support PCC students who plan to go on to four-year universities as well as those who are interested in hands-on skilled trades, health care and other career fields.

 

“Thank you for making this a great community college and a great community,” he said.

 

This year’s event featured some changes. For starters, it took place in November rather than the traditional fourth Saturday in February. Secondly, the event was held outside of the college’s Delamar Center rather than in the courtyard outside the Student Lounge at the Johnson Building.

 

Organizers say the date change was prompted by the COVID-19 pandemic last winter, which had taken hold in the United States in March not long after the 2020 Oyster Revival & Chili Cookoff in February. The location shift was necessary because of ongoing renovations to the Johnson Building.

 

As usual, oyster aficionados stood shoulder-to-shoulder at outdoor tables to shuck and eat all the oysters they could hold. The oysters came from local supplier Garland Fulcher Seafood. Nearby, a team stayed busy cooking the briny delights while local band Brant Island Strings provided the music.

 

Inside the Delamar Center, event participants sampled about a dozen pots of chili entered in the cookoff. Tables and chairs that had been spaced apart indoors gave participants places to sit and eat.

 

Some visitors brought their own chairs so they could sit outdoors, enjoy the music and visit with their neighbors.

 

Christina Moore won first place for her “Taste of Keystown Chili” while Tina Lynch took home second place for her “Kitchen Sink Chili”. Both women received customized trophies and prize packs including mugs and aprons.

 

Don Lane won the 50-50 raffle, taking home $290. Door prize winners included James Baluss and Kenan Lynch, who each won a PCC sweatshirt donated by Mary Kirk on behalf of the Goose Creek Island Volunteer Fire Department, and Cynthia Delamar, who won 5 pounds of shrimp.

 

“We are extremely pleased with how the event went this year,” said PCC Foundation Executive Director Michelle Noevere. “The oysters were salty, the chili was satisfying, the weather was beautiful and Brant Island Strings was phenomenal. Most importantly, the roughly $3,000 raised will help deserving students achieve their academic goals.”

 

She explained the roughly $3,000 raised was the equivalent of one semester of tuition and fees for two curriculum students, or it was the comparable amount of money needed to pay for the allied health course fee ($180) for 16 Continuing Education students.

 

Noevere thanked event sponsors Gail Johnson, Michelle and Jim Krauss, Dr. Sherri Hicks of Oriental Village Veterinary Hospital, Bojangles’, Tideland EMC, Blair and Becca Lang of Arlington Place, Axelson Chiropractic, Brantley’s Village Restaurant, Ray and Gail Cox of Cox Family Restaurant, Violet and Carl Ollison, Zimmerman Marine, and Jeff Styron of Garland Fulcher Seafood.

 

“Huge thanks also to our hardworking volunteers and our attendees,” Noevere said. “These fundraising events are not possible without you!”

For more information about the PCC Foundation, call 252-249-1851, ext. 3084.

 


Jobs Program Led to Career Success

 

November 10, 2021

Jamie D. Gibbs, Pamlico Community College (PCC) Vice President of Student Services, attributes much of his career success to the invaluable work experience he gained through a summer job training program while in high school. Through a federally funded job training program, he was able to participate in entry-level opportunities that provided him with the skills and knowledge he needed to get started down what would eventually become a very successful career.

 

“The program instilled in me the importance of work,” Gibbs said, adding that he learned what employers expect of him, practicing time management skills, developed a stronger sense of responsibility, and discovered the importance of a strong work ethic early on.

 

 While the programs may have changed over the years, what hasn’t changed is the positive impact these opportunities have on its participants and their potential careers. PCC currently offers services funded through the Workforce Innovation & Opportunity Act (WIOA) that provide great opportunities for students and job seekers to train for a new career and gain valuable work experience. PCC was awarded a WIOA grant through the Eastern Carolina Workforce Development Board, Inc., to assist eligible students with funding to pay for up to a two-year degree in a high-demand career. The results are simple: earn a credential, start your career, and earn a good wage.

 

Gibbs and PCC Career Center Director Cristy Lewis Warner encourage job seekers who are looking for employment to build on their foundation and consider going back to school to obtain a certificate, degree or diploma, while there is funding available to assist with tuition and related expenses. There are plenty of training options available in the region’s high growth career pathways, such as health care, advanced manufacturing, transportation, construction, skilled trades and aerospace/aviation.

 

At PCC, we are here to help potential students start their career pathway journey.

 

“From my early high school work experiences that I have held to the career in education that I chose, I have always had people in my life who believed in me. Garry Cooper, Laura Lancaster and Barbara Miller were worksite supervisors who instilled in me the values that I gladly now share with our students. I am proud to be a part of the PCC family knowing that working together we are changing lives.

 

Our WIOA program is designed to help our students achieve their educational and career goals. It’s a stepping stone to greater things,” Gibbs said.

 

PCC President Dr. Jim Ross agreed.

 

“I urge everyone in Pamlico County to learn more about the WIOA program,” he said. “Jamie Gibbs is a great role model for young people. He used the forerunner of WIOA to be an important step to his overall career success, and I urge everyone to look into the tremendous opportunities that exist today to help gain success for our local citizens. It is an honor for our college to enjoy an outstanding partnership with the Eastern Carolina Workforce Development Board and their dedicated professionals who serve this region.”

For more information about programs and services provided by WIOA, contact Cristy Lewis Warner at 252-249-1851, ext. 3014, or 252-777-2506. She also can be reached by email at cwarner@pamlicocc.edu.

 


PCC’s Medical Coding Program Offered Again

 

October 26, 2021

The next offering of PCC’s three-course Medical Coding Program online combo is scheduled to begin Monday, Nov. 15.

 

The program consists of three online component courses – Medical Terminology, Medical Billing and Medical Coding.

 

The final component course ends Sept. 30, 2022. Students who complete the three courses are eligible to take the CPC (Certified Professional Coder) exam.

 

Scholarships are available for qualified students.

 

For more information or to register, please call 252-249-1851, ext. 3015, or email lgiles@pamlicocc.edu.Back to Top

 


Enrollment Open for Next Dialysis Class

 

October 26, 2021

Pamlico’s next Dialysis Technician course is scheduled to begin Tuesday, Nov. 16. The course will meet Tuesdays and Thursdays from 8:30 a.m. to 4 p.m. through Feb. 3, 2022.

 

Scholarships are available for qualified students.

 

For more information or to register, contact PCC’s Continuing Education division at 252-249-1851, ext. 3015, or lgiles@pamlicocc.edu by email.

 


PCC is Participating in Application Week

 

October 18, 2021

Pamlico Community College is participating in a statewide effort this week to encourage high school students to go ahead and submit applications for college for the 2022-23 academic year.

 

The effort, named College Application Week, is organized by the College Foundation of North Carolina, or CFNC.

 

PCC’s participation is the latest way the college is stepping forward to help incoming students prepare for college and a better life.

 

“Applying to colleges and securing financial aid can be intimidating for first-time students and their families,” said PCC President Dr. Jim Ross. “That’s why all of us at Pamlico work hard to make these processes easier and to help individuals in every manner we can.”

 

Ross continued, “Not only are we participating in College Application Week this week, we will have a team from Student Services available in the college library this Saturday from 9 a.m. to noon to help students and their families complete the FAFSA form. Taking part in College Application Week and FAFSA Day are parts of our overall commitment to the community.”

 

During CFNC’s College Application Week, high school students have an opportunity to complete and submit online applications to state-supported colleges and universities at no charge or a reduced charge. Many private colleges and universities in North Carolina also participate.

 

There is no charge to apply at PCC. If you or someone you know is considering attending PCC beginning in the Fall 2022 semester, now is a great time to start the application process and to talk with PCC Student Services staffers about your options.

 

Interested men and women will need to know their personal identification information so they can accurately connect with external agencies, such as the Department of Education and CFNC. Potential students also should be prepared to include parental information, depending on age, marital status and if they have dependents.

 

Entering accurate information can make the difference when determining a student’s residency status. N.C. residents pay lower tuition rates than out-of-state residents.

 

For more information about College Application Week and how PCC can help, please contact Student Services at 252-249-1851, ext. 3001, or by email studentservices@pamlicocc.edu.

 

“In our changing world, there’s never been a better time to reflect on what you want out of life and create a plan to get there,” said PCC Success Coach/Counselor Cristy Lewis Warner. “Let us help you create your plan to a better tomorrow!”

 

For more information about CFNC’s Countdown to College campaign activities, including College Application Week, please visit https://www.cfnc.org/.

 


Staff to Assist with FAFSA Forms Oct. 23

 

October 7, 2021

Completing the FAFSA form is the essential first step to securing financial aid for college, and Pamlico Community College is stepping forward to help prospective students and their families do just that for the 2022-23 academic year.

 

PCC Student Services staffers will be available from 9 a.m. to noon on Saturday, Oct. 23, in the college library in the Johnson Building to help students complete the online document, formally known as the Free Application for Federal Student Aid.

 

Successfully completing the FAFSA determines a student’s eligibility for a wide array of federal, state and institution-based financial aid programs, including grants and scholarships, at nearly all American colleges and universities.

 

The event will be open to all prospective college students, even if they plan to attend college somewhere other than PCC. Pamlico’s participation on Oct. 23 is part of a statewide FAFSA Day effort to help N.C. students find the resources they need to attend college.

 

“We work hard at Pamlico Community College to make it as easy as possible for men and women to come to college and get started on improving their lives,” said PCC President Dr. Jim Ross. “FAFSA Day is another part of those efforts. Completing the FAFSA is essential for all college and university students because it gives schools a baseline to award financial aid. Our Student Services staffers will be available to work with students, their parents and others so they can get the FAFSA process moving for the 2022-23 academic year.”

 

Setting up a Federal Student Aid ID number and then completing the online FAFSA form can be a little challenging, particularly for high school students and their parents who have not tried it before, said PCC’s Director of Financial Aid Meredith Beeman.

 

“FAFSA Day will be most beneficial for first-timers,” she said, adding that each participating high school student should bring at least one parent or guardian to the event.

 

To successfully complete the FAFSA, participants will need to supply information on household income, the number of children in the home and important facts such as Social Security numbers and dates of birth, organizers say.

 

Federal education officials use the information on the completed FAFSA form to determine both how much a student and his or her family can reasonably afford to pay toward college expenses and how much aid he or she is eligible for, regardless of source.

 

Institutions, including PCC, then can use that information to match students with possible scholarships or other federal or state financial aid options.

 

“It is critical to supply all of the data, otherwise you will not be eligible for federal, state and institutional grants,” Beeman said, adding all prospective college students are encouraged to complete the FAFSA, even if they don’t believe they will qualify for a federal Pell Grant.

 

Students and their families who take part in FAFSA Day should bring their 2020 tax returns and/or 2020 W-2 forms. Because of the sensitive nature of people’s financial information, special care will be taken to ensure participants will not be able to overhear each others’ answers, Beeman said.

 

She said completing the form takes about 30 minutes. By the end of the process, students and their parents should have an estimate of the amount of aid for which they qualify.

 

“The financial aid process can seem a little intimidating, but Vice President of Student Services Jamie Gibbs and the entire Student Services team are here to help, not just on Oct. 23 but throughout the year,” Ross said. “Contact them to see how PCC can assist you.”

 

For more information about FAFSA Day, please contact Beeman at 252-249-1851, ext. 3026, or mbeeman@pamlicocc.edu.

 


Catch Up, Get Ahead with B-Term Courses

 

September 28, 2021

Pamlico Community College soon will be offering a slate of half-semester curriculum courses that are designed to help students get caught up on the Fall 2021 semester or get ahead in their studies.

 

These classes, known as “B-Term courses,” will be offered online. They will feature the same amount of academic material as a full-term class, but in a half-semester timeframe.

 

B-Term courses are a great way for motivated students to catch up if they missed this semester’s start date or to move ahead in their programs.

 

“For students who apply late to the college after our fall registration period has closed, B-Term courses are an opportunity to get started on their programs of study,” said Instructor Neil Callahan, who oversees the college’s academic advising efforts. “These courses represent a mixture of some of our general education offerings that will plug into many of the programs of study we offer here at Pamlico.  It’s a way for the student to ‘get their feet wet’ before diving into a full slate of courses during the spring semester.”

 

Registration for these classes is underway. The courses will begin Oct. 18 and will end Dec. 13.

 

The course offerings will include:

 

* ACA 111 – College Student Success

* CIS 110 – Introduction to Computers and its corresponding lab

* EDU 153 – Health, Safety & Nutrition

* ENG 111 – Writing and Inquiry

* GEL 111 – Geology and its corresponding lab

* HIS 131 – American History I

 

PCC President Dr. Jim Ross said the slate of B-Term courses showed the college’s commitment to meeting students’ needs.

 

“We are always looking for ways to help students achieve their academic goals, and these B-Term courses are part of that effort,” said PCC President Dr. Jim Ross. “I encourage men and women to check out these courses to see if they fit their needs.”

 

For more information about B-Term courses, current students are encouraged to contact their advisors. New students are encouraged to contact Student Services at 252-249-1851, ext. 3001, or studentservices@pamlicocc.edu.

 


Retired Judge Speaks at Constitution Day

 

September 20, 2021

In order to preserve the principles of the U.S. Constitution, judges sometimes have to make difficult and unpopular decisions, a retired N.C. judge told more than 50 students, employees and others at Pamlico Community College’s Constitution Day observance on Thursday, Sept. 16.

 

Retired Senior Superior Court Judge James Ragan III also said it was important to recognize the role North Carolina played in the shaping of the Constitution’s Bill of Rights and in the history of the Colonial and Revolutionary War periods.

 

Ragan, a Pamlico County native and former member of both the college’s Board of Trustees and its Foundation Board of Directors, was the featured speaker at the event, which took place in the college’s Delamar Center.

 

“It was a treat to have Judge Ragan share his thoughts about the Constitution and its place in our lives,” said PCC President Dr. Jim Ross. “The United States Constitution is the legal basis for us having freedoms that others in history have only dreamed of having. Judge Ragan has an outstanding background to speak on Constitutional issues, and he is a treasured friend to our college.”

 

American colleges that receive federal funding are required to observe Constitution Day, which commemorates the day in 1787 when the final draft of the U.S. Constitution was signed in Philadelphia. PCC held its observance on Sept. 16, one day before the official Sept. 17 Constitution Day.

 

Ragan told the audience about occasions early in his career as a courtroom attorney when his clients’ best defense was to challenge how the evidence against them had been collected. By utilizing the Fourth Amendment’s prohibition against unreasonable searches and seizures, defendants occasionally were able to suppress the evidence against them, he said.

 

Ragan recounted a similar incident when, as a Superior Court judge, the Fourth Amendment was the guiding principle behind his decision involving a defendant on trial for drug trafficking in a small county in northeastern North Carolina.

 

After reviewing a search warrant, he ruled the evidence against the defendant had been obtained improperly, meaning it had to be suppressed and could not be used against him in court. The decision upset courthouse staffers and many others, Ragan recalled.

 

“Sometimes it is not a popular thing to uphold the Constitution,” he said, adding that judges must do so if the document is to mean anything, even if it costs them votes in a future election.

 

“You see how uncomfortable it can be,” Ragan said.

 

The retired judge also discussed how North Carolinians in the Colonial period had grown angry at the royal government over issues such as taxation and trial by jury, which eventually led the provincial assembly to call for independence from Great Britain in 1776.

 

Ragan recounted how North Carolina had been the 12th of the original 13 colonies to ratify the Constitution, primarily because of its insistence that the document include a Bill of Rights. North Carolina finally ratified the 1787 Constitution on Nov. 21, 1789.

 

Lastly, the retired judge encouraged the audience to explore their families’ history during the Revolutionary period so they can learn more about the role North Carolina played in the founding of the country.

 

“It makes me very proud to be a party of this country,” Ragan said.

 

PCC’s Constitution Day observance was organized by the college’s Student Services division.

 


High Employee Morale Leads to Excellence

 

September 9, 2021

Pamlico Community College employee high morale has skyrocketed the past five years, with a remarkable 95 percent of faculty and staff now expressing high morale. PCC high morale has increased nearly 9 percent this past year alone after increasing more than 50 percent in recent years. The 95 percent employee high morale rating is extremely unusual in higher education – or within almost any enterprise, for that matter. In contrast, national surveys show employee morale is declining with only 30 percent nationwide expressing high morale in their work. 

 

PCC President Dr. Jim Ross, who has led the effort to increase morale at the college, strongly believes treating people well and the high employee morale it brings must be a top priority and is essential to serving students and the community with excellence. “When employees have high morale, this brings increased quality of work,” he said. “Our dedicated and caring employees are to be commended for embracing such a positive and uplifting team spirit in embracing our shared vision of pursuing ambitious and noble goals of service to others,” Ross said. “I believe the extremely high morale that has been achieved is a key reason why PCC has significantly improved and become a national leader in student success and in overall rankings of the college.” 

 

WalletHub this year ranked PCC number 1 among all community colleges in America in student educational outcomes. This national analysis used U.S. Department of Education data by scoring each college in first-year retention rate; graduation rate; transfer-out rate; degree and certificates awarded per 100 full-time-equivalent students; student-faculty ratio; share of full-time faculty; and other factors. PCC was ranked number 1 in the nation in student success.

 

SmartAsset, using U.S. Department of Education data, ranked community colleges nationwide and this year honored Pamlico Community College with the prestigious ranking as the No. 2 best community college in America. The highest score earned was 100, with PCC earning a score of 99.97. PCC graduation/transfer rate, an extremely important indicator of student success, has increased by a seldom-seen amount of 20 percent over the past three years. The PCC graduation/transfer rate is now 76 percent, nearly double the national average.    

 

For each of these achievements, Ross emphasizes they reflect the “amazing PCC faculty and staff” and are made possible because of the employees’ increased high morale. The 2020-21 PCC Faculty & Staff Satisfaction Survey conducted this year found for the morale question that the highest percentage ever say they are treated as “valued members” of the college team. Nearly 100 full- and part-time employees participated in this year’s survey.

 

“We strive to inspire our treasured employees to change lives, feel sincerely appreciated, and have fun every day,” Ross said. “It is wonderful that our amazing employees are enjoying their work even more each year, as evidenced by these surveys the past five years,” Ross said. “Seeing such a large increase in high morale this past year-despite the coronavirus-is astonishing.”    

 

PCC Vice President for Financial Services Sherry Raby stated that “the dramatic increase in morale that PCC has experienced in the past few years is a direct result of the culture of inclusion, collaboration, and open communication” that has been nurtured under President Ross’ leadership. Through his example, she said, “employees’ productive, positive, and professional actions are acknowledged and openly recognized. The value that each employee brings as a member of the PCC team is frequently reaffirmed and celebrated. The PCC environment has been transformed into one that is energetic, progressive, and impactful,” she said.  

 


Health Care Courses Start in September

 

August 30, 2021

Several of Pamlico Community College’s popular, short-term health care courses will begin in September, including day and night sections of both Nurse Aide I and Phlebotomy Technician.

 

These courses can be completed quickly and can lead to great jobs in the area’s growing health care sector.

 

Scholarships are even available for qualified students!

 

“Our curriculum registration period has passed, but our Continuing Education division is gearing up with additional courses and programs for the new semester,” said PCC President Dr. Jim Ross. “These courses are designed to be convenient for adult learners and they can lead to fantastic opportunities. With special financial aid programs available, there has never been a better time to check out what our Continuing Education folks have to offer.”

 

Upcoming courses include:

 

* Nurse Aide I, including both a daytime section and an evening section of this popular class.

Both the day and evening classes will begin Sept. 8. The day class will meet from 8:30 a.m. to 4 p.m. Mondays and Wednesdays, and the evening class will meet from 5:30 to 9:30 p.m. Mondays and Wednesdays.

 

* Nurse Aide II, which is an evening class for Nurse Aides who want to continue their studies. This class will start Sept. 23 and will meet from 5:30 to 9:30 p.m. Tuesdays and Thursdays.

 

* Phlebotomy Technician, including both a daytime section and an evening option. Both sections will start Sept. 28 and will meet Tuesdays and Thursdays. The daytime class will meet from 8:30 a.m. to 4 p.m., and the evening class will meet from 5:30 to 9:30 p.m.

 

* Cardiac Monitor Technician, which will start Sept. 28. This class will meet Tuesdays and Thursdays from 1 to 4 p.m.

 

In addition, registration is underway for a new offering of the college’s Physical Therapy Aide course, which is expected to get underway in late September.

 

“Our new Dialysis Technician program has gotten off to a strong start, and we plan to offer additional health care courses and programs later this semester,” Ross said. “Contact us today to see how we can help you find a new career helping others.”

 

For more information or to register for any of the upcoming courses, please contact Lori Giles at lgiles@pamlicocc.edu or 252-249-1851, ext. 3015.


2 New Sections of NA Course Scheduled

 

August 25, 2021

Seats are still available in both a daytime section and an evening section of PCC’s popular Nurse Aide I course.

 

Both the day and evening classes will begin Sept. 8. The day class will meet from 8:30 a.m. to 4 p.m. Mondays and Wednesdays, and the evening class will meet from 5:30 to 9:30 p.m. Mondays and Wednesdays.

 

For more information or to register, please contact Lori Giles at lgiles@pamlicocc.edu or 252-249-1851, ext. 3015.

 


Registration for CCP Set for Aug. 23-25

 

August 16, 2021

“I believe the Career & College Promise program is the best deal in American higher education today,” says Pamlico Community College President Dr. Jim Ross. “Local students and their families can literally save thousands of dollars with this program while getting a head start on a college degree or a great hands-on career.”

 

Ross is referring to the popular N.C. Career & College Promise (CCP) program, which allows motivated high school juniors and seniors to take tuition-free college courses offered by the college. Registration for those courses is set for next week in Bayboro!

 

The credits that high schoolers earn by passing the tuition-free courses at PCC can be applied to an Associate in Arts degree or an Associate in Science degree. The credits transfer to all public colleges and universities in North Carolina, and to many of the state’s private colleges and universities as well.

 

Additionally, CCP students can choose to explore hands-on career courses such as Welding and Cosmetology while in high school, which can give them a head start on a great profession.

 

Taking these college-level courses while in high school helps qualified students get ahead in their studies and save lots of money. The courses are open to high school juniors and seniors who attend Pamlico County High School, Arapahoe Charter School, Pamlico Christian Academy or a home school.

 

CCP registration is scheduled for Monday, Tuesday and Wednesday, Aug. 23, 24 and 25, from 8 a.m. to 3 p.m. at PCC’s Bayboro Center, which is located next door to PCHS.

 

There are two Career & College Promise pathways:

 

• College Transfer Pathway (CTP) requires the completion of at least 30 semester hours of transfer

   courses including English and mathematics.

 

• Career and Technical Education Pathway (CTE) leads to a certificate or diploma aligned with a high

   school career cluster.

 

Subject to future restrictions related to COVID-19, classes are offered in a face-to-face format, an online format or in a combination of both.

 

The CCP program has been great for motivated students. For example, when Riley Callahan graduated in 2020 from Pamlico County High School, he took with him 50 hours of transferable college credit, which he carried to East Carolina University.

 

Those hours, which Callahan earned by taking tuition-free CCP courses while in high school, gave him a tremendous head start on his journey toward earning a bachelor’s degree.

 

PCHS graduate Cecilia Holton, Class of 2020, was eligible to begin her professional career as a hairstylist, thanks to the CCP program. She began her Cosmetology studies as a high school junior and graduated with her Cosmetology diploma from PCC in July 2020.

 

Because Holton took PCC courses through the CCP program while in high school, she did not have to pay college tuition and began her full-time, professional career as a teenager.

 

Derek Godwin, PCC’s director of CCP program, can answer specific questions about course selections and programs. Contact him at 252-745-7349 or at dgodwin@pamlicocc.edu.

 


Get Ready to Register at America’s No. 1

Community College for Student Success!

 

 

August 2, 2021

The time is almost here: Registration for the Fall 2021 semester at Pamlico Community College is next week!

 

New and returning curriculum students can sign up for classes Monday and Tuesday, Aug. 9 and 10, from 8:30 a.m. to 7 p.m.

 

Historic financial aid programs will be available this semester. For example, qualified Class of 2021 high school graduates can apply for the N.C. Longleaf Commitment Grant, which will cover tuition and fees for this semester and next! Participating students will be eligible to renew the grant for the Fall 2022 and Spring 2023 semesters!

 

The college also is able to offer financial assistance to other students as well, including scholarships. Students interested in short-term Continuing Education/Workforce Development courses also are eligible for great financial aid programs.

 

“There has never been a better time than now to enroll at Pamlico Community College,” said PCC President Dr. Jim Ross. “Generous financial aid programs have been put in place, and the college will be offering a full slate of seated and online courses this fall. Higher education is the best way for people to improve their lives and the lives of their families, and all of us at PCC are ready to help men and women get started and succeed.”

 

A nationally recognized education is available right here at PCC. Pamlico recently was ranked No. 1 in America for students’ educational outcomes by WalletHub, and just last month, the college was named the No. 2 community college in America by SmartAsset, a New York-based personal finance technology company.

 

PCC can prepare you for a great career or can get you started on a four-year degree for a fraction of the cost of university tuition. The college’s curriculum courses feature small classes with a 9-to-1 student-faculty ratio to give you more personalized attention.

 

Students who are planning to pursue a bachelor’s degree can save thousands of dollars by attending PCC for their first two years. Approved credits earned at PCC transfer directly into the state’s public university system and to many private colleges and universities in North Carolina.

 

The college offers Associate in Arts, Associate in Science and Associate in General Education two-year degree programs.

 

Pamlico also offers well-regarded allied health programs, including Medical Assisting and Medical Office Administration, and the college has unique-to-the area programs in Dental Laboratory TechnologyEnvironmental Management Technology and Environmental Science Technology.

 

Students interested in business are encouraged to check out PCC’s programs in Business Administration and Accounting and Finance, and those interested in “helping” careers should take a look at PCC’s public service programs in Criminal Justice Technology, Early Childhood Education and Human Services Technology.

 

For men and women interested in great hands-on careers, PCC offers programs in CosmetologyEsthetics, Electrical Systems Technology and Welding.

 

“We are proud to offer a wide range of programs, from university transfer options to great career-focused curricula,” Ross said. “We encourage everyone to check out what we have to offer right here in Pamlico County.”

 

For more information about registration, email studentservices@pamlicocc.edu, call 252-249-1851, ext. 3001, or visit Student Services in the Johnson Building on campus.

 

Sandy Wall can be reached at 252-249-1851, ext. 3010, or swall@pamlicocc.edu.

 


Enrollment Open for New Dialysis Program

 

 

July 26, 2021

Enrollment is now open for Pamlico Community College’s new Dialysis Technician program, which will train men and women to operate the lifesaving equipment used to filter the renal patients’ blood. PCC becomes one of the first colleges in the state to offer this vital health care training program, which is heavily in demand in North Carolina.

 

Kacynthia Ingram, a New Bern nurse originally from Ohio, will teach this program’s course of study, which is scheduled to begin Aug. 24 at the college’s Grantsboro campus. It will meet from 8:30 a.m. to 4 p.m. Tuesdays and Thursdays through Oct. 29.

 

The Dialysis Technician program is part of the college’s commitment to offer more short-term training programs that respond to industry’s needs and that can lead to good jobs in all sectors, including in the area’s growing health care sector.

 

“We are extremely pleased to offer this new program,” said PCC President Dr. Jim Ross. “We worked hard this past year to overcome all obstacles to create this program after we learned there is an urgent need in our region for more technicians. We invested heavily in two new state-of-the-art dialysis machines and related equipment that will be outstanding teaching tools for our students. Most importantly, our students who complete this will be qualified to secure good jobs that help improve the lives of kidney patients and their families. I am extremely proud of Lori Giles and our other employees for developing this program, securing state-of-the art equipment, and hiring a highly qualified instructor for it in record time so we can offer it this fall.”

 

PCC Chair of Continuing Education and Technical Programs Lori Giles added she has already received inquiries from potential students about the new Dialysis Technician program, which is the first of its kind in PCC history.

 

“We are extremely excited about this,” she said. “There is a clear need to train qualified technicians, and we at the college are proud to be able to meet that need.”

 

In North Carolina, web-based job boards Indeed and ZipRecruiter report average hourly wages for dialysis technicians range between $16.55 and $18.47 per hour, with higher pay available based on responsibilities and location.

 

Cost to enroll in the PCC’s Dialysis Technician course of study is $180. Scholarships are available for students who qualify.

 

In the course, students will learn the theoretical, technical and clinical skills needed to maintain dialysis equipment and to provide patient care to patients being treated for chronic renal diseases. The class format includes lecture, lab and off-site clinical activities.

 

“Our college has created numerous new short-term training programs recently in health care and a variety of other fields,” said Ross, “and we have ambitious plans to add a dramatic number of new programs going forward in health care and other areas. Pamlico Community College is working hard to train men and women for the important, life-improving jobs available in this region.”

 

For more information or to register for the Dialysis Technician course of study, please call 252-249-1851, ext. 3015, or email lgiles@pamlicocc.edu.

 

Sandy Wall can be reached at 252-249-1851, ext. 3010, or swall@pamlicocc.edu.

 


View PCC’s Fall 2021 Course Schedule Here

 

 

July 20, 2021

Pamlico Community College’s 32-page Fall 2021 Course Schedule booklet is available HERE.

 


Pamlico Ranked No. 2 in America for 2021

 

 

July 20, 2021

Pamlico Community College continues to add to its fast-growing list of recent prestigious national recognitions for excellence. SmartAsset, a New York-based personal finance technology company, recently published “Best Community Colleges in America-2021 Edition”. Using U.S. Department of Education data, SmartAsset honored Pamlico Community College with the prestigious ranking as the No. 2 best community college in America.

 

Pamlico Community College (PCC) has earned an extensive array of national recognitions in recent years. For example, the college is the nation’s premiere community college in earning an unprecedented number of SmartAsset elite top-3 rankings, having been ranked in the top 3 or better four times in most recent years while no other college has achieved this more than twice.  

 

SmartAsset’s 2021 rankings were based on 2019-20 federal data from 820 community colleges across America. The company reviewed the colleges’ graduation/transfer rates, student-to-teacher ratios and cost over two academic semesters to compile its rankings.

 

PCC received outstanding scores for its graduation/transfer rate of its students of 76 percent, its student-instructor ratio of 9-to-1; and its exceptionally low cost and affordability for in-state students, according to SmartAsset.

 

PCC President Dr. Jim Ross said he was humbled and extremely pleased with the No. 2 ranking among the nation’s best community colleges, and he credited the “extraordinary” work of PCC employees as the reason for the national recognition.

 

“Our college is greatly blessed to have dedicated and caring employees who are selflessly committed to the noble goal to make lives better,” Ross said, “and they make lives better day in and day out as they work tirelessly to make our college the best it can possibly be in serving our students and our community. “

 

News of PCC’s No. 2 national ranking by SmartAsset comes amid multiple other state and national honors Pamlico Community College has received in recent years.

 

One of the most important, Ross said, is being ranked by WalletHub as the No. 1 community college in the nation in student success. To arrive at its ranking, WalletHub used U.S. Department of Education data for graduation rates, transfer-out rates, degree and certificates awarded per 100 full-time-equivalent students, student-faculty ratios, share of full-time faculty, dual enrollment or distance education programs, and other data for community colleges across America.

 

“To be ranked No. 1 among all the outstanding community colleges in the nation in student success is an extremely important achievement for our employees that our college cherishes because we care so very much about helping our students succeed,” Ross said. 

 

PCC also is ranked this year as North Carolina’s best community college in providing online instruction by Affordable Colleges Online. In addition, the Aspen Institute named PCC to its 2018-19 prestigious list of 150 elite community colleges in America.

 

Topping the SmartAsset rankings for 2021 was Brunswick Community College. In addition to Brunswick at No. 1 and Pamlico at No. 2, other North Carolina community colleges ranked in the top 10 included Carteret (3), Montgomery (4), Sampson (5), College of the Albemarle (6), Catawba Valley (8) and Randolph (9).

 

For more information about enrolling at Pamlico Community College, please call 252-249-1851, ext. 3001.

 

For more information about the 2021 SmartAsset rankings, please visit https://smartasset.com/data-studies/best-community-colleges-in-america-2021.


College Honored for Efforts to Hire Vets

 

 

July 12, 2021

Pamlico Community College was honored again recently for its efforts to hire and support employees who are U.S. military veterans.

 

The college received an Annual National Employment Service Award from the American Legion and NCWorks at a June 30 ceremony in Jacksonville.

 

PCC instructors William Adams and Ronald Scott represented the college at the event. Both men are U.S. Army veterans.

 

The award recognizes the college’s efforts to hire military veterans and to ensure their economic well-being. PCC received a similar honor in 2019 when it was named Medium Employer of the Year by the Eastern Carolina Workforce Development Board, the NCWorks Career Center and the N.C. National Guard.

 

“We are very proud and deeply honored to receive this award,” said PCC President Dr. Jim Ross. “Veterans are hard-working, dedicated members of our team here at the college, and they are wonderful colleagues. We are especially pleased to receive this recognition so close to Independence Day.”

 

About one-eighth of the college’s full-time employees are veterans, and two vets – Scott Frazer and Sherry Raby – are vice presidents at PCC. In those roles, Frazer and Raby make up half of the influential, four-member Executive Council that reports directly to the president on college operations.

 

This year’s award is further evidence of PCC’s ongoing efforts to make the college as friendly and supportive as possible to members of the military, veterans and their families. Earlier this year, the college was recognized as a Military Friendly School for 2021-22.

 

“We are proud of these recognitions,” Ross said. “It’s important that we welcome, hire and support the men and women who have given so much to the defense of our country.”

 


Callahan Can Help You Register Now!

 

 

June 24 2021

Students who will be returning to Pamlico Community College for the upcoming Fall 2021 semester can go ahead and register for classes now and avoid the August rush.

 

PCC Instructor Neil Callahan, who oversees the college’s Early Childhood Education program and serves as PCC’s coordinator of academic advising, is working this summer to help returning students choose the correct courses so they can stay on track.

 

Callahan knows the ins and outs of academic advising and is ready to assist students by phone, online or by appointment.

 

“Also, if someone would like to become a new student at PCC this fall, I want them to feel free to contact me as well,” he said. “I will explain the process to them.”

 

PCC President Dr. Jim Ross said bringing Callahan aboard for the summer is another way the college is working to keep students moving forward.

 

“Neil Callahan is extremely knowledgeable about academic advising,” he said. “He brings a tremendous amount of experience to the table. He is certain to give students the best advice he can.”

 

Callahan not only brings experience to his job, he brings a can-do spirit and a drive for excellence. Earlier this year, he was voted the college’s Instructor of the Year by PCC students.

 

A native of Northampton County and a graduate of East Carolina University, Callahan has worked as a faculty member at PCC since January 2003.

 

At PCC, Callahan oversees a number of important academic initiatives, including both the Pirate Promise co-admission agreement with ECU and the ECU Partnership Teach effort for prospective educators.

 

“Neil’s commitment to excellence and dedication to helping students is an example of why PCC is ranked the No. 1 community college in America for students’ educational outcomes by WalletHub,” Ross said. “He is available this summer to help students choose the right courses so they can achieve their educational goals and improve their lives.”

 

Returning (and new) students are encouraged to reach out to Callahan at 252-229-9710 or at ncallahan@pamlicocc.edu for help with advising and registration.

 

As always, new and returning students also can reach out to PCC’s Student Services division for assistance at 252-249-1851, ext. 3001, or studentservices@pamlicocc.edu.

 

The formal registration period for the Fall 2021 semester is scheduled for Aug. 9 and 10 from 8:30 a.m. to 7 p.m. Seated classes will begin Aug. 19, and online classes start Aug. 26.

 

Sandy Wall can be reached at 252-249-1851, ext. 3010, or swall@pamlicocc.edu.

 


2021 HS Grads to Get Tuition/Fees Covered

 

 

June 14 2021

A new state grant program will cover the tuition and fees for eligible Class of 2021 high school graduates who enroll in a curriculum program at Pamlico Community College for the Fall 2021 semester. For many local students, all tuition and fees at PCC will be paid by it.

 

Under the program, named the North Carolina Longleaf Commitment Grant, students who receive the grant will be eligible to renew it for the 2022-23 academic year, meaning their tuition and fees could be covered for each semester (not including summer terms) through the Spring 2023 semester!

 

The grant program is open to full- and part-time students who plan to earn a degree or who want to attain transferable college credit. It is funded through the Governor’s Emergency Education Relief (GEER) fund through federal COVID-19 relief packages, and it will end at the conclusion of the Spring 2023 semester.

 

Recent high school graduates are urged to take advantage of this opportunity to get a high-quality education close to home with no out-of-pocket costs for tuition and fees, said PCC President Dr. Jim Ross.

 

“The North Carolina Longleaf Commitment Grant is an extraordinary opportunity for our community. It is a wonderful way for members of this year’s graduating class of high schoolers to enroll at America’s No. 1 community college for students’ educational outcomes,” he said. “We have a great deal to offer students here at PCC, and there is no better time for recent high school graduates to contact us and see how we can get them started on a great career or on the path to a four-year degree.”

 

Students must meet eligibility requirements to receive the Longleaf Commitment Grant. They include:

 

* Be a North Carolina resident and a 2021 high school graduate

* Be a first-time college student (CCP students are eligible.)

* Enroll in a curriculum program during the 2021-22 academic year

* Enroll in at least six credit hours per semester

* Complete the Free Application for Federal Student Aid (FAFSA) form for 2021-22 and have an

   Expected Family Contribution from $0 to $15,000, and

* Renew the FAFSA for 2022-23 and meet the Satisfactory Academic Progress requirements of PCC.

 

While tuition and fees are covered under the grant, some expenses, including books, are not. However, eligible students could have access to other financial aid opportunities available at PCC that could help offset those expenses.

 

PCC Director of Financial Aid Meredith Beeman and PCC Vice President of Student Services Jamie Gibbs are available to answer questions about the Longleaf Commitment Grant and to help students begin the enrollment process, including the critical step of completing the FAFSA form.

 

They can be contacted at 252-249-1851, ext. 3001, or by email at studentservices@pamlicocc.edu.

Successfully completing the FAFSA also is key to other financial aid programs at the college, including grants and scholarships, PCC leaders say.

 

PCC offers small class sizes with a 9-to-1 student-to-instructor ratio, which means lots of individual attention. The college also features seated and online courses, and has scheduled a full, pre-pandemic slate of classes for the upcoming Fall 2021 semester.

 

“We are thrilled that the young men and young women who graduated high school this year after going through the pandemic have such good news with this extraordinary opportunity to prepare themselves for much better days ahead,” Ross said. “I encourage them and their parents to see how we can help.”

 

Pamlico Community College is ranked this year as the No. 1 community college in America in student educational outcomes. This ranking as the nation’s best in student success came from WalletHub after analyzing more than 700 community colleges across all 50 states utilizing student success data from the U.S. Department of Education.

 


Financial Assistance is Available Here!

 

 

May 27, 2021

Financial help is available for you at Pamlico Community College! Don’t let a lack of resources stop you from reaching your educational goals!

 

For the upcoming 2021-22 academic year, the college will offer many financial aid opportunities that can assist you if you are returning to school or enrolling for the first time.

 

The college offers:

 

-Pell grants

-Federal Supplemental Education Opportunity grants

-Federal Work-Study

-HEERF III grants

-State grants

-Workforce Innovation and Opportunity Act (WIOA) funds

 

In addition, the college has several local and institutional scholarships available for students who qualify!

 

“Our college is fortunate to be able to offer financial assistance from a variety of sources,” said PCC President Dr. Jim Ross. “I would encourage everyone who is thinking about enrolling in college to contact us as soon as possible to see how we can help.”

 

To determine your eligibility for many of these options, you will need to complete a Free Application for Federal Student Aid (FAFSA) form. The FAFSA is available at www.studentaid.gov.

 

PCC also is able to certify for VA Education Benefits! Only eligible veterans, dependents or active duty service members who have obtained eligibility with VA (or have received advance approval from their ESO or service if using Tuition Assistance) can utilize VA Education Benefits.

 

For questions about eligibility for any of these programs or to get help completing the FAFSA, please contact PCC Director of Financial Aid Meredith Beeman at 252-249-1851, ext. 3026, or mbeeman@pamlicocc.edu.

 

“Pamlico Community College is a wonderful place to discover a career field or to get started on earning a four-year degree,” Ross said. “We are honored to be recognized as the top community college in America for students’ educational outcomes, based on U.S. Department of Education data, and our tuition and fee are far lower than a university. Contact the college today to see how we can match you with the resources you need to achieve your dreams!”

 


Area Woman Overcomes Setbacks to Earn GED

 

 

May 24, 2021

School just never came easy for Crystal H. Tribby.

 

The 40-year-old Merritt woman has plenty of bad memories of struggling to read and understand material.

 

From the age of 7 onwards, school was a place of confusion, frustration and disappointment for Tribby, who attended several local schools and even tried a homeschool.

 

“School was difficult for me,” she said recently. “I felt like I was too dumb, too stupid.”

 

Unsurprisingly, Tribby dropped out of high school at age 16 before earning her diploma. In subsequent years, she was able to earn a living, often holding down multiple jobs, and she had two sons, but her lack of a high school diploma kept her from moving forward.

 

Finally, at age 36 and after 20 years away from the classroom, Tribby decided to give school one more shot. She enrolled in the free College and Career Readiness/Basic Skills program at Pamlico Community College with the goal of earning her high school equivalency and proving to everyone, including herself, that she could achieve great things in the classroom.

 

“I felt I had to prove I could do it,” Tribby said. “I’d tell myself: You’re worth more than you know.”

 

Classes at PCC were tough, and she often struggled as she had in the past. But Tribby persevered and refused to give up. She improved her reading and became better at math.

 

“I’m not failing if I keep going,” she said.

 

Earlier this spring when Tribby took her final exam for her GED, she was convinced she had failed. Instead, she had passed, and when told the news by phone, Tribby broke down sobbing in a Walmart parking lot.

 

“I cried like a baby,” she said with a smile.

 

The culmination of all of her hard work occurred May 14 when Tribby, clad in a blue cap and gown, walked on a red carpet outside the college’s Delamar Center to accept her high school equivalency from PCC President Dr. Jim Ross.

 

Accompanying her for the event were six vehicle loads of family members, friends and supporters, including her husband.

 

“Crystal Tribby has worked extremely hard and deserves the attention she is receiving for this accomplishment,” Ross said. “She overcame many obstacles, but refused to quit. We salute her and look forward to seeing what she does next.”

 

Tribby credits her faith as well as her friend Angel Gell for encouraging her to stick with it. She also credits PCC Instructor Amy Burke with helping her develop learning strategies that helped her overcome her anxieties.

 

Tribby also said she appreciated Burke’s patience with her.

 

“I couldn’t afford to give her a penny for every headache I gave her,” Tribby said with a chuckle.

 

Se also thanked the college’s staff for its kindness and support.

 

Tribby plans to write a book about her experiences and would love to become a motivational speaker. In the meantime, she is considering enrolling in the college’s Esthetics program.

 

Tribby encourages men and women who have been unable to finish high school to try again. It’s not easy, but it’s worth it, she says.

 

“I know – I’ve been there,” Tribby said. “You can overcome and be anything if you find out what your talent is.”

 

For more information about PCC’s free College and Career Readiness/Basic Skills program, which includes GED instruction and English as a Second Language courses, please contact Lori Giles at 252-249-1851, ext. 3015, or lgiles@pamlicocc.edu.

 


Graduates Honored at May 14 Commencement

 

 

May 17, 2021

Pamlico Community College honored members of its Class of 2021 one by one Friday evening, May 14, during a special drive-thru Commencement ceremony outside the Delamar Center at the Grantsboro campus.

 

The unusual, but extremely joyous, ceremony culminated an extraordinary era for members of this class of PCC graduates, who overcame the challenges of a worldwide pandemic to earn their respective degrees, diplomas and certificates.

 

“This event was a wonderful way for all of us to salute this year’s graduates for their achievements,” said PCC President Dr. Jim Ross. “We hosted a similar outdoor Commencement for the Class of 2020 last July. While both of these ceremonies differed from our traditional graduation events, they gave all of us an opportunity to speak with each graduate individually, to thank their families and friends for their support, and to wish all of them well in their careers and future endeavors. These outdoor Commencements really were an uplifting way to honor two resilient groups of graduates.”

 

This year’s prospective graduates were allowed to bring family members and friends to the ceremony, which took place under a row of canopies posted above the sidewalk outside the Delamar Center’s north entrance.

 

Each honoree was joined by family members and friends for a walk along a red carpet from the curb toward the podium. About 10 feet from the podium, family members and friends stopped, and the prospective graduate continued forward to the podium to hear his or her name called and to receive their hard-earned credential.

 

After receiving their credential, the graduate and his or her family members and friends were invited inside the Delamar Center to have a complimentary photograph taken by a college faculty member. Those photos will be emailed to the graduates this week.

 

After each group returned to its vehicles, the next group drove forward for its walk along the red carpet. “Pomp and Circumstance” played on a portable speaker nearby, and the weather was sunny, mild and pleasant.

 

Some graduates wore blue caps and gowns. A few graduates decorated their caps, and many vehicles were adorned with signs, balloons and congratulatory messages.

 

Twenty-seven graduates participated in the ceremony. Overall, 45 men and women completed the coursework required to graduate with associate’s degrees, diplomas and certificates from PCC over the academic year.

 

Ninety-six academic credentials were awarded. Eight students earned at least two associate’s degrees, while graduate Damius K. Davis earned three associate’s degrees (Accounting and Finance, Business Administration and General Education) as well as five certificates.

 

In addition, 44 credentials were earned by students in the college’s Continuing Education division, including certifications for Cardiac Monitor Technician, Medication Aide, Nurse Aide I and II, Phlebotomy Technician and High School Equivalency.

 

The class’s two youngest members are 17, and its oldest member is 60.

 

During the ceremony, Annemarie R. Brown of Jacksonville was honored as the 2021 Academic Excellence Award and also was named the college’s Student of the Year. Brown graduated at the event with her Associate in Applied Science degrees in Environmental Management Technology and Environmental Science Technology, as well as three certificates.

 

As the recipient of the Academic Excellence Award, Brown becomes Pamlico’s 2021 honoree in the N.C. Community College System’s “Great within the 58” list of high-achieving students.

 

Instructor Zac Schnell, who nominated Brown for the award, presented her with the honors.

 

Commencement is usually the occasion when annual awards, such as Instructor of the Year, Staff Member of the Year and Adjunct Faculty Member of the Year, are presented. Those honors were announced at a May 6 event.

 

“Commencement is always the best day at the college,” Ross said. “While the pandemic created challenges for all of us, we were determined to host safe, but fun, ceremonies to honor this year’s class as well as last year’s class. These graduates have overcome significant challenges, and we are very proud of all of them.”

 


College Salutes Top Employees of 2020-21

 

 

May 13, 2021

Pamlico Community College saluted three of its most outstanding employees for the 2020-21 academic year during a special collegewide awards ceremony May 6.

 

The college’s annual employee awards, including Instructor of the Year, Adjunct Faculty Member of the Year, Staff Member of the Year and others, traditionally have been handed out at Commencement.

 

However, because of the continuing COVID-19 pandemic, this year’s award recognition event was moved online, just as it had been in 2020. The event took place via Zoom software.

 

Citing the pandemic and the complications it had created, PCC President Dr. Jim Ross told colleagues that each of them deserved recognition for their teamwork, positive attitudes and dedication to student success in 2020 and 2021.

 

“We’re here to make lives better, and that’s what all of you do,” he said. “I thank each of you for facing the challenges and uncertainties that we had this year.”

 

PCC Vice President of Financial Services Sherry Raby, one of the key organizers of this year’s event, served as emcee. Leading off the event was the presentation of the Instructor of the Year award by Vice President of Instructional Services Michelle Willis.

 

The award is voted on by PCC students.

 

This year’s top faculty honor went to Instructor Neil Callahan, who oversees the college’s Early Childhood Education program. He also serves as PCC’s coordinator of academic advising and oversees a number of important academic initiatives, including both the Pirate Promise co-admission agreement with East Carolina University and the ECU Partnership Teach effort for prospective educators.

 

Willis called Callahan a “creative, patient and easygoing” instructor/advisor who works hard to help students and colleagues alike. Ross agreed, praising Callahan’s “commitment to help others” and his inclination not to seek credit.

 

Callahan, who, at the time of the ceremony, was helping move one of his sons home from college for the summer, joined the meeting from a parking lot to thank Ross and Willis for their kind words

 

Callahan is a native of Northampton County and a graduate of ECU. He has worked as an instructor at PCC since January 2003.

 

This year’s Adjunct Faculty Member of the Year award went to part-time Music Appreciation Instructor Dr. Stacey Russell, who teaches online courses from her home in West Virginia. Like the Instructor of the Year award, the Adjunct Faculty award is voted on by PCC students.

 

Willis said Russell’s personality and creativity made her a wonderful instructor and an asset for the college. Ross agreed, saying instructors such as Russell helped to make PCC a model for online instruction.

 

Russell is a native of Pennsylvania. She has worked for the college since 2018.

 

In addition to teaching online courses to traditional PCC students, she also teaches students who are enrolled in the college’s prison education program at Pamlico Correctional Institution. An accomplished flute player, Russell also is lecturer at West Virginia University and an adjunct instructor at Beaufort County Community College and Maryville University.

 

She earned a Doctorate of Music Arts in flute performance from the University of South Carolina. Russell also has a master’s degree from Wright State University and a bachelor’s degree from Cedarville University.

 

On her website, she writes about her belief in the power of music, posting, “I believe that music is powerful, can change lives, and should be accessible to everyone. This can be seen in how I teach, where I teach, and what I teach.”

 

PCC’s Staff Member of the Year award went to Bookstore Manager and Head Cashier Jennifer Paul. The award is voted on by PCC employees.

 

Raby, who announced the staff award recipient, noted Paul’s professionalism, reliability and customer service skills, while Ross spoke about Paul’s friendly disposition and willingness to represent the college at community events.

 

Paul, who lives in Merritt, attended Pamlico County High School. She is on her second stint at the college, having worked at PCC from 2004 to 2010 and then returning to the campus in 2015.

 

During her acceptance remarks, Paul praised her coworkers’ spirit of cooperation and their ability to handle a range of tasks.

 

“We couldn’t do it without teamwork,” she said.

 

PCC usually awards a Pamlico Correctional Institution (PCI) Instructor of the Year award and an Alumnus of the Year. Recipients for those awards have not been selected, although nominations are still being accepted for the Alumnus of the Year honor. For more information about nominating a PCC alumnus, please contact Michelle Noevere at mnoevere@pamlicocc.edu.

 

To conclude the event, Ross thanked PCC employees for all of their efforts during the pandemic and for their commitment to the college and community.

 

He also expressed appreciation for the kind words and other gestures of good will he and his family had received after the death of his son, Dr. Robert James “Bobby” Ross, earlier this year.

 

“All of you are tremendously precious,” Ross said. “My wife Pam and I have been so blessed by the love we have received from our entire community. We are deeply thankful.”

 


Great Scores, Prizes Highlight Tourney

 

 

May 10, 2021

Nearly 70 golfers swung the clubs Saturday to raise scholarship funds at the Pamlico Community College Foundation’s 21st Annual CarolinaEast Cup Fundraising Golf Tournament at Minnesott Yacht, Golf & Country Club.

 

The weather was sunny, cool and breezy, and the golfers’ scores were impressively low at the annual event, which returned to its normal May schedule for 2021 after being shifted to the fall in 2020 because of the COVID-19 pandemic.

 

Generous sponsors provided plenty of prizes for the competitors, who enjoyed a continental breakfast, a boxed lunch and a day of fun and laughs on the picturesque course.

 

Most importantly, the tournament raised more than $8,500 for student scholarships and other college

priorities.

 

“We had a fantastic turnout for this year’s tournament, with 17 teams participating,” said PCC President Dr. Jim Ross. “It was wonderful to see so many familiar faces at the event, and I could not be prouder of Foundation Executive Director Michelle Noevere and her team for organizing a wonderful event. As I’ve often said, we are fortunate to live in such a generous, supportive community.”

 

The large field of teams led tourney organizers to divide the men’s division into a First Flight and Second Flight. Generous prize bags filled with premium golf balls, golf gadgets and gift certificates to the Minnesott pro shop went to the first-, second- and third-place men’s teams in each flight, plus the top-placing mixed men’s-and-women’s teams. Each first-place team also won 18 holes with carts at area golf courses.

 

This year’s tournament also featured $125 cash prizes for golfers who hit closest to the pin on holes 5, 9, 12 and 14, prizes for players who hit closest to the curve on another hole, and a putting contest back at the clubhouse.

 

A 50-50 raffle, golf shirt giveaway and a hearty takeout lunch of steak sandwiches, potato salad and cake helped to round out the day.

 

In a spirit of keeping tourney participants safe and healthy, golfers and others were asked to wear masks when in large groups or indoors, but they were free to go maskless in small groups outdoors and during play. Tee times were staggered to keep teams separated on the course, and the awards ceremony took place outdoors rather than inside the clubhouse.

 

Several PCC students were on hand to assist with the tournament and to remind golfers and others of the reason for the event.

 

“Proceeds from our fundraising efforts, including the annual golf tournament, provide between 20 and 25 scholarships to hard-working PCC students each year,” Noevere said. “All of us with the Foundation are thankful to everyone who generously supported this year’s tournament because it makes a real difference in the lives of men and women who attend our college.”

 

Indeed, a spirit of generosity prevailed at the tourney. Derek Godwin, who won the 50-50 raffle, donated his $327.50 share back to the Foundation.

 

This year’s winners included:

First-place First Flight Men’s team: Billy Holton, Mitch Kominiarek, Frankie Martin and Barry Mills

First-place Second Flight Men’s Team: Jim Curry, Terry Knickerbocker, George Leslie and Gordon

Phenes

First-place Mixed team: Mickey Campbell, Tommy Campbell, Ben Hollowell and Jennie Hollowell

Second-place First Flight Men’s team: George Brooks, Ricky Cotton, Gary Dembart and Billy Flack

Second-place Second Flight Men’s team: Eric Harper, Will Harper, Jim Krauss and Matt Scott

Second-placed Mixed team: Ron Anderson, Carol Horne, Rex Horne and Gary Harrison

Third-place First Flight Men’s team (tie): Russell Ipock, Clay Jordan, Jack Kilpatrick and Rick Lilly;

Jay Foster, Hardy Jones, Nate Whiddon and David Williams

Third-place Second Flight Men’s team: Clint Neal, Truett Ray, Jim Townson and Jay Woolard

Third-place Mixed team: Karla Griffith, Jack Griffith, Regina Pawlikowski and Cheryl Thompson

Putting Contest winner: Joe Flynn

Closest to the Curve winners: George Brooks, Clay Jordan, Mitch Kominiarek and Clint Neal

Closest to the Pin on No. 5: Lou Jiannine

Closest to the Pin on No. 9: Dana Hall

Closest to the Pin on No. 12: Derek White

Closest to the Pin on No. 14: Billy Holton

 

CarolinaEast Health System was the title sponsor of this year’s tournament. Platinum sponsors were Bojangles/Tands, the PCC Small Business Center and Andy Vestal of Truist Investment Services Inc. Vestal also sponsored the “Closest of the Pin” prizes.

 

Gold sponsors included: Jim and Michelle Krauss; Gail Johnson; The Pamlico News; Pamlico Quick Lube and Car Wash (David Spencer); Superior Cranes (Dan Daly); and Ward & Smith, P.A.

 

Silver sponsors included: Delamar & Delamar, PLLC; Garland Fulcher Seafood Co. (The Styron Family); Henry and Mary Ann Hale; Hardison Tire & Towing; Lori’s Golf Shoppe (Lori DeSimone); Pamlico Packing Company, Inc.; and Systel Business Equipment.

 

Robinson and Stith Insurance sponsored the putting green, while prize sponsors included Forrest Farm Supply (Chuck and Wanda Forrest), Goose Creek Island Volunteer Fire Department, Iris Hudson, Bob Lyon and Truett Ray.

 


Pamlico SBC to Co-Host Marketing Expert for Webinar, Conference Call

 

 

April 26, 2021

Pamlico Community College’s Small Business Center (SBC) and a consortium of other rural community colleges’ Small Business Centers are offering local entrepreneurs an opportunity to learn some big city marketing techniques and practices right here at home.

 

The SBCs will be hosting a free webinar and follow-up conference call next month with Stephen Traversie, a New Bern native who has built a distinguished career as a marketing executive with experience in several states and countries.

 

The webinar and conference call, titled “Adapting Big City Marketing Tactics for Small Town Success,” is part of the business centers’ “Restoring Rural Business Series.”

 

The free, hour-long webinar is scheduled for Tuesday, May 4, at 11 a.m. The 30-minute “mastermind-style” follow-up conference call is set for Thursday, May 6, at 11 a.m.

 

“These events will be ideal for current and aspiring small business owners who are looking for some great advice about marketing,” said PCC President Dr. Jim Ross. “Pamlico Small Business Center Director Mindy Moore helped arrange for Mr. Traversie’s appearance, and I salute her and all of the other rural Small Business Center directors who are helping business owners come back from the effects of the pandemic.”

 

The “Restoring Rural Business Series” was made possible by a grant from the Rural LISC organization. The goal is to help Small Business Centers in the most rural parts of the state have access to specialized topics and presenters through the remainder of 2021 to assist rural entrepreneurs and businesses adapting and dealing with the impact of pandemic.

 

Todd Lyden, director of the Small Business Center at Bladen Community College, is spearheading the effort.

 

For her part, Moore predicted Traversie, who now lives in New York, would bring fantastic ideas and insights to the webinar and follow-up phone call.

 

“Stephen Traversie is an accomplished marketing executive with experience in many areas,” she said. “We are fortunate to have him join us.”

 

Traversie, of Sēzən Creative, has worked with top ranked retail, nightlife and hospitality brands, including sbe, Hakkasan Group, Tao Group Hospitality, Madison Square Garden and their subsidiaries. He attended UNC Charlotte, where he started his career in marketing and business.

 

Traversie also has appeared on a cable television series.

 

He is expected to discuss “owning your customer” and the implications for different parts of marketing for rural small business owners and entrepreneurs using a 360 approach, organizers say.

 

To pre-register for the webinar, please visit https://bit.ly/AdaptingBigCity. To join the conference call, telephone 712-770-5505 and use access code 824870#.

 

For additional information, please contact Moore at 252-571-2243 or mmoore@pamlicocc.edu.

 


PCC Graduates Begin Careers Close to Home

 

 

April 16, 2021

Two recent Pamlico Community College graduates show that you don’t have to leave the area to find a rewarding career in your chosen field.

 

Both Francisco Arreol-Muro, Class of 2019, and Cecilia “Ceci” Holton, Class of 2020, have launched their careers close to home.

 

By doing so, Arreol-Muro, who lives in Arapahoe, and Holton, who lives in Olympia, have been able to stay close to family members and live in the familiar communities where they have spent their lives.

 

“Francisco and Cecilia demonstrate how area students can find rewarding careers right here at home,” said PCC President Dr. Jim Ross. “By taking advantage of the opportunities available here at the college, these two recent graduates are equipped to take the work world by storm. We are proud of their successes and look forward to following the careers of these outstanding PCC graduates.”

 

Arreol-Muro earned associate’s degrees in Environmental Science Technology and Environmental Management Technology. The college’s versatile Environmental programs also enabled him to secure certificates in Environmental Science Technology Health and Safety, Environmental Management Technology Natural Resource Conservation and Environmental Management Technology Water Resource Management.

 

That combination of academic credentials helped the lifelong Pamlico County resident secure a full-time job as a state safety inspector. Based in an office at the PCC campus, Arreol-Muro conducts inspections and reviews at Eastern North Carolina community colleges for the Environmental Health and Safety Institute, which is based at Blue Ridge Community College in Henderson County.

 

His duties include conducting indoor air quality assessments, mold testing, fume hood testing and other reviews at area campuses.

 

“I didn’t think I’d get this type of job with a two-year degree,” Arreol-Muro said, adding that his role is to spot potential safety violations and give colleges an opportunity to correct them before authorities discover them and issue fines.

 

He credits PCC Environmental programs Instructor Zac Schnell with providing him the skills and knowledge he needs for his job. Arreol-Muro also singled out PCC English Instructor Rick Miller for instilling in him the discipline to be punctual and to document his findings completely and correctly.

 

Arreol-Muro also was one of four PCC students to take part in a month-long Study Abroad trip to the Philippines in 2018, which he said exposed him to real world environmental projects.

 

Most importantly, he said his time at PCC helped him create a network of instructors and friends who have helped him start his career with a great job.

 

“It’s very important to build relationships,” Arreol-Muro said, adding that one of his sisters is a PCC Medical Assisting graduate and another sister is enrolled in the college’s Cosmetology program.

 

Meanwhile, Holton began her career as a full-time stylist at Magnolia Jane Salon in downtown New Bern last summer, just days after graduating with her Cosmetology diploma and certificate.

 

The 19-year-old was able to get a head start on her career by enrolling in the N.C. Career & College Promise (CCP) program while she was a student at Pamlico County High School. The program enables high school students to take tuition-free college-level courses from PCC.

 

Holton began her Cosmetology studies as a high school junior and completed the program last year. Because she took all of her PCC courses through the CCP program while in high school, she did not have to pay college tuition and could begin her full-time, professional career as a teenager.

 

Holton, who grew up in Pamlico County, always had an interest in hairstyling. She received a mannequin head for her 13th birthday and later got a salon-style chair installed in her bedroom.

 

Holton said the PCC program taught her the essentials of styling and gave her some important social skills.

 

“I learned how to interact with people,” she said.

 

After securing the job at Magnolia Jane Studio, Holton has taken some additional training. She is now a Level I stylist at the downtown New Bern studio and is working on building her clientele.

 

Holton has received rave reviews from her colleagues and customers. One online post states, “She has worked super hard to refine and build on her skills, and we have to admit, Ceci was also born with 100% natural talent. She was meant to make the world a beautiful place, one gorgeous head of hair at a time, and we are so proud of her!”

 

For his part, Ross added, “We are proud of both Ceci and Francisco. I encourage prospective students to check out the opportunities we offer right here at Pamlico Community College.”

 


Area Seniors Complete PCC Computer Course

 

 

April 12, 2021

Five senior adults recently completed one of two Basic Computers courses at Pamlico Community College and were awarded certificates.

 

PCC offered the free Basic Computers courses in a socially distant, masked format in collaboration with Agape Love in Action, Inc.

 

Pictured are, from left, Instructor Karen McCarten, Hattie Robinson, Georgiana Wilds, Mary Ollison, Delcine Gibbs, Sharon Meadows and PCC Chair of Continuing Education and Technical Programs Lori Giles.

 

The other class wrapped up earlier this year.

 

For more information about PCC’s Computer/Information Technology courses, please call 252-249-1851, ext. 3015, or lgiles@pamlicocc.edu.


Scholarship Helps CCP Students Reach Goals

 

 

March 15, 2021

High school students who have started their college-level coursework at Pamlico Community College through the N.C. Career and College Promise (CCP) program now are eligible to apply for a $2,000 annual scholarship designed to help recipients complete their degrees, diplomas or certificates.

 

Thanks to a generous, recurring annual grant from the Margaret Rawls Stancil estate through the N.C. Community Foundation, the PCC Foundation has launched the new “Pamlico Proud” scholarship initiative.

 

Applications are now being accepted from current CCP students who plan to continue pursuing their degrees, diplomas or certificates at Pamlico Community College.

 

Applications are due May 13, and the first recipient of the initial $2,000 annual Pamlico Proud scholarship will be announced before the start of the Fall 2021 semester.

 

The maximum award will be $2,000 per academic year, renewable for a second academic year for a total of two years, or four semesters. With $4,000 available each year, two students will be on scholarship each semester after the initial single $2,000 award is made for Fall 2021.

 

“All of us at the college are very excited about the new Pamlico Proud scholarship and the opportunities it will be provide for CCP students to complete their educational goal with little or no out-of-pocket costs,” said PCC President Dr. Jim Ross. “We are very appreciative of the endowment funds from the late Margaret Rawls Stancil estate, managed by the N.C. Foundation, which made this initiative possible. I also congratulate the PCC Foundation for its continued work to ensure local men and women have opportunities to improve their lives through higher education.”

 

PCC Foundation Executive Director Michelle Noevere said the Pamlico Proud scholarship is designed to make it easier for students who start college-level work in high school to secure their degrees, diplomas or certificates, whether it be a university-transfer degree or a hands-on career credential.

 

Noevere, CCP coordinator Derek Godwin and an ad hoc team of faculty members and staffers came together with Foundation board member Carla Byrnes to develop the criteria, amount and term for the new scholarship.

 

“The ad hoc committee was enthusiastic about the idea,” she said. “Committee members felt that offering a generous scholarship that will pay for practically all expenses to obtain up to an associate’s degree gave us the opportunity to make a huge difference one student at a time.”

 

Noevere said focusing on CCP students, who are eligible to take tuition-free courses in high school but who must pay PCC tuition and fees once they graduate, was a natural choice for the new initiative.

 

“Committee members understand the CCP student experience very well, so they were well positioned to offer input on this new program,” she said. “I applaud Derek Godwin and his team’s commitment to ensuring students get the best experience possible out of taking college classes while still in high school. I have witnessed how they get to know each student personally, and oftentimes, their families too. They definitely have the students’ best interests at heart.”

 

To be eligible to apply for the Pamlico Proud scholarship, a student must: be an American citizen; graduate from high school this spring; have completed at least two CCP classes with at least 3.0 GPA; have completed a PCC application in an associate’s degree or diploma program for the fall of this year; have completed a FAFSA form and submitted it to PCC by April 1; and must agree to attend the annual PCC Scholarship Award Banquet.

 

To keep the scholarship, a recipient must: remain in good academic standing at PCC (3.0 GPA or higher); maintain completion rate of 67 percent or higher while a student at PCC; must complete a FAFSA form each year; and must complete at least eight hours of volunteer assistance with college on-campus and community events, including PCC Foundation activities.

 

Prospective applicants are encouraged to contact Derek Godwin at the Bayboro Center for more information, dgodwin@pamlicocc.edu or 252-745-7349. They also can contact their high school counselor or go to http://pamlicocc.edu/admissions-careerpromise.php to access the application.

 

The PCC Foundation’s new Pamlico Proud scholarship builds on the organization’s recent history of helping CCP students achieve their goals. In 2020, the Foundation launched a “book fund” drive as part of its annual campaign to help CCP students purchase the often-expensive textbooks required for their college-level courses.

 

That effort raised $7,000.

 

“While PCC courses are free for high schoolers, they must pay for the books, some of which can cost $300,” Noevere said. “It’s a dealbreaker for some families.”

 

Noevere and committee members, which also include PCC employees Meredith Beeman, Cameron Kishel and Cristy Lewis Warner, hope to grow the Pamlico Proud fund and the book fund through additional gifts, grants and donations.

 

For more information, contact Noevere at 252-249-1851, ext. 3084, or mnoevere@pamlicocc.edu. Checks can be made to PCCF and mailed to P.O. Box 185, Grantsboro NC 28529, and online donations can be made at http://pamlicocc.edu/about-foundation.php.

 

Sandy Wall can be reached at 252-249-1851, ext. 3010, or swall@pamlicocc.edu.


PCC Offers Options for Notary Training

 

 

March 1, 2021

Pamlico Community College’s Continuing Education division features options for men and women who want to sharpen their notary skills or who want to become notaries.

 

Notaries are authorized by the state of North Carolina to screen the signers of important legal documents, including property deeds, car titles, wills and powers of attorney.

 

They ensure the true identities of signers, and they also make sure signers understand the contents of documents and are acting free of coercion or intimidation.

 

PCC will be offering an eNotary, or electronic notarization, course on Saturday, March 13, at the college’s Bayboro Center.

 

The eNotary process involves applying an electronic notary signature and seal in a paperless transaction – a process that can be very useful during the ongoing COVID-19 pandemic.

 

The half-day course is open to current notaries. Students must bring a valid government ID and commission number to class.

 

Hours will be 8:30 a.m. to 12:30 p.m. Cost for the course is $70, plus a $7.50 book.

 

For men and women who want to become notaries, PCC will be offering its traditional monthly Notary course on Saturday, March 27, at the Bayboro Center.

 

This one-day course will provide instruction in legal ethical and procedural requirements of the Notary Act. Individuals who complete the course are eligible to make application to the N.C. Secretary of State.

 

Hours will be 8:30 a.m. to 5 p.m. Cost for the course is $70, plus a $26.65 book.

 

The college also plans to offer the Notary course on May 8.

 

“Our Continuing Education team has been very diligent in offering new courses to meet the evolving needs of our community,” said PCC President Dr. Jim Ross. “At the same time, the team also remains committed to offering traditional courses such as Notary Public that are always in demand.”

 

For more information about the Notary or eNotary courses, please contact Lori Giles, PCC’s chair of Continuing Education and Technical Programs, at 252-249-1851, ext. 3015, or lgiles@pamlicocc.edu.

 


Two Nominated for Top Student Awards

 

 

February 18, 2021

Annemarie Brown of Jacksonville and Clifford Harris of Vanceboro are the two nominees for Pamlico Community College’s 2020-21 Academic Excellence Award/Student of the Year!

 

PCC Vice President of Student Services Jamie D. Gibbs announced the nominees’ names last week.

 

Brown is enrolled in the college’s Environmental Management Technology program and was nominated by her advisor, Zachary Schnell.

 

Harris is enrolled in the PCC Welding program and was nominated by his advisor, Joe Flynn.

 

“Both of these students are outstanding nominees,” said PCC President Dr. Jim Ross. “They have worked hard in their respective programs and have impressed their instructors and advisors. All of us at the college wish them well as they move forward in the process.”

 

To be nominated, a student must meet the following criteria:

 

* Must be currently enrolled,

* Must be eligible to earn a diploma or an associate’s degree during the 2021 graduation ceremony, and

* Must have a cumulative grade point average of not less than 3.5.

 

The recipient of the award will be announced at PCC’s 2021 Commencement Exercises later this year. He or she also will receive a plaque, a medallion, a letter of congratulations and a $300 check. Additionally, the student’s photo and success story will be featured on the System Office’s “Great Within the 58” webpage.

 

“The nominations of a student in our Environmental Management student and a student in our Welding program shows the breadth of opportunities available at Pamlico Community College,” Ross said. “All of us at PCC congratulate Annemarie and Clifford on their success.”

 

The 2019-20 recipient of the PCC Academic Excellence Award/Student of the Year honor was Samantha D. Armstrong-Plumley of Grantsboro.


PCC Medical Assisting Program Leads to Jobs

 

 

February 15, 2021

The market demand for health care professionals already was strong, even before the onset of the COVID-19 pandemic.

 

Pamlico Community College’s Medical Assisting program is designed to meet the ever-growing need for front-line health care workers by preparing men and women to be multi-skilled health care pros who are qualified to perform administrative, clinical and laboratory procedures in a variety of health care settings.

 

“Health care is a growing segment of our region’s economy, and the demand for medical assistants is continually on the rise in primary care facilities,” said PCC President Dr. Jim Ross. “Pamlico Community College is working to meet that need. Graduates of our college’s Medical Assisting program have gone on to rewarding careers helping residents of our community. We are very proud of our program and the positive impact it has had on Pamlico County and Eastern North Carolina.”

 

The Medical Assisting program, which is headquartered at the college’s Grantsboro campus, offers a two-year Associate of Applied Science degree option and a three-semester Diploma option.

 

Upon successful completion of the program, students are eligible to take the CMA (AAMA) exam to become nationally certified in the field. This certification is essential for medical assistants seeking employment.

 

Job opportunities are numerous, with employment of medical assistants nationally projected to grow “much faster than the average of all occupations” between now and 2029 as the health care sector expands to meet the needs of a growing and aging population, according to the U.S. Bureau of Labor Statistics.

 

PCC’s program coursework, which includes anatomy & physiology, medical terminology and other classes, is rigorous, but PCC’s small class size and caring faculty help to make it manageable. The program also includes hands-on learning opportunities and clinical work off campus.

 

“If you have a love for the medical field and the desire to make a difference in the lives of others, becoming a medical assistant is the perfect career for you,” PCC Medical Assisting Instructor Tina Hardison, a 2015 program graduate, said in a previous interview. “The joys that I personally experienced practicing as a medical assistant coming to the aid of others has been extremely rewarding and life altering.”

 

For more information about PCC’s Medical Assisting program, please contact Hardison at 252-249-1851, ext. 3044, or thardison@pamlicocc.edu.


PCC President Dr. Jim Ross’s Son Dies After Battle with ALS

 

 

February 8, 2021

Dr. Robert James “Bobby” Ross, MD, PhD, son of Pamlico Community College President Dr. Jim Ross and his wife, Mrs. Pam Ross, died Monday, Jan. 18, 2021, at his parents’ home after a courageous six-year battle with Amyotrophic Lateral Sclerosis, or ALS. He was 38.

 

Dr. Bobby Ross passed away peacefully with his parents in prayer by his side. He had most recently lived in New Haven, Conn., before moving eight months ago to be with his parents and extended family in North Carolina.

 

Dr. Bobby Ross earned his MD with honors in 2016 at Yale University after earning his PhD with honors in 2014 from Yale. He was one of 10 students from around the world selected by Yale in 2006 to receive a full-tuition scholarship based on merit to earn both the MD and PhD degrees over an eight-year period. After earning both degrees, he was a resident physician in psychiatry at Yale until 2019 when the effects of ALS prevented him from continuing the work he loved so much. He specialized in serving military veterans during his service as a physician at Yale.

 

In his final months, Dr. Bobby Ross was able only to move his eyes, but his mind was as alert as ever. Through an assistive device that allowed him to communicate using eye movement, the younger Dr. Ross was able to engage in many deep conversations with his father, his mother, and others on many topics, including medicine, politics, higher education, sports, and his faith.

 

“The fact that Bobby contracted ALS, suffered tremendously from it, and died from it should not overshadow the unique brightness of his overall life,” said his father. “Bobby had a life filled with astonishing achievements, great overall happiness, and abundant joy he spread wherever he went.  Most importantly, wherever he went and whatever he did, he made lives better.”

 

“As his father, I saw Bobby develop a deep faith and I believe that the most important essence of Bobby that brought such an incredible legacy of making lives better is that he consistently followed the teachings of Jesus Christ in caring more about others rather than himself. I saw this consistently as he worked to help others throughout his life and the good this brought about.”

 

“When Bobby earned his PhD from Yale, I was so proud for his academic achievements but something else made me just as proud,” said his father. “Nearly every fellow student in his lab came up to me that day and revealed how Bobby had voluntarily helped them when they desperately needed academic help, encouragement, and friendship. Several said they might not have made it that far, or even dropped out, without Bobby’s help for them.”

 

“When Bobby earned his MD, Pam and I were so proud that he bravely did so while fighting the effects of ALS. After he then became a Yale resident physician in psychiatry, we were so proud of the love he showed and care he provided military veterans, which he specialized in. He did so as the horrible disease continued to profoundly devastate all his physical capabilities. Bobby earned a prestigious Yale award that year for outstanding clinical care of patients because of his inspired, loving, and effective work with veterans.”

 

Dr. Jim Ross praised his wife Pam, who led the caregiving efforts for Bobby right up until the end. “Pam was like an angel on earth as she displayed amazing strength, courage, and love for our beloved son throughout Bobby’s battle for life.”   

 

Because the younger Dr. Ross spent most of his adult life in Connecticut, there will not be any local viewing, funeral service or receiving of friends. The family requests no flowers or gifts, but welcomes emails to jross@pamlicocc.edu and greeting cards, which can be sent to the family via the college’s address, P.O. Box 185, Grantsboro, NC 28529.

 

Dr. and Mrs. Jim Ross wish to thank from the bottom of their hearts everyone in Pamlico County and elsewhere for their prayers on behalf of their son and their entire family, which they credit with giving them strength and comfort throughout the horrific medical ordeal their son Bobby went through.

 


Short-Term Training Courses Now Available

 

 

February 17, 2021

Pamlico Community College’s Continuing Education division has announced a new slate of short-term training courses designed to help men and women learn the essential skills for a new career or to become more valuable at their current jobs.

 

Subject areas include health care, business and hands-on workplace skills.

 

In most cases, classes will meet in a face-to-face format at the college’s Grantsboro campus.

 

The upcoming PCC offerings will include:

 

* Cardiac Monitor Technician course, which will begin Tuesday, Feb. 23.

 

* Medication Aide course, a three-day class that will start Thursday, Feb. 25.

 

* Forklift Training, a one-day course set for Saturday, Feb. 27.

 

* A new section of the popular Nurse Aide I course, which will begin in March. Dates TBA

 

* A daytime section of the Nurse Aide II course, which will start Tuesday, March 2.

 

 * Physical Therapy Aide course, which is scheduled to start Tuesday, March 2.

 

* E-Notary Public course, a half-day class that will meet Saturday, March 13, at the

   college’s Bayboro Center.

 

* Microsoft Excel course, which will begin Monday, March 22.

 

* Notary Public course, a one-day class that will meet Saturday, March 27, at the

   college’s Bayboro Center.

 

Also launching soon will be new courses in Medical Coding and Pharmacy Technician. Dates are TBA.

 

For more information about these courses, please contact Lori Giles at 252-249-1851, ext. 3015, or lgiles@pamlicoccedu.

 

 


Sign Up Now for PCC’s Health Care Courses

 

 

January 19, 2021

Pamlico Community College offers short-term training courses that can lead to great jobs in the fast-growing health care sector!

 

Classes are forming now. Among the upcoming face-to-face courses are:

 

* Nurse Aide I

M/W, Jan. 25 to May 26

5:30 to 9:30 p.m.

 

* Physical Therapy Aide

T/Th, Jan. 26 to May 6

8:30 a.m. – 1:30 p.m.

 

* Medication Aide

Jan. 29, 30 and Feb. 5

8:30 a.m. to 4:30 p.m.

 

* Nurse Aide I

M/W, Feb. 8 to April 28

8:30 a.m. to 4:30 p.m.

 

* Cardiac Monitor Training

T/Th, Feb. 9 to May 13

Noon to 4 p.m.

 

* Nurse Aide II (day)

T/Th, Feb. 9 to April 22

8:30 a.m. to 4 p.m.

 

* Nurse Aide II (evening)

T/Th, Feb. 16 to May 13

5 to 9 p.m.

 

Now is a great time to contact the college to reserve your seat for these Continuing Education offerings!

 

For more information, please contact the college at 252-249-1851, ext. 3015, or lgiles@pamlicocc.ed

2020

Spring Course Schedule Now Available Online

 

 

December 14, 2020

Pamlico Community College’s 24-page Spring 2021 Course Schedule booklet, which is full of great learning opportunities for the new year, is available here.

 


Give the Gift of a College Education!

 

 

December 7, 2020

The Pamlico Community College Foundation has launched its annual fund drive, which supports scholarships for deserving students.

 

The fund drive comes as the nation enters a season of giving, which organizers hope will help encourage gifts to the Foundation.

 

“These are extraordinary times, but as I often say, better days are on the way,” said PCC President Dr. Jim Ross. “There is no better way to be prepared for the good days ahead than to secure a high-quality education. That’s what we offer at Pamlico Community College, and our Foundation works hard to make that education as accessible as possible.”

 

Ross and PCC Foundation Executive Director Michelle Noevere said the COVID-19 pandemic has hindered the Foundation’s ability to conduct its usual fundraising activities this year.

 

“Our students are your neighbors,” Noevere said. “They come from all walks of life. They might be recent high school graduates or they might be adult learners working and supporting families. They are your future health care professionals, first responders, business leaders, welders, environmental scientists and more.”

 

She continued, “The unprecedented circumstances caused by the pandemic have negatively impacted our typical fundraising events. At the same time, many of our students have been laid off or had hours cut back. The community’s support is more vital now than ever.”

 

The Foundation was able to host its annual Oyster Revival and Chili Cookoff in February before the pandemic took hold, and it put on a scaled-down, socially distant golf tournament in October. However, other events have been put on hold.

 

Even a small donation has impact. Curriculum tuition is $76 per semester hour, while registration fees for certified nursing assistant, phlebotomy technician or cardiac monitor technician are $180 per course.

 

Twenty-five or $50 goes a long way towards helping with a book purchase for a Career and College Promise student. (Career and College Promise is a program that enables high school students to take tuition-free college course, but they might purchase their books.)

 

Students who enroll at PCC can expect to receive a great education. Earlier this year, WalletHub ranked Pamlico as the No. 1 community college in the United States for students’ Education Outcomes, based on U.S. Department of Education data and other sources. The college also has been designated North Carolina’s best two-year college for online education by Affordable Colleges Online.

 

The college features small class sizes so students can get more personalized attention, and the faculty and staff genuinely want to see students succeed.

 

“I want to thank our donors who have made a gift already,” Noevere said. “Your support, helping to bring a college education or trade skill within reach of more students, is an investment in your community and your neighbors’ futures. Please act now, so that we may have funds in place next month for Spring semester scholarships.”

 

To learn more about the Foundation, or to designate your tax-deductible donation, please visit http://www.pamlicocc.edu/about-foundation.php or call Noevere at 252-249-1851, ext. 3084.

 


Schnell, PCC Programs Featured in Article

 

 

December 7, 2020

For most people, 2020 has been a drag. However, for Pamlico Community College Instructor Zac Schnell, this year actually has been pretty great, at least professionally.

 

The 31-year-old Wilmington native recently was featured in an EducationNC (EdNC) article. The story, written by EdNC’s Molly Osborne, highlighted Schnell and the college’s Environmental Science Technology and Environmental Management Technology programs that he leads.

 

It also spotlighted the four-week Study Abroad trip to the Philippines that Schnell organized in 2018.

 

Earlier this year, the gregarious Schnell was named the college’s 2020 Instructor of the Year, and he also began assisting with OSHA training for Continuing Education students.

 

Schnell also continues in his role as the college’s chair of General Studies, and, in the recent past, he has been a key organizer of the college’s STEM-themed summer day camp for middle schoolers.

 

“Zac Schnell is a true leader on our campus,” said PCC President Dr. Jim Ross. “The Environmental programs he oversees at PCC are among only a handful of similar programs in the state. He also has grown in his role as the college’s chair of General Studies.”

 

Ross continued, “Most importantly, Zac brings a dedication to seeing PCC students succeed. He is a fun, enthusiastic and knowledgeable instructor who puts the interests of his students first. We are fortunate to have him at PCC. He brings passion and dedication to all of his campus roles.”

 

For his part, Schnell has been modest about the attention. After he was named PCC’s Instructor of the Year, he said, “I greatly appreciate this honor. This means a lot to me, and I am happy to help however I can.”

 

Schnell grew up in coastal North Carolina and earned his bachelor’s and master’s degrees from N.C. State University. He spent two years in the Peace Corps, working on coastal management projects in the Philippines.

 

The contacts he developed there were critical to his effort to organize the 2018 Study Abroad trip for PCC students.

 

Schnell also worked for a while at the Great Smoky Mountains National Park Institute at Tremont before joining the PCC faculty in 2016.

 

At PCC, Schnell and his students can often be found in the field, collecting water and soil samples, examining the effects of pollution or touring municipal facilities.

 

“As I’ve said before, all of us are very fortunate to live in such a beautiful place,” Ross said. “It’s only appropriate that Pamlico Community College offers programs to train men and women to understand, protect and enhance the environment.”

 

The president continued, “Environmental Science Technology and Environmental Management Technology are two of the programs that set Pamlico Community College apart from its peers. We are proud to offer these programs, and we are fortunate to have an innovative, well-educated and well-liked instructor to lead them.”

 

For more information about PCC’s Environmental programs, contact Zac Schnell at zschnell@pamlicocc.edu or call 252-249-1851, ext. 3115.

 

A link to the EdNC story can be found here: https://www.ednc.org/pamlico-community-college-instructor-passion-outdoors-career-environmental-science/?fbclid=IwAR0kaDpdv2jAWHiZ_AWwjTR7Vz79miRpc3OChB41XN9P3n9cFeC_swRS6nI

 


Spring Registration Now Underway at PCC

 

 

November 17, 2020

Why wait until January? Registration for the Spring 2021 semester at Pamlico Community College is underway now!

 

The registration period formally opened Monday, Nov. 16. College officials are encouraging new and returning students to go ahead and register for the new semester before the winter break in December.

 

PCC still will conduct its usual Spring Registration period on Jan. 6 and 7, 2021, but students can avoid the new year’s rush and get their face-to-face and online courses locked in now.

 

“We work hard to make registration as easy as possible for current students as well as for those who want to join us in the Spring,” said PCC President Dr. Jim Ross. “By registering early, new and returning PCC students can ensure they get the courses they need and can avoid the busy registration period in January.”

 

Students who decide to enroll at PCC can expect to receive a high-quality education. WalletHub recently ranked Pamlico as the No. 1 in the United States for students’ Education Outcomes. The college also has been designated North Carolina’s best two-year college for online education by Affordable Colleges Online.

 

The college features small class sizes so students can get more personalized attention.

 

PCC Vice President of Student Services Jamie Gibbs said college staffers would be reaching out to current students soon to suggest they work with their program advisors on their Spring 2021 course schedules.

 

Meanwhile, new students who are interested in beginning their academic journeys in the Spring are encouraged to contact the college’s Student Services staff so they can get the application and financial aid processes started, he said.

 

“We are here to help men and women get started on improving their lives,” Gibbs said. “Now is a great time for new students to explore financial aid options and to look into the program areas that interest them.”

 

Ross expressed optimism about the new semester and the new year.

 

“Better days are ahead, and the best way to be prepared for them is to have the education you need,” Ross said. “I thank the faculty and staff of PCC for making our college the No. 1 community college in America for students’ Educational Outcomes and encourage Pamlico County citizens to make their lives better by taking classes here.”

 

For more information about the Spring 2020 registration period, contact PCC at 252-249-1851, ext. 3001, or studentservices@pamlicocc.edu.

 


Continuing Education Plans Busy November

 

 

November 2, 2020

Pamlico Community College’s Continuing Education division is starting the new month strong with a mix of familiar courses and new offerings to help men and women develop new skills for the workplace.

 

The courses will feature face-to-face instruction, while one of them will be offered in a hybrid (part-seated, part-online) format.

 

“Our Continuing Education division does a great job tailoring its course offerings to the needs of local employers and employees,” said PCC President Dr. Jim Ross. “The college is always looking for new opportunities to bring skills-based training to PCC so we can prepare men and women for new jobs or to help them become more valuable at their current jobs.”

 

In that spirit, PCC will be offering an Introduction to Computer-Aided Design and 3-D Printing course on Thursdays beginning Nov. 12. The class, which will be taught by Welding Instructor Joe Flynn, will include face-to-face instruction as well as some web-based training.

 

PCC will offer the next edition of its popular Nurse Aide II course beginning Tuesday, Nov. 17. The class will meet on campus Tuesdays and Thursdays from 5 to 9 p.m.

 

The college’s next one-day Forklift Training course is set for Saturday, Nov. 21, on campus. Also that day, PCC will offer its one-day Notary course in Bayboro.

 

Looking ahead, December will feature two opportunities for food service workers to participate in ServSafe training. There will be a one-day course on Monday, Dec. 7, and a full training course Dec. 14 to 17.

 

Finally, the college is forming new Basic Skills classes for men and women who need to earn their high school equivalency or who need to learn to speak English. All Basic Skills courses are offered free of charge.

 

“We work hard to schedule courses and programs that will meet the training needs of our community,” said Lori Giles, PCC’s chair of Continuing Education and Technical Programs. “I encourage everyone to check out our offerings and see how we can help you improve your job prospects and your life.”

 

For more information about these and other Continuing Education courses, please contact the college at 252-249-1851, ext. 3015, or lgiles@pamlicocc.edu.

 


‘Crafty’ Local Woman Learns to Weld at PCC

 

 

October 26, 2020

April Thompson of Pamlico County says she enjoys making crafts and artistic pieces out of wood and other materials, but always wanted to work with metal so her work would be more durable.

 

To create the pieces she’d seen and imagined, Thompson, who lives near the Neuse River waterfront along Janiero Road, would need to learn how to weld.

 

The solution? She enrolled in a short-term Welding course offered by Pamlico Community College, where she learned the skills she needed to create impressive pieces for display outdoors – pieces such as her head-turning, sailboat-themed whirligig.

 

“I saw one and thought: ‘That would be cool, I could make that,’” Thompson said, adding that wooden whirligigs and similar items simply don’t hold up when exposed to the elements. “I like to do all kinds of crafts and everything. I just think sailboats are pretty.”

 

Working with PCC Welding Instructor Joe Flynn, Thompson found an image of sailboat that she liked. Flynn scanned the picture, and then the two used the college’s plasma cutter to cut four matching sailboats from the image out of metal.

 

Thompson pulled a hub from an unused bicycle to use for the center of the piece, and then welded the boats and their supports to create the whirligig. After some painting, the piece was ready to install at her home.

 

“Our college’s Continuing Education division features versatile course offerings that are designed to meet the needs of our community,” said PCC President Dr. Jim Ross. “These courses can prepare men and women for new careers, they can provide people with new skills so they can be more valuable at their current jobs or, as in the case of April Thompson, they can teach someone a new skill that interests them.”

 

Thompson, who works at the Oriental Marina & Inn, discovered she loved to weld and is pretty good at it. She said she looked forward to coming to campus to continue working on her newfound skill.

 

“I’m bolting out of work at 4 o’clock so I can go to class,” she said with a chuckle. “I like it. It makes me happy when I get my line right. It opens up my options to a whole lot more opportunities.”

 

Thompson also said Flynn was a patient instructor who wanted to see his students succeed. She said she plans to enroll in future Welding courses at the college and would be encouraging her husband and friends to join her.

 

For more information about the college’s Continuing Education course offerings, please contact Lori Giles at 252-249-1851, ext. 3015, or lgiles@pamlicocc.edu. For more information about PCC’s curriculum and Continuing Education offerings in Welding, please contact Joe Flynn at 252-249-1851, ext. 3058, or jflynn@pamlicocc.edu.

 


Golfers Raise Money for PCC Foundation

 

Winning Golf Team

 

October 22, 2020

More than 30 golfers hit the links Saturday to raise scholarship funds at the Pamlico Community College Foundation’s 20th Annual CarolinaEast Cup Golf Tournament at Minnesott Yacht, Golf & Country Club.

 

The weather was cool, breezy and sunny, and the golfers’ scores were very good at the popular event, which was rescheduled from May because of the ongoing COVID-19 pandemic.

 

Most importantly, the Foundation’s tournament raised roughly $8,000 for student scholarships and other college priorities.

 

“We had an excellent day, with lots of fun and fellowship, all for a great cause,” said PCC President Dr. Jim Ross. “Because of the pandemic, we weren’t certain we would be able to have the tournament this year, but Foundation Executive Director Michelle Noevere and her team persevered and organized a fantastic event. We thank everyone who came out for the event, and we appreciate all of the sponsors who gave generously this year.”

 

Eight teams played the 18 holes at the Minnesott Beach course. As always, prizes went to the first-, second- and third-place men’s teams and the top-placing mixed teams.

 

This year’s tournament also featured prizes for golfers who hit closest to the pin on holes 5, 9, 12 and 14, a prize for the player who hit closest to the curve on another hole, and a putting contest back at the clubhouse.

 

A 50-50 raffle and a hearty takeout lunch of steak sandwiches and baked potatoes completed the day.

 

To keep the tourney as safe as possible, golfers and other participants wore masks and practiced social distancing. Tee times were staggered to keep teams separated on the course, and the awards ceremony took place outdoors rather than inside the clubhouse.

 

Several PCC students were on hand to assist with the tournament and to remind golfers and others of the reason for the event.

 

“Scholarships make such a difference in the lives of many Pamlico Community College students,” Noevere said. “These funds enable men and women to reach their educational goals and improve their lives. All of us with the Foundation are thankful that we live in such a generous community.”

 

Indeed, generosity prevailed at the tourney. Duncan Harrison, who won the 50-50 raffle, donated his $97.50 share back to the Foundation. Mitch Kominiarek, who won one of the Closest to the Pin contests, donated his $125 prize to the Foundation, as well.

 

This year’s winners included:

 

First-place men’s team: Louis Godwin, Billy Holton, Mitch Kominiarek and Barry Mills

First-place mixed team: Nick Harrell, C.H. Styron, Cheryl Thompson and Jay Woodard

Second-place men’s team: Larry Boehme, Martin Guion, Duncan Harrison and Mike Rideout

Second-placed mixed team: David Corriher, Barbara Gould, Rex Horne and Ron Scotti

Third-place men’s team: Will Harper, Jim Krauss, Phillip Nanney and Matt Scott

Putting Contest winner: Duncan Harrison

Closest to the Curve winner: Barbara Gould

Closest to the Pin on No. 5: Mitch Kominiarek

Closest to the Pin on No. 9: C.H. Styron

Closest to the Pin on No. 12: Louis Godwin

Closest to the Pin on No. 14: Jim Townson

 

CarolinaEast Health System was the title sponsor of this year’s tournament. Platinum sponsors were the PCC Small Business Center and BB&T Scott & Stringfellow (Financial advisor Andy Vestal). Andy Vestal of BB&T Scott & Stringfellow also sponsored the “Closest of the Pin” prizes.

 

Gold sponsors included: Bojangles’; Gail Johnson; Edward Jones (Dan Roberts IV, AAMS); Jim and Michelle Krauss; The Pamlico News; Pamlico Quick Lube and Car Wash (David Spencer); Superior Cranes (Dan Daly); and Ward & Smith, P.A.

 

Silver sponsors included: Delamar & Delamar, PLLC; Garland Fulcher Seafood Co. (The Styron Family); Henry and Mary Ann Hale; Hardison Tire & Towing; Lori’s Golf Shoppe (Lori DeSimone); Sam Myers and Mary Helen Boone; Pamlico Packing Company, Inc.; Systel Business Equipment; and Tideland EMC.

 

Hole and Prize sponsors were: NAPA – Pamlico Auto Parts (Robbie Sadler); Forrest Farm Supply (Chuck and Wanda Forrest); John Barlow; Wyatt Cutler; Barbara Gould; and Truett Ray.

 

“We are very grateful to everyone who supported the golf tournament, but the need for additional scholarship dollars remains,” Ross said. “I encourage anyone interested in helping PCC students meet their financial aid needs to contact Michelle Noevere at 252-249-1851, ext. 3084, or by email at mnoevere@pamlicocc.edu. Also, current and prospective students are encouraged to apply for scholarships. Please contact Vice President of Student Services Jamie Gibbs at 252-249-1851, ext. 3021, or by email at studentservices@pamlicocc.edu for more information.”

 


PCC Urges Students to Complete the FAFSA

 

 

October 5, 2020

Pamlico Community College is participating in a statewide effort called NC Countdown to College to get new and returning students to complete their FAFSA forms for the 2021-22 academic year as soon as possible.

 

The FAFSA, or Free Application for Federal Student Aid, is used by colleges and universities to determine a student’s eligibility for financial aid. Many institutions, including PCC, also use a student’s FAFSA form to determine eligibility for scholarships.

 

“Completing the FAFSA form is a critical step for college-bound men and women,” said PCC President Dr. Jim Ross. “The form helps to determine a student’s out-of-pocket costs for college. It also determines the amount and type of financial aid for students. Thankfully, resources are available to help students pay for college, but they need to have completed FAFSA forms to get the financial aid process started.”

 

In the past, high schools and colleges have hosted “FAFSA Day” events to help incoming college students and their parents prepare the forms. Because of the ongoing COVID-19 pandemic, those efforts have moved online, with the College Foundation of North Carolina stepping up to host a series of web-based information sessions.

 

The online meetings, which also will include information about the Residency Determination Service (RDS), are scheduled for:

 

* Monday, Oct. 12, from 4 to 6 p.m.

* Tuesday, Oct. 13, from 9 to 11 a.m.

* Wednesday, Oct. 14, from 4 to 6 p.m.

* Thursday, Oct. 15, from 11 a.m. to 1 p.m.

 

Students and their parents will need to have their 2019 tax information available to complete the FAFSA.

 

For more information about these sessions, contact the College Foundation of North Carolina at 1-866-866-CFNC or on the web at cfnc.org.

 

In addition to the four FAFSA/RDS sessions, the College Foundation of North Carolina has scheduled two online sessions titled “Financial Aid 101” to help new students learn the terminology of financial aid. The sessions will feature financial aid administrators, who will be available to answer questions via live chats.

 

The sessions are set for Tuesday, Oct. 27, from 9 to 11 a.m. and Wednesday, Oct. 28, from 4 to 6 p.m.

 

For more information about these sessions, contact the College Foundation of North Carolina at 1-866-866-CFNC or on the web at cfnc.org.

 

PCC Financial Aid Director Meredith Beeman can help answer students’ questions about the FAFSA and the financial aid process. She can be reached at 252-249-1851, ext. 3026, or  mbeeman@pamlicocc.edu.

 


PCC Welding Graduate Joins College Faculty

 

 

September 21, 2020

One of Pamlico Community College’s trailblazing students is back on campus – this time to teach.

 

Class of 2019 member Jimmy Silver, who was the first Welding Technology graduate from Pamlico to participate in East Carolina University’s Bachelor of Science in Industrial Technology (BSIT) Transfer Program, joined the PCC faculty this semester.

 

The hard-working 25-year-old is teaching Welding full time at the college while also studying for his bachelor’s degree at ECU.

 

“It’s a lot to do,” Silver said with a chuckle. “It’s a workload.”

 

Despite the long hours working at one institution and studying for his four-year degree at another, he said he’s enjoying himself and is glad to be back at the Grantsboro campus.

 

“I just really love the atmosphere here,” Silver said. “When I heard there was an opening, I just jumped on it.”

 

PCC President Dr. Jim Ross said the college was happy Silver decided to return and help the college’s growing Welding Technology program. The program offers both curriculum courses and short-term Continuing Education classes.

 

“All of us at Pamlico Community College love to see our graduates return and join our team,” he said.

 

“Jimmy Silver was an outstanding student here. Not only was he the first person from our Welding program to take advantage of ECU’s Bachelor of Science in Industrial Technology Transfer Program, he became a meticulous and skilled welder. He brings a lot to our program.”

 

Welding Technology is one of PCC’s fastest growing curriculum programs. Over the last four years, the program has increased in enrollment from two students in 2016 to nearly 30 now.

 

Welding can be a rewarding career field. According to the U.S. Bureau of Labor Statistics, the median salary for welders in 2019 was $42,490. Some experienced welders earn much more.

 

The job outlook is strong nationally, with growth in the field projected between 3 and 6 percent over the next 10 years, federal statistics show. There also are many good-paying jobs available in North Carolina.

 

Silver’s personal story shows how community colleges can help men and women find what they love to do.

 

He graduated in 2013 from Parrott Academy in Kinston. Following time in the Navy and a stint selling cars, he went to work at a Jones County hog farm. It was there that he learned to fabricate and repair metal fencing.

 

He also tried his hand at welding at a neighboring community college and found he was very good at it.

 

“It came very naturally to me,” Silver said.

 

PCC Welding Instructor Joe Flynn, who knew Silver, suggested he give Pamlico a look. He decided to enroll in PCC’s Welding Technology AAS program, where he thrived. Not only did Silver earn his associate’s degree, he was accepted by ECU for its innovative transfer program.

 

Silver acknowledged the transition from student to instructor was a little intimidating at first.

 

“It was somewhat nerve-racking,” he said, adding that he wondered what students would think of him.

 

However, it wasn’t long before Silver gained confidence and became comfortable as an instructor. He said he has a good command of the material, has a good group of students and enjoys a very positive relationship with instructor-turned-boss Flynn, who still teaches in the program.

 

“I don’t think it’s been a hard transition at all,” Silver said. “I know what Joe expects from his students and I know what he expects from me. I would never want to let him down.”

 

He plans to complete his ECU degree in the next two years and hopes to remain at PCC.

 

“I don’t plan on running off anytime soon,” he said.

 

For more information about PCC’s Welding Technology program, contact Joe Flynn at 252-249-1851, ext. 3058.

 


College’s Top Student Overcame Setback

 

 

September 14, 2020

Sometimes a change of plans can lead to something great.

 

After being injured at Marine Corps boot camp after high school, Samantha D. Armstrong-Plumley returned to Grantsboro in late 2018 and decided to enroll for the Spring 2019 semester at Pamlico Community College.

 

The decision turned out to be the right one for the 20-year-old Pamlico County native. Through hard work and willpower, Armstrong-Plumley excelled at the college and discovered a new love for science and math along the way.

 

After taking full course loads each semester, including during the summer term, Armstrong-Plumley caught up with her peer group and graduated with her Associate in Science degree this past July as if she had enrolled at the college right out of high school.

 

At Commencement, the high-achiever was honored as the college’s 2020 Academic Excellence Award recipient and was named the college’s Student of the Year. As the recipient of the Academic Excellence Award, Armstrong-Plumley is the college’s 2020 honoree on the N.C. Community College System’s “Great within the 58” list of high-achieving students.

 

Armstrong-Plumley now lives in Sneads Ferry and is studying biology at the University of North Carolina at Wilmington, where she is a junior and a full-time student. Her husband, Michael Plumley, is a Marine at nearby Camp Lejeune.

 

“I was very grateful to be able to start and finish at Pamlico,” Armstrong-Plumley said in a recent telephone interview. “I think it was a good transition, going from a community college to a university. I’m not struggling as much as I would if I had enrolled at a university straight out of high school, and I saved a lot of money.”

 

PCC President Dr. Jim Ross said Armstrong-Plumley’s experiences show the high level of opportunities available at the college.

 

“Samantha Armstrong-Plumley is just one example of how Pamlico Community College can help men and women find new pathways and new options for their futures,” he said. “After her initial plan did not work out, she regrouped and enrolled at the college, where she worked very hard and excelled. Now she’s on her way toward earning a bachelor’s degree, which will open lots of doors for her. We are very proud of her success.”

 

When she was a student at Pamlico County High School, Armstrong-Plumley did not have any particular love for math and science. She credits PCC instructors Cameron Kishel (math), Zac Schnell (environmental science) and Dr. Garnett Whitehurst (biology and chemistry) with helping her discover an affinity for the sciences.

 

“That changed when I started taking classes at Pamlico,” she said, adding that she initially planned to study something like economics in college. “Now I love science. I love math. I love all the STEM-related fields, wherever that takes me.”

 

At PCC, Armstrong-Plumley took both online and seated courses. Her work ethic and ability to stay focused regardless of the course format has served her well at UNCW, which is operating primarily with an online course format amid the COVID-19 pandemic.

 

Armstrong-Plumley earned the respect of her PCC instructors. In a recent letter of recommendation, Kishel called Armstrong-Plumley “one of the most hardworking students I have encountered in my 15-plus years at the community college level.”

 

Kishel continued, “She has consistently maintained a 4.0 GPA from the time she was enrolled as a high school student in our College Transfer Pathway program to the present. In class, not only is Samantha the first to participate, she is also the first to help her peers. Samantha is a model student and I am confident she will be successful as she follows through with her academic pursuits.”

 

Armstrong-Plumley expects to graduate from UNCW in 2022.

 

“Beyond that, the sky is the limit for her,” Ross said. “All of us at the college expect to hear great things about her for years to come.”

 


PCC Ranked No. 1 in America for Educational Outcomes by WalletHub

 

 

August 26, 2020

Pamlico Community College has added in a big way to its growing national reputation for excellence.

 

PCC has earned numerous awards during the past three years as one of America’s best community colleges based on data from the U.S. Department of Education and other national sources. Most recently, PCC has been rated America’s No. 1 community college in Educational Outcomes for students. This national honor utilizes an analysis of nearly 700 two-year institutions across America conducted by WalletHub, an online personal finance and credit evaluation company.

 

The WalletHub analysis was published Aug. 17 in an online article titled “2020’s Best & Worst Community Colleges.” The study used data from the U.S. Department of Education, the Education Department’s National Center for Education Statistics, the non-profit Campaign for Free College Tuition and the membership organization Council for Community & Economic Research to determine its rankings.

 

“Pamlico Community College in North Carolina was best in Education Outcomes, which scored colleges based on areas such as first-year retention rate, graduation rate, student-faculty ratio and special learning opportunities,” stated an Aug. 18 UniversityBusiness.com article about the WalletHub study.

 

PCC President Dr. Jim Ross welcomed news of Pamlico’s No. 1 national ranking for Educational Outcomes by praising PCC employees who “work with extraordinary dedication and teamwork to help students overcome challenges and succeed so they can improve their lives and the lives of their families.”

 

“Credit for this ranking, like every other state and national recognition PCC has received in recent years, belongs to the entire outstanding team of faculty and staff members at the college,” he said. “They care deeply about our students and because of this have responded very positively to our ambitious goals for every employee to continually become better so we can help our students successfully complete their educational goals so they can move forward and achieve success in life. I am very proud of all of our employees for making so many lives better.”

 

According to the methodology it posted online, WalletHub determined its Educational Outcomes rankings by scoring each college on these factors: first-year retention rate; graduation rate; transfer-out rate; degree and certificates awarded per 100 full-time-equivalent students; student-faculty ratio; share of full-time faculty; presence of special learning opportunities such as dual enrollment or distance education programs; and credit for life experiences.

 

“All of us at PCC provide humble appreciation that our college is ranked best in the United States for Educational Outcomes based on WalletHub’s evaluation of critical, student-focused performance results,” Ross said.

 

In addition to Educational Outcomes for students, WalletHub also ranked community colleges on Cost and Financing as well as Career Outcomes. WalletHub scored Imperial Valley College of California as No. 1 in Cost and Financing and Nebraska College of Technical Agriculture as its No. 1 ranked institution in Career Outcomes.

 

The recognition by WalletHub comes just weeks after Affordable Colleges Online ranked PCC as North Carolina’s top two-year college in providing online instruction.

 


Top Employees Honored at Online Ceremony

 

 

August 17, 2020

Pamlico Community College honored its most outstanding employees of the 2019-20 academic year at the institution’s first-ever online awards ceremony last week.

 

The college’s annual employee awards, including Instructor of the Year, Staff Member of the Year, Alumnus of the Year and others, traditionally have been handed out at Commencement.

 

However, because the ongoing COVID-19 pandemic forced the college to make this year’s Commencement ceremony a drive-thru event, PCC leaders decided it would be best to organize a standalone virtual awards ceremony, which took place Thursday via Zoom software.

 

“Every employee, in my opinion, has done an outstanding job in an unprecedented period in our history,” PCC President Jim Ross said as the event got underway. “Everyone deserves thanks and recognition. You’ve done great.”

 

PCC Vice President of Financial Services Sherry Raby, one of the event’s key organizers, served as emcee for the ceremony. Leading off the event was the presentation of the Instructor of the Year award by Michelle Willis, the college’s Vice President of Instructional Services.

 

The award is voted on by PCC students.

 

This year’s top faculty honor went to Zac Schnell, who leads the college’s Environmental Science Technology and Environmental Management Technology programs. He also assists with OSHA training for Continuing Education and is PCC’s chair of General Studies.

 

Schnell, a Wilmington native and graduate of N.C. State University, is a fun, energetic and personable instructor who puts the interests of students first, Willis said. Ross added that Schnell has a positive and engaging personality as well as a thorough knowledge of his subject.

 

For his part, Schnell said he appreciated the award.

 

“I greatly appreciate this honor. This means a lot to me, and I am happy to help all however I can,” he said.

 

This year’s Adjunct Faculty Member of the Year award went to part-time Biology Instructor Carol Phillips. Like the Instructor of the Year award, the Adjunct Faculty award is voted on by PCC students.

 

Willis described Phillips, who was unable to participate in the online ceremony, as a patient, kind and easygoing instructor who takes time to work with students to ensure they understand the material. She is a true professional and is well-respected by students, Willis added.

 

The Pamlico Correctional Institution (PCI) Instructor of the Year award went to Human Resources Development Instructor Susan Adams. Like the other two instruction awards, the PCI Instructor of the Year honor is voted on by students – in this case, the students are offenders at the Bayboro prison who participate in the college’s highly successful prison education program there.

 

Adams, an armed forces veteran, was described by Willis as professional, fair and responsive to her students. Ross added that Adams was an enthusiastic, energetic person with a very positive attitude.

PCC’s Staff Member of the Year award went to Denise Meyerson, who coordinates the college’s Cultural & Life Enrichment program. The award is voted on by PCC employees.

 

Raby, who announced the staff award recipient, said Meyerson has a pleasant attitude and always offers a kind word to everyone she meets on campus. She uses her time well and is always looking for innovative ways to grow the popular program, Raby said.

 

Ross said Meyerson is a fantastic person who is well-regarded in the community. She is a familiar face at college events and is eager to help out.

 

The day’s final award, PCC Alumnus of the Year, went to Pamlico County Director of Senior Services Violet Ollison. PCC Foundation Executive Director Michelle Noevere announced the award, which was voted on by the Foundation’s Board of Directors.

 

Ollison is a Pamlico County native who earned an Associate’s Degree in General Education from the college in 2007. The degree enabled Ollison to advance in her career. She eventually enrolled at N.C. Wesleyan College and earned her bachelor’s degree last year.

 

Ollison, who participated in the online ceremony, thanked the college for putting her on track toward advancement in her career with the county.

 

Ross praised Ollison as an “outstanding individual” who clearly cares about helping others. Noevere said Ollison was a believer in the power of education.

 

To conclude the event, both Raby and Ross thanked PCC employees for their spirit of teamwork, flexibility and ongoing commitment to the college’s mission of making lives better.

 

“The college wouldn’t be what it is without all of you,” Raby said.

 

Ross added, “The bottom line of this is that you’re truly making the world better. All of you are truly changing the world.”

 

The president also noted that PCC employees were responsible for the college being ranked by Affordable Colleges Online as North Carolina’s best two-year college in providing online instruction.

 

Registration for online courses for the Fall 2020 semester continues through Aug. 27. For more information, contact the college at 252-249-1851, ext. 3002, or studentservices@pamlicocc.edu.

 


Graduates Honored at Drive-Thru Event

 

 

August 3, 2020

Pamlico Community College honored members of its Class of 2020 with a special drive-thru Commencement ceremony Friday evening outside the Delamar Center at the Grantsboro campus.

 

Even though it was socially distant and mask-adorned, the event was joyous and uplifting as 27 members of the graduating class came forward one at a time to receive the degrees, diplomas and certificates they earned this academic year at PCC.

 

Prospective graduates were allowed to bring family members and friends to the outdoor ceremony, which took place under a row of canopies posted above the sidewalk outside the Delamar Center’s entrance.

 

Each honoree was joined by family members and friends for a walk along a red carpet from the curb toward the podium. About 10 feet from the podium, family members and friends stopped, and the prospective graduate continued forward to the podium to hear his or her name called and to receive their hard-earned credential.

 

“This certainly is an extraordinary class of graduates for an extraordinary time in our nation’s history,” said PCC President Dr. Jim Ross, who congratulated each graduate and their families during the ceremony. “We are impressed by the determination, resourcefulness and flexibility of these graduates and we salute them for their achievements during this unusual period. We also acknowledge the support they have received from their families and friends on their journeys to academic achievement.”

 

After receiving their credential, the graduate rejoined his or her family members and friends for a photograph that the college will send to them free of charge. After each group returned to its vehicles, the next group drove forward for its walk along the red carpet. “Pomp and Circumstance” played on a portable speaker nearby, and the weather was clear, although seasonally warm and muggy.

 

Most graduates wore their blue caps and gowns. A few graduates decorated their caps, and many vehicles were adorned with signs and congratulatory messages.

 

The Commencement ceremony originally was scheduled for May 15 inside the Delamar Center auditorium, but was moved to July 31 because of the COVID-19 pandemic. To comply with restrictions put in place to slow the spread of the virus, PCC officials devised an outdoor ceremony where graduates could receive their credentials and their moments in the spotlight.

 

In all, nearly 70 men and women qualified to graduate with associate’s degrees, diplomas and certificates from PCC over the last year, including those who completed their coursework in the Spring 2020 semester, the Fall 2019 semester and the Summer 2019 session.

 

In addition, 50 credentials were earned by students in the college’s Continuing Education division, including certifications for Cardiac Monitor Technician, Medication Aide, Nurse Aide I and II and Phlebotomy Technician.

 

This year’s class includes graduates from California, Texas and Oregon. In fact, two Electroneurodiagnostic Technology graduates – Tracie J. Hardin and Lorenzo D. Randall – made the trip from Texas to attend the ceremony. The class’s youngest member is 18, and its oldest member is 56.

 

During the ceremony, Samantha D. Armstrong-Plumley of Grantsboro was honored as the 2020 Academic Excellence Award and also was named the college’s Student of the Year. Armstrong-Plumley graduated at the event with her Associate in Science degree.

 

As the recipient of the Academic Excellence Award, Armstrong-Plumley becomes Pamlico’s 2020 honoree in the N.C. Community College System’s “Great within the 58” list of high-achieving students.

 

Commencement is usually the occasion when annual awards, such as Instructor of the Year, Staff Member of the Year and Alumnus of the Year, are presented. Those honors will be announced at an online event scheduled for Aug. 13.

 

“All of us have had to make changes because of the pandemic. Commencement is no different,” Ross said. “I want to congratulate our students, their family members and our employees for their collective efforts to create a ceremony to recognize and honor our graduates in a safe manner. It was truly an extremely happy event, something we all need right now! The event had a true ‘family’ feel, which is representative of the culture we have worked to create at the college. My colleagues and I wish only the best for members of the Pamlico Community College Class of 2020.”

 


PCC’s Callahan Advises Students for Fall 2020

 

 

July 13, 2020

Pamlico Community College has brought in a familiar face this summer to help new and returning students get ready for the upcoming Fall 2020 semester.

 

Instructor Neil Callahan, who oversees the college’s Early Childhood Education program and serves as PCC’s coordinator of academic advising, is working with students to help them pick the courses and programs that match their interests and objectives.

 

The longtime instructor knows the ins and outs of academic advising and can help men and women find the options that will keep them on track toward their educational goals.

 

In recent days, Callahan has been reaching out to new and current PCC students as well as those who might have enrolled at PCC before but left before finishing.

 

“I advise students and answer any questions they may have in order to aid in their enrollment,” he said. “I remind students about completing their FAFSA forms so they can receive financial aid, if qualified, and I contact those eligible for funds from the CARES Act. I am here to aid my fellow academic advisors as well, as needed.”

 

Bringing Callahan in for the summer is the most recent way PCC has tried to connect with students so they can stay on track, reach their goals and improve their lives.

 

“We are always looking for ways to ensure students know they have assistance and support from Pamlico Community College,” said PCC President Dr. Jim Ross. “I have challenged everyone at PCC to make registering students and ensuring they complete their programs among their primary goals. We are committed to seeing students succeed and improve their lives and the lives of their families. Bringing Neil Callahan on board this summer is the latest part of that effort.”

 

Callahan is a native of Northampton County and a graduate of East Carolina University. He has worked as an instructor at PCC since January 2003.

 

At PCC, Callahan oversees a number of important academic initiatives, including both the Pirate Promise co-admission agreement with ECU and the ECU Partnership Teach effort for prospective educators.

 

He says PCC is a convenient place for students to get a high quality education without having to take on a great deal of debt.

 

“Pamlico Community College is great source of affordable higher education in the Pamlico area,” he said.

 

“Whether you want to earn a two-year degree, transfer to a university or enhance your job skills, we provide what you need right here in your own backyard. We provide these services and more with customer service unmatched in the area.”

 

PCC last year was ranked the No. 2 community college in America by SmartAsset, and it recently was named North Carolina’s best online two-year college by Affordable Colleges Online.

 

For the Fall 2020 semester, PCC plans to offer a huge slate of web-based courses that students can take at home. The college also plans to offer face-to-face classes in Allied Health, Cosmetology, Electrical Systems Technology and Welding.

 

New and returning students are encouraged to reach out to Callahan at 252-229-9710 or at ncallahan@pamlicocc.edu if they have questions about advising.

 

As always, new and returning students also can reach out to PCC’s Student Services division for assistance at 252-249-1851, ext. 3002, or studentservices@pamlico.edu.

 

Registration for the Fall 2020 semester is scheduled for Aug. 5 and 6 from 8:30 a.m. to 7 p.m. Seated classes will begin Aug. 17, and online classes start Aug. 28.

 


Get Ready for Fall Registration at PCC!

 

 

July 6, 2020

Summertime is here, but it isn’t too early to start thinking about enrolling for the Fall 2020 semester at Pamlico Community College, ranked by SmartAsset as the No. 2 ranked community college in America!

 

Registration is scheduled for Aug. 5 and 6 from 8:30 a.m. to 7 p.m.

 

Incoming students who plan to attend PCC later this year are encouraged to contact Student Services staffers now so they can be ready to register in August.

 

Students who plan to attend PCC can go ahead and complete tasks such as applying to the college through the cfnc.org website and arranging for financial aid. They also can ensure their high school and college transcripts are sent to PCC in a timely manner.

 

“Now is a great time to start the process for attending college,” said PCC President Dr. Jim Ross. “This has been a challenging time for everyone, but all of us at Pamlico Community College are working hard to ensure we continue to offer convenient, high quality educational options so men and women can improve their lives.”

 

PCC plans to offer a huge slate of web-based courses that students can take at home. Pamlico recently was honored by Affordable Colleges Online as North Carolina’s top two-year online college.

 

The college also plans to offer face-to-face classes in Allied Health, Cosmetology, Electrical Systems Technology and Welding.

 

Seated classes will begin Aug. 17, and online classes start Aug. 28.

 

“We’re honored to serve our community with nationally recognized educational offerings,” Ross said.

 

“Regardless of whether you’re looking to start your educational journey or want to continue moving forward toward your academic goal, the college can help. I encourage new and returning students to contact the college today to explore their options.”

 

For more information about enrolling at PCC this fall, please contact Student Services at 252-249-1851, ext. 3002, or studentservices@pamlicocc.edu.

 


Register to Vote in the 2020 Election

 

 

July 1, 2020

If you need information on how to register to vote, please visit the following link to the Pamlico County Board of Elections: http://www.pamlicocounty.org/board-of-elections.aspx

 


PCC Named State’s Top Online Two-Year College

 

 

June 29, 2020

In the past three years, Pamlico Community College has earned multiple national and state awards for excellence, including recognition this year as the second-ranked community college in America. It has now added to that record of high-quality service to its students and community. Pamlico Community College has recently been ranked as North Carolina’s best online community college for 2020 by Affordable Colleges Online (AC Online).

 

PCC’s No. 1 ranking, which was announced by AC Online earlier this month, reflects the college’s ongoing commitment to continual improvement in providing low cost, high quality academic programs that are accessible and convenient.

 

The recognition by AC Online comes less than a year after PCC was honored as the No. 2 community college in America by SmartAsset, a New York-based personal technology company. Within the last three years, the Aspen Institute also named PCC to its 2018-19 prestigious list of 150 elite community colleges in America and invited the college to apply for its $1 million Aspen Prize.

 

News of Pamlico Community College’s ranking as the state’s best community college in online instruction is timely as it comes after the Spring 2020 semester in which PCC and the state’s other colleges and universities moved nearly all their academic programs and offerings to an online format because of the Coronavirus/COVID-19 pandemic.

 

PCC President Dr. Jim Ross said he was deeply honored to learn about the college’s latest recognition for excellence, and he credited the extraordinary teamwork and dedication of the college’s faculty and staff as the key reasons for the latest success.

 

“All of us at Pamlico Community College are delighted and humbled by this recognition,” he said. “This honor belongs to our outstanding faculty and staff who work hard to continually improve in serving our students and community in a high-quality manner no matter what challenges we face. Online instruction is an extremely powerful tool for working men and women and all others who want to improve their lives. We are honored to be recognized for excellence in this increasingly-important component of higher education, particularly during this time.”

 

In its announcement, AC Online said colleges and universities on its list of Best Online Colleges in North Carolina represented the best and most effective options for online education in North Carolina.

“These schools combine academic excellence and low tuition costs to give students the most value for their dollar,” the organization’s website states. “We ranked these schools based on quantitative metrics such as graduation rate and in-state tuition cost, along with qualitative factors like availability of career advising services and academic resources.”

 

AC Online used data from the U.S. Department of Education and other sources to compile its rankings. Key metrics included the number and breadth of online programs available, student-teacher ratio, accessibility to financial aid, availability of academic and career counseling services and cost.

 

PCC received a score of 100, according to the rankings. The No. 2 community college’s score was 92.78.

 

PCC features a wide range of academic programs that can be completed entirely online, including career programs and university transfer options. Pamlico is the only N.C. community college offering an online Environmental Management Technology program, and it is one of a small number of community colleges in the nation offering Electroneurodiagnostic Technology online.

 

The college’s Continuing Education division has moved its Basic Skills classes online because of the pandemic.

 

In addition, students currently enrolled at other community colleges in the state frequently enroll at PCC as “special credit” students to pick up an online course they need to complete their programs.

 

Registration for the Fall 2020 semester is set for Aug. 5 and 6. As always, PCC will be featuring a large number of online courses to best serve its community. With an overall student-teacher ratio of 9-to-1, students can expect to receive individual attention and helpful support.

 

For more information about enrolling at Pamlico Community College, call 252-249-1851, ext. 3002.

 

For details about AC Online’s rankings, visit: https://www.affordablecollegesonline.org/online-colleges/north-carolina/

 

 


PCC Helps Woman Start Health Care Career

 

 

June 19, 2020

Jessica Phillips’s path to her new career in health care wasn’t always smooth and straight, but with determination, heart and a little help from Pamlico Community College and others, she completed the journey.

 

Earlier this month, the 28-year-old Grantsboro woman started a full-time job as a medical assistant at CarolinaEast Internal Medicine in New Bern. The stable, Monday-through-Friday job in a career field where she can help people is exactly what Phillips had in mind when she returned to college in 2019.

 

“I always wanted to be in the medical field,” she said. “I want to help people.”

 

It wasn’t easy for Phillips to reach her goal. As a single mother of three boys, she faced personal and financial challenges that threatened to set her back. It also took a lot of work.

 

But Phillips said it was worth it.

 

PCC President Dr. Jim Ross said students such as Phillips come to Pamlico Community College every semester with the goal of helping others while also improving their lives and the lives of their families.

 

“Jessica Phillips’s story is one of perseverance and determination,” he said. “We know it hasn’t been easy for her. That’s why it’s very rewarding for all of us at PCC to see Jessica and other students overcome obstacles and reach their goals. That’s the entire reason why we’re here.”

 

Phillips was born in Shelby County, Tenn., but has spent most of her life in Pamlico County.

 

She first came to PCC to complete her GED. After finishing her high school equivalency, Phillips decided to stick around and enroll in the college’s Medical Assisting program.

 

However, not long after enrolling, she decided to take a job with the Pamlico County Department of Social Services. She stayed there four years, but really wanted to return to college and finish the Medical Assisting program.

 

Thanks to some financial help from the federal Workforce Innovation and Opportunity Act (WIOA) program through the PCC Career Center, Phillips was able to enroll at the college full time and take a part-time job as a cashier at Food Lion.

 

The decision felt right, but money was tight. Also, Phillips had to retake some courses because of the amount of time that had elapsed since she had been at PCC the first time.

 

Through it all, she did well, earning A’s in all of her courses – well, except for math, she says. She took a combination of convenient online courses and hands-on seated classes, which was essential to help her balance school, work and family responsibilities.

 

Phillips also was able to overcome financial obstacles while at PCC. She received some financial assistance through the PCC Foundation, the Golden LEAF Foundation and other sources to help her address emergency needs, including vehicle expenses and other issues.

 

Most importantly, she also overcame the urge to quit, which is something she warns prospective students that they, too, will face.

 

“The biggest thing is don’t give up, even though you want to every day,” Phillips said.

 

Better days are ahead. After completing her clinical hours at CarolinaEast Internal Medicine, the practice hired her for a full-time post this month. In her job, she works with all of the doctors in the practice and has more responsibilities than she did as a student intern.

 

Her work schedule also allows her to be available for her three boys.

 

Phillips credits the college, its faculty and its staffers for helping her overcome obstacles and reach her goal. She specifically credits former PCC staffer Eric Cedars and current PCC Career Center Director Cristy Lewis Warner for their encouragement and responsiveness.

 

“Students like Jessica Phillips are amazing examples of what people with dreams and passion can do at a college that supports them as individuals with individual needs,” Warner said. “We enjoy working with individuals to help them discover their purpose, find the pathway to it, and then guiding and assisting them along the way. Whether it is career counseling, financial aid or whatever it takes, we are there to help students identify resources both on campus and in our community that can help them find their success at Pamlico Community College.”

 

Phillips said PCC has helped her reach her goals and improve life for her family.

 

“A big thank you to Pamlico!” she said.

 

For more information about the Career Center and its services, please contact Cristy Lewis Warner at 252-249-1851, ext. 3014, or by email at cwarner@pamlicocc.edu. For information about PCC’s Medical Assisting program, contact Tina Hardison at 252-249-1851, ext. 3044, or thardison@pamlicocc.edu.

 

 

 


Cosmetology Students Get a Head Start at PCC

 

 

June 14, 2020

Hair isn’t the only thing Pamlico Community College Cosmetology students Cecilia Holton and Chelsea Dietz know how to cut.

 

Because the two Pamlico County women began their studies through the N.C. Career & College Promise (CCP) program while they were still in high school, they were able to cut both the amount of money they had to spend on school and the amount of time before starting their careers.

 

Holton, pictured at left, an 18-year-old from Olympia who graduated from Pamlico County High School on June 12, is scheduled to earn her Cosmetology diploma from PCC in July. Because she took PCC courses through the CCP program while in high school, she did not have to pay college tuition and is beginning her professional career as a teenager.

 

Dietz, pictured at right, a 20-year-old from Grantsboro, graduated from PCHS in 2019. She began taking PCC Cosmetology courses as a high school senior. She is scheduled to graduate with her Cosmetology certificate in July and will begin her career before she turns 21. Dietz only had to pay tuition for a few PCC courses she took after graduating from the high school.

 

“The experiences of both Cecilia Holton and Chelsea Dietz show the tremendous opportunities available at Pamlico Community College for motivated high school students,” said PCC President Dr. Jim Ross. “Both of these students have gotten a head start on their careers and have been able to complete their studies without taking on a tremendous amount of debt. The Career & College Promise program is a powerful tool for high schoolers who want to get ahead in a great career or who want to save money on their college degrees.”

 

Both Holton and Dietz said they had always had an interest in hairstyling. Holton received a mannequin head for her 13th birthday and later got a salon-style chair installed in her bedroom.

 

Dietz, meanwhile, said she’s always enjoyed braiding hair and discussing the business with her aunt, who is a professional hairstylist.

 

Both women have an artistic flair. Dietz, who enjoys drawing and painting, even had one of her works featured on a local calendar.

 

Holton and Dietz, who formally met as PCC students at the Cosmetology Building in Bayboro, also style and add highlights to each other’s hair.

 

In addition to learning the ins and outs of Cosmetology, the two have learned other key lessons while in the program, including the importance of building relationships and the advantage of getting a head start on your career.

 

“I learned a lot more than just about hair,” Dietz said. “If you can, start early.”

 

Holton agreed, saying, “It all worked out.”

 

Cosmetology Instructor Debi Fulcher said both Holton and Dietz were talented stylists and good students.

 

“I can say that the instructors here at the Cosmetology department are so proud of these two young ladies,” she said. “Both have learned and worked hard to get where they are today. You can see the talent they have to make it in this industry. They enjoy pleasing and making their clients feel beautiful. We believe that these two students are a positive role model for other students. We are very proud of them and wish them the best.”

 

For more information about the Career & College Promise program, talk to your high school counselor or contact PCC’s Derek Godwin at 252-745-7349 or dgodwin@pamlicocc.edu.

 

For more information about PCC’s Cosmetology program, contact Debi Fulcher at 252-745-5537 or dfulcher@pamlicocc.edu.

 

 

 

 


PCC Can Train You to Operate a Forklift!

 

 

June 8, 2020

Students soon will have three opportunities to take Pamlico Community College’s one-day, face-to-face Forklift Training course and become certified to operate these important machines.

 

The college plans to offer the course on Saturday, June 27, from 8 a.m. to 5 p.m. Additional one-day sessions are scheduled for Saturday, July 11, and Saturday, July 25.

 

The course includes classroom instruction and hands-on learning. It costs $70 to enroll.

 

The Forklift Training course is part of PCC’s commitment to helping provide local men and women with the skills and knowledge that employers need as the region reopens its economy.

 

PCC President Dr. Jim Ross said the college’s Forklift Training course and other new Continuing Education offerings build on PCC’s commitment to meeting the education and training needs of the community.

 

“We are pleased to offer courses to help community residents develop the skills they need for today’s workplaces,” he said in a previous interview. “Short-term training classes are ideal for working people who want to enhance their abilities and explore new career options.”

 

Ross continued, “Our College has dramatically expanded the number of vocational class offerings such as this for our community. It is important for our students and their family members to recognize it is just as honorable a career for those who work with their hands as it is for those who do desk work. Both are important. Our society needs more well-trained employees in the vocational fields to serve employers’ needs, and our college will continue to invest in equipment and programs to dramatically increase these courses as we did this year.”

 

For her part, PCC Chair of Continuing Education and Technical Programs Lori Giles said, “If you are looking for a job or need additional skills for your current job, our Forklift Training course is a great choice for you. The course will enhance your skill set and increase your employability. PCC also can provide Forklift Training for businesses and industries that need assistance with training their current employees.”

 

Instructor Joe Flynn will teach PCC’s one-day Forklift Training course. Students will learn to safely operate a forklift by using the college’s new, propane-powered one that’s nearly identical to forklifts used in factories and warehouses throughout the country.

 

Flynn also plans to teach a Yard Art Welding class beginning June 22 and running through Aug. 19. The class will meet on Mondays and Wednesdays from 5 to 9 p.m. Cost to enroll is $180.

 

For more information about the Forklift Training course or the Yard Art Welding course, contact Lori Giles at 252-249-1851, ext. 3015, or lgiles@pamlicocc.edu.

 

 

 

 


GED, ESL Courses Set to Resume at PCC

 

 

June 1, 2020

The first step to achieving any goal is to master the basics. In that spirit, Pamlico Community College soon will be enrolling new students for its Basic Skills courses, including the High School Equivalency (GED) and English as a Second Language (ESL) programs.

 

These Basic Skills classes will be offered in a virtual format through the Zoom platform at no charge.

 

The High School Equivalency program gives adults the opportunity to complete their high school studies so they can be ready to move on to find better jobs, earn raises and promotions or continue their education at the college.

 

Meanwhile, PCC’s ESL courses give non-English speakers a chance to hone their skills so they can be better prepared to participate in the local community.

 

“Basic Skills instruction has continued throughout the Spring 2020 semester using a virtual platform,” said Lori Giles, the college’s chair of Continuing Education and Technical Programs. “We are registering students for the next semester now. The classes meet over Zoom at regularly scheduled times. I encourage men and women to enroll today so they can start their journeys to success.”

 

PCC’s Basic Skills courses are taught by highly qualified instructors who want to see adults reach their academic goals. The course content can be rigorous, but instructors are eager to assist students master the material and move forward.

 

“There is no better way to improve your life than through education, and PCC is here to help men and women complete the first steps in that process,” said PCC President Dr. Jim Ross. “Both the High School Equivalency classes and the English as a Second Language classes are free and easily accessible, but more importantly, they are key components to improving people’s lives. I encourage adults who want to finish what they started years ago to contact PCC today and get started.”

 

For more information about PCC’s Basic Skills courses, contact Lori Giles at 252-249-1851, ext. 3015, or lgiles@pamlicocc.edu.

 

 

 

 


PCC Helps Motivated Student Stay on Track

 

 

May 27, 2020

It’s going to take more than a pandemic to keep Pamlico Community College student Annemarie Brown from working on her college degree and related safety credentials.

 

The driven, 28-year-old Jacksonville woman is determined to complete her associate’s degree in Environmental Management Technology and to secure her federal OSHA and HAZWOPER training certifications so she can begin her work to improve the air, water and land.

 

“For the longest time, I wanted to be a marine biologist. Now I really want to protect the earth and the oceans in a sustainable way,” Brown said, adding that she plans to secure a bachelor’s degree and master’s degree after completing her studies at PCC.

 

To stay on track at PCC, she and her classmates had to complete a face-to-face emergency training scenario this semester. Doing so would enable Brown and the others to complete the safety class (Industrial Science 121) for their degrees and allow them to earn their OSHA safety cards and HAZWOPER training certifications.

 

The problem, of course, was PCC and other colleges and universities had moved all instruction to an online format in response to the COVID-19 pandemic. On-campus activities were not taking place.

 

Brown reached out to PCC President Dr. Jim Ross, who earlier had sent a letter to all students asking them to notify him about any problems they were having because of the pandemic.

 

“Annemarie responded to my e-mail with a heartfelt letter about her problem, and I immediately went to work to have our college help her and her classmates,” the president said.

 

Ross, PCC Environmental Instructor Zac Schnell and Vice President of Instructional Services Michelle Willis came up with a workaround that would allow Brown and her classmates to take part in an on-campus, face-to-face training session.

 

The four-hour training activity, which took place May 20, complied with social distancing rules and newly released guidance from state officials.

 

Brown credits Ross with quickly responding to the dilemma and working to ensure the class could stay on track.

 

“He was so forthcoming, generous and genuine,” she said. “I was surprised by the speed of his response and his empathy.”

 

Brown knows something about moving quickly. She grew up in Utah and came to North Carolina after her husband, a Marine, was stationed at Camp Lejeune.

 

Brown brought with her some college credits she had earned at Weber State University and a strong desire to study Environmental Management.

 

She discovered PCC offered the program she wanted – in fact, it’s the only community college in North Carolina to offer the Environmental Management Technology degree. The program also can be completed entirely online, which meant Brown would not have to commute to Pamlico County from Jacksonville.

 

“I didn’t want to contribute to CO2 emissions,” she said.

 

Schnell said Brown has been a fantastic addition to the program.

 

“She is very positive and eager to learn,” he said. “She has a lot already planned out for her future.”

 

With her credits from Weber State in tow, Brown will finish her associate’s degree in Spring 2021. She hopes to secure an internship in her field while she prepares to continue her studies at a four-year university.

 

By then, her husband will be out of the Marine Corps and will be looking to start his college career, she said.

 

“I’m happy that we could accommodate Annemarie Brown and her classmates in this instance and keep them on track,” Ross said. “I’m proud of directly communicating with students during this semester and seeking to learn of their problems so I could directly be their advocates. This is a perfect example of that unique approach working.”

 

For more information about PCC’s Environmental Management Technology and Environmental Science Technology programs, contact Schnell at zschnell@pamlicocc.edu.

 

 

 

 


Act Now! PCC Summer Classes Begin May 26

 

 

May 18, 2020

Students still have time to register for Summer Term curriculum courses at Pamlico Community College, but they need to move fast.

 

The college is offering the largest slate of Summer Term curriculum courses in its history so students can get ahead, get caught up or pick up a much-needed class they have been unable to take.

 

Most of the courses will be offered online and will be open to new and current PCC students as well as students who are enrolled in college elsewhere.

 

Face-to-face courses are planned in Welding, although those classes must have 10 or fewer students and everyone enrolled must adhere to social distancing requirements.

 

Curriculum classes begin next Tuesday, May 26, with full-term courses running through Aug. 3. The college will be closed Monday, May 25, for Memorial Day, so students should act now to sign up.

 

“Summer can be a great time for students to get ahead in their curriculum studies or to pick up a class they have not been able to find, either at PCC or another institution,” said PCC President Dr. Jim Ross. “Students who are enrolled elsewhere and now are home from school might be looking for an opportunity to take a course or two that they need. We can help you, but you need to contact the college this week.”

 

Transferable course options will include web-based curriculum classes in Art, Biology, Business Administration, Chemistry, Computer Information Systems, Economics, English, Geology, History, Math, Music Appreciation, Psychology, Spanish, Sociology and more.

 

In addition, the college also will be offering online courses in career programs such as Criminal Justice Technology, Dental Laboratory Technology, Electrical Systems Technology, Electroneurodiagnostic Technology and Human Services Technology.

 

“Everyone at PCC wants to help students stay on track so they can achieve their academic goals and improve their lives,” Ross said earlier. “We did that when we converted all of our curriculum courses to an online format this semester, and we plan to do our best to make our Summer Term course offerings as robust, convenient and accessible as possible.”

 

For information about enrolling for the Summer Term, please contact Student Services at studentservices@pamlicocc.edu or by phone at 252-249-1851, ext. 3002.

 

*****

 

For men and women who are looking for short-term job-training courses, PCC will be offering a series of face-to-face Continuing Education courses beginning next week.

 

Classes must follow safety protocols and social distancing requirements, PCC leaders say.

 

As of now, the planned courses include:

* Medication Aide, Tuesdays and Thursdays, beginning Tuesday, May 26

* Electrical Wiring, Tuesdays and Thursdays, 3 to 6 p.m., beginning Tuesday, May 26

* Welding, Mondays and Wednesdays, 5 to 9 p.m., beginning Wednesday, May 27

* Cardiac Monitor Technician, Mondays, beginning Monday, June 1

 

In addition, plans are in development to offer the popular Nurse Aide I course beginning June 8, as well as the Nurse Aide II course, with a start date projected sometime in June. Additional courses, including Notary and Phlebotomy, could be added to the schedule as circumstances permit, PCC leaders say.

 

“All of us at the college are very excited about this slate of face-to-face classes,” Ross said. “Men and women who enroll in these Continuing Education courses will be able to secure valuable credentials and learn critical skills that our local economy needs right now.”

 

For more information about the new slate of face-to-face Continuing Education courses, please contact Lori Giles at lgiles@pamlicocc.edu or 252-249-1851, ext. 3015.

 

 

 


Face-to-Face Training Courses Now Underway

 

 

May 27, 2020

Pamlico Community College is offering a slate of face-to-face job-training courses to help men and women acquire the skills they need to secure critical jobs in the slowly reopening economy.

 

Classes must follow safety protocols and social distancing requirements, PCC leaders say.

 

“We are excited about this slate of face-to-face classes,” said PCC President Dr. Jim Ross. “Students who enroll in these Continuing Education courses will be able to secure valuable credentials and learn critical skills that our local economy needs right now.”

 

As of now, the planned courses include:

* Cardiac Monitor Technician, Mondays, beginning June 1

* Welding, Mondays and Wednesdays, 5 to 9 p.m., beginning June 10

* Electrical Wiring, Tuesdays and Thursdays, 3 to 6 p.m., beginning June 11

* Notary Public, Saturday, June 20

* Medication Aide, Thursdays, 9 a.m. to 2:30 p.m., beginning June 25

 

“Pamlico Community College is ready to provide valuable instruction in health care services and mission-critical facility maintenance courses to support the community as we continue to deal with the COVID-19 pandemic,” said PCC Chair of Continuing Education and Technical Programs Lori Giles. “Students in these courses will receive the training and credentials they need to secure jobs our region really needs as we begin the recovery.”

 

The college also is working with students, instructors and others to find ways to complete several Continuing Education courses that started earlier this year. Among those courses are Nurse Aide I and Phlebotomy Technician.

 

“Even though this has been a challenging time, I thank our team-oriented employees for continuing to provide high-quality instruction and services,” Ross said. “We are working hard to find ways for students in our curriculum programs and in our Continuing Education courses to reach their academic and training goals. We also are pleased to play an important role in our region’s recovery.”

 

For more information about the new slate of face-to-face Continuing Education courses, please email Lori Giles at lgiles@pamlicocc.edu or LaTanya Bryant at lbryant@pamlicocc.edu. You also can call the college at 252-249-1851, ext. 3015.

 

 

 


Summer Term Courses Available Now at PCC!

 

 

May 4, 2020

Pamlico Community College is offering the largest slate of Summer Term curriculum courses in its history so students can get ahead, get caught up or pick up a much-needed class they have been unable to take.

 

Nearly all of the courses will be offered online and will be open to new and current PCC students as well as students who are enrolled in college elsewhere.

 

Face-to-face courses are planned in Welding, although those classes must have 10 or fewer students and everyone enrolled must adhere to social distancing requirements.

 

Plans also are being developed to offer selected curriculum and Continuing Education courses in Allied Health programs. Details will be announced soon.

 

The Summer Term course schedule is available at: http://www.pamlicocc.edu/resources-classschedules.php

 

Registration is underway now. Curriculum classes begin May 26, with full-term courses running through Aug. 3.

 

“Summer can be a great time for PCC students to get ahead in their curriculum studies or to complete a class they have not been able to find,” said PCC President Dr. Jim Ross. “We also recognize that students who are enrolled elsewhere are now home from school and might be looking for an opportunity to pick up a course or two that they need. Whatever your goals, PCC’s Summer Term course offerings can help!”

 

PCC leaders say they beefed up the Summer Term course schedule to help PCC students and others.

 

“We added 15 additional classes to the summer schedule with most of them being transferable to the UNC system,” said PCC Vice President of Instruction Michelle Willis. “This was done so university students would be able to take transferable classes for a fraction of the cost of university tuition while they are home this summer. Our instructors are seasoned employees with experience teaching online and providing rigorous content.”

 

Transferable course options will include web-based curriculum classes in Art, Biology, Business Administration, Chemistry, Computer Information Systems, Economics, English, Geology, History, Math, Music Appreciation, Psychology, Spanish, Sociology and more.

 

In addition, the college also will be offering online courses in career programs such as Criminal Justice Technology, Dental Laboratory Technology, Electrical Systems Technology, Electroneurodiagnostic Technology and Human Services Technology.

 

PCC’s face-to-face courses in Welding will be the first seated courses available since the college converted all courses to an online format in March.

 

“Everyone at PCC wants to help students stay on track so they can achieve their academic goals and improve their lives,” Ross said. “We did that when we converted all of our curriculum courses to an online format this semester, and we plan to do our best to make our Summer Term course offerings as robust, convenient and accessible as possible.”

 

New and returning students will not be able to meet face-to-face with Student Services officials or faculty advisors on campus at this time. However, PCC leaders are encouraging students to reach out to their advisors or other college officials by email to see what their Summer Term options are. Faculty advisors also are contacting their students.

 

New students and those who are enrolled elsewhere but want to take PCC courses can contact Student Services at studentservices@pamlicocc.edu or by phone at 252-249-1851, ext. 3002, to get started.

 

For information about financial aid at PCC, contact Director of Financial Aid Meredith Beeman at mbeeman@pamlicocc.edu.

 

It’s also not too early to start thinking about enrolling for the Fall 2020 semester at Pamlico Community College. Current students who plan to attend PCC are encouraged to contact with their faculty advisors by email so they can be ready for Fall Registration. Prospective students are encouraged to contact Student Services at studentservices@pamlicocc.edu or by phone at 252-249-1851, ext. 3002.

 

“This has been a very unusual academic year, but all of us at PCC are working to respond in a positive way so we can assist students,” Ross said. “Contact us today to see how we can help.”

 

 

 


PCC Foundation Helps Students Find Funds

 

 

April 27, 2020

Pamlico Community College leaders are working hard to help students secure the resources they need to deal with the effects of the ongoing Coronavirus/COVID-19 pandemic and to be ready for the upcoming Summer Term.

 

For example, PCC Foundation Executive Director Michelle Noevere and members of the Foundation Board marshalled funds from their budget to give relief grants to current students who encountered financial hardships because of the virus outbreak.

 

The money, named the COVER’d Relief Fund as an acronym for COVID Emergency Relief, was used to help 11 students take care of emergencies so they could remain enrolled for the current semester.

 

Meanwhile, PCC Director of Financial Aid Meredith Beeman is busy exploring how federal funds from the CARES Act might be able to help students. She also is sharing the message that PCC students who receive Pell Grants might be able to use them for Summer Term courses.

 

Beeman remains committed to helping students explore a range of other financial aid sources, such as work-study and scholarships, so they can be ready to enroll in Summer Term courses or the Fall 2020 semester.

 

“All of us at Pamlico Community College are working hard to help students remain enrolled during this extremely unusual time in our history,” said PCC President Dr. Jim Ross. “We salute Michelle Noevere and the Foundation Board for reviewing their budget to find emergency relief money for students, and we’re confident Meredith Beeman and the Student Services staff will be able to decipher the forthcoming rules on the CARES funds so we can assist as many students as possible.”

 

The president continued, “We want students to know we’re doing everything we can to meet their needs. We encourage them to contact us to see how we can help.”

 

COVER’d Relief Fund

 

Noevere said she and the Foundation Board recognized financial surprises can derail PCC students’ academic plans.

 

“Having lived in Pamlico County for 23 years and being employed at the college for the past 13 years, I know many families struggle to make ends meet even in the best of times, and that includes our students,” she said. “Now that many of our students are furloughed from jobs or have had their hours cut, they are struggling even more to pay bills and put food on the table.”

 

After reviewing the PCC Foundation budget for some money for an emergency fund, Noevere and her team set up an application process for students.

 

In the end, the Foundation was able to help 11 PCC students respond to financial emergencies so they could remain in school.

 

“The needs ranged from paying an insurance bill to buying a week or two’s worth of groceries and putting a little gas in their cars,” Noevere said. “One student told us she has three young children, and both her and her husband’s incomes were slashed because they were furloughed by the nonessential businesses they work for. She told us if this goes on much longer, they will have to choose between buying groceries and paying the electricity bill.”

 

She said in one case, a student who works in the food service industry was fearful of going to work and accidentally bringing the virus home to her infant.

 

“Other applicants are fortunate to work in an industry where they still are employed, but they also have young children home from school, so they have had to hire a babysitter,” Noevere said. “That’s an expense they cannot afford. Another told us she applied for unemployment, but is still waiting to be approved.”

 

Noevere said the COVER’d funds were exhausted quickly and that at least six applicants had to be turned away. The Foundation now is soliciting money to replenish the COVER’d fund so it can help more students.

 

Tax-deductible donations can be made to the Pamlico Community College Foundation, P.O. Box 185, Grantsboro, N.C. 28529 for the COVER’d Relief Fund, or visit http://www.pamlicocc.edu/about-foundation.php and use the secure Donate button to make a gift online.

 

Financial aid

 

Meanwhile, Beeman and other college leaders are reviewing the recently passed CARES Act to see how PCC students might be helped.

 

“The federal government has set aside some emergency funds that colleges will be able to use to assist students. However, we don’t have final guidelines from either the federal government or state community college officials on eligibility criteria or its use at this time,” she said.

 

As details of the CARES funds are sorted out, Beeman is focused on helping current PCC students who are interested in Summer Term courses.

 

She and other Student Services staffers also are available to help students who now attend college elsewhere register at PCC for a Summer Term class while they’re home.

 

PCC plans to offer its largest slate of Summer Term courses in its history.

 

For more information about financial aid at PCC, contact Beeman at mbeeman@pamlicocc.edu.

 

For general information about Summer Term courses, please email studentservices@pamlicocc.edu.

 

 

 


Pamlico Staffers Help Students Stay on Track

 

 

April 10, 2020

Pamlico Community College’s Student Services team is ready to help students find the resources and assistance they need to finish this extraordinary semester in great shape.

 

Like nearly all PCC employees, Student Services staffers are working remotely. Nevertheless, they can still help students with financial aid issues, career services, registration inquiries and general questions.

 

Help is just an email away, they say.

 

“All of us at Pamlico Community College want to help students finish strong and move closer to completing their educational goals,” said PCC President Dr. Jim Ross. “Vice President of Student Services Jamie Gibbs and his entire team are ready to answer questions and point people in the right direction. These are unusual times for everyone, but our college’s commitment to student success is unchanged.”

 

PCC Director of Financial Aid Meredith Beeman is the contact person for questions about financial assistance, including grants and scholarships.

 

“I have a computer at home that allows me to access important college files,” she said. “That enables me to answer any student’s questions about their potential financial aid for the upcoming Summer Term or for the 2020-21 academic year.”

 

Beeman soon will be sending by email information about Golden LEAF Foundation scholarships for the Summer Term, including the required application.

 

To be eligible for a Summer Term scholarship from Golden LEAF, students must be registered for courses and have a 2019-20 FAFSA on file, she said, adding the deadline to apply is May 14.

 

For questions about this or any other financial aid matter, contact Beeman by email at mbeeman@pamlicocc.edu.

 

Meanwhile, PCC’s Cristy Lewis Warner is available to help with Career Center services and with information about community resources for students who need them because of the Coronavirus/COVID-19 outbreak.

 

She also is available to assist students with signing up for Summer Term and Fall 2020 semester courses and can help them utilize the college’s free online tutoring service.

 

Warner can be reached by email at cwarner@pamlicocc.edu.

 

Any other Student Services-related inquiries can be directed to Vice President Jamie Gibbs at jgibbs@pamlicocc.edu or to the Student Services general email address, which is studentservices@pamlicocc.edu.

 

For his part, Ross said he is reaching out to students to see how he can help them during this unprecedented time.

 

“I am asking for their input and inviting them to contact me,” he said, adding that he has asked all employees to notify him about any issues students might be having.

 

“I will be calling students each week to encourage them, to keep their spirits up,” Ross said.

 

All college departments are committed to seeing students succeed, PCC leaders say.

 

“We are all on the same team for this educational journey,” Warner said. “Please let us know how we can help you. Go Pamlico!”

 

Check out the college’s “Pamlico Strong!” video here: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=FX1RwEgvo-E&feature=youtu.be

 

For more information about signing up for the Summer Term, please email studentservices@pamlicocc.edu.

 

 

 


Summer Registration Gets Underway at PCC

 

 

April 7, 2020

Summer can be a great time to get ahead in your curriculum studies or to complete a class that you have not been able to find. Pamlico Community College’s Summer Term course offerings can help!

 

Registration for Summer Term courses is now underway at PCC. Summer classes will begin May 26, with full-term courses running through Aug. 3.

 

The college plans to offer a wide variety of online course options for Summer Term students, including web-based classes in Biology, Criminal Justice, Computer Information, English, Geology, History, Math, Music Appreciation and others.

 

At this time, PCC also has scheduled face-to-face courses in Cosmetology and Welding, although those classes might be unavailable depending on the status of Coronavirus/COVID-19 outbreak.

 

The summer term class schedule is available here.

 

“No one knows what the virus situation in America will look like in May, but we are confident that PCC will be able to offer a wide range of online curriculum classes for interested students at that time,” said PCC President Dr. Jim Ross. “We also are hopeful that we’ll be able to offer the seated courses we have scheduled in Cosmetology and Welding. We’re taking those steps now.”

 

The President continued, “The Summer Term has traditionally been a convenient time for students to pick up the courses they need to reach their educational goals, and we are committed to continuing to offer high quality online classes as we have during the current semester. Whatever you’re looking for, Pamlico Community College is here to help.”

 

New and returning students will not be able to meet face-to-face with Student Services officials or their faculty advisors on campus at this time. However, PCC leaders are encouraging students to reach out to their advisors or other college officials by email to see what their Summer Term options are. Faculty advisors also are contacting their students.

 

A complete list of PCC employee emails is available here.

 

The general Student Services email address is studentservices@pamlicocc.edu.

 

“All of us at PCC want to help students stay on track so they can achieve their goals and improve their lives,” Ross said. “We did that when we converted all curriculum courses to an online format this semester, and we plan to do our best to make the Summer Term as convenient and accessible as possible.”

 

It’s also not too early to start thinking about enrolling for the Fall 2020 semester at Pamlico Community College. Current students who plan to attend PCC are encouraged to contact with their faculty advisors by email so they can be ready for Fall Registration. Likewise, faculty advisors are contacting their current students.

 

Please note the college will be closed on Monday, April 13.

 

“This is undoubtedly the most unusual semester in our college’s history, but we are committed to serving our community with nationally recognized educational offerings,” Ross said. “Regardless of whether you’re looking to continue your educational journey or get ahead in your studies, the college can help. I encourage you to reach out to PCC today.”

 

For additional information about Summer Term Registration, please contact Vice President of Student Services Jamie Gibbs by email at jgibbs@pamlicocc.edu.

 

 

 


Teamwork, Optimism Keep PCC Operating

 

 

March 31, 2020

Through teamwork, web-based technology and a healthy dose of optimism, Pamlico Community College continues to offer high quality instruction and provide valuable services to its students and community residents.

 

Two weeks ago, college leaders moved all curriculum courses to an online format. They also asked most employees to work from home and to continue essential operations as best they could.

 

The changes were made as the community, state and nation take important steps to slow the spread of the Coronavirus and the COVID-19 respiratory disease it causes.

 

Students and employees have embraced the changes, and the college continues to function essentially as it would during a normal semester.

 

“The positive, extraordinary teamwork has been inspiring,” said PCC President Dr. Jim Ross. “Our college has made these adjustments in a highly professional and nearly seamless manner. By all accounts I have received, the overall instruction to our students remains high quality and the overall service to our students remains high quality. I sincerely thank everyone for helping to make these major adjustments extremely successful.”

 

Additional changes will be necessary, however. Most notably, the president has decided to move the Commencement ceremony, originally scheduled for May 15, to Friday, July 31. It will still take place at 6:30 p.m. in the college’s Delamar Center on campus, Ross said.

 

“Our graduation ceremony to many people, including me, is the highlight of the year,” he said. “Making this change still allows it to happen while providing greater protection for everyone’s health and safety. This action is consistent with guidelines from the Centers for Disease Control and Gov. Roy Cooper that dramatically restrict the number of people who gather at public events now and in the near future.”

 

Ross says he is confident students, employees and the community will recognize the importance of rescheduling the event.

 

“I deeply appreciate the courage and optimism you are showing in this unusual time,” Ross wrote in a Sunday evening email to all students and employees. “The Coronavirus is a dangerous foe. By taking common sense precautions as we are doing as a college, however, we take action that will reduce our risk.”

 

He continued, “By continuing with our work, whether as students or college employees as we have done, we send a powerful message that we are determined as a team that we will get through this. We will indeed get through this. This too shall pass. In the meantime, please do not miss an opportunity to be compassionate to all you encounter.”

 

Ross says he continues to speak with local and state leaders by phone about the situation each day. He also says he is participating in numerous online meetings with PCC leaders and others to ensure college operations continue to run smoothly.

 

“We will prevail in the war against this virus,” he stated. “May you and your loved ones be blessed with safety and good health.”

 

 

Have a Question? Email Us!

 

 

March 31, 2020

Students are encouraged to stay in contact with their instructors. Also, Student Services staffers are available by email to respond to questions and concerns.

 

PCC employees’ email addresses are available here,

 

 

 


Coronavirus/COVID-19 News for PCC Students

 

 

March 31, 2020

Instruction for Pamlico Community College students is continuing online, and faculty members and Student Services officials are available to answer questions and respond to concerns by email, as needed.

 

     * Beginning Wednesday, March 18, all seated curriculum courses were transitioned to online-only instruction until further notice. Students are encouraged to stay in contact with their instructors by email.

 

     * Likewise, seminar offerings from the college’s Small Business Center are being offered online or are being postponed. SBC Director Mindy Moore is available for web meetings. Email mmoore@pamlicocc.edu.

 

     * All scheduled Continuing Education courses, including the Community Living class, have been suspended until further notice.

 

     * Most PCC employees are working from home.

 

     * The Commencement ceremony, originally scheduled for May 15, has been moved to Friday, July 31. It will still take place at 6:30 p.m. in the college’s Delamar Center.

 

“We took these steps to ensure our students and employees remain safe,” said PCC President Dr. Jim Ross. “We also wanted to make sure we continued to offer instruction for students so they can continue to progress. We believe these changes have enabled to accomplish these goals in a responsible manner.”

 

The president sent the following statement by email to students and employees March 14:

 

Good evening Pamlico Community College employees and students,

 

Governor Roy Cooper has issued an executive order closing all K-12 public schools in North Carolina beginning this Monday. The Governor’s executive order does not include community colleges or universities.

 

This e-mail is to let you know actions this week that Pamlico Community College is taking to respond to the Coronavirus while continuing to provide vitally important instruction to our students so educational progress is not halted.

 

If you are a student in any seated curriculum class on campus, your class is cancelled for this Monday and Tuesday. It will resume this Wednesday. At that time, it will be provided as an online class. It will continue to be provided online to you throughout this semester until further notice.

 

I deeply appreciate our instructors’ willingness to change formats from seated on-campus class instruction to online instruction. I am also deeply appreciative of the significant time they previously devoted to learning effective online instructional techniques and in preparing their course materials to be utilized online.

 

Because of their dedication to our students, we will be able beginning this Wednesday to transition all seated classes at our college to online offerings. This is an important step to allowing our students to continue to finish this semester in a way that reduces their risk of being exposed to this dangerous virus.

 

Only students currently in seated classes will face a change this week by not having class Monday and Tuesday. Those currently in online classes will have their classes scheduled this Monday and Tuesday and will not experience subsequent changes.

 

All employees of PCC should report to work Monday as normally scheduled. The college will continue to operate. We will, however, allow all employees who can perform their duties remotely to do so beginning this Tuesday until further notice. This will be done under the oversight of your supervisor and following guidelines that allow accountability.

 

We will have an all-employee meeting Monday at the Delamar Center at 2 PM to discuss this. I appreciate the Executive Committee members who have worked with me the past six weeks to prepare us to continue operations if a worst case scenario developed. I also appreciate the faculty and staff in the task force I appointed to help transition all curriculum seated classes to online to enable us to continue serving students so educational plans are not halted while allowing greater safety from the virus.

 

Thank you for all you do to make lives better as members of the PCC Family. May God bless you and your loved ones in the days and weeks to come.

 

Please stay safe,

 

Dr. Jim Ross

 

 

 


New Controller Keeps PCC’s Books Balanced

 

 

March 5, 2020

Karan Smith knows her way around the quiet, sometimes complex work of business, finance and accounting, but she also can make a joyful noise with the best of them.

 

The Indiana native is Pamlico Community College’s new Controller. Her work responsibilities include ensuring the college manages its money according to internal controls, proper protocols and state rules.

 

Outside of the office, however, Smith enjoys singing and is an active member of her church, the Word of God Christian Center in New Bern. There she serves as a deaconess and a youth leader, and is an active member of the church’s praise and worship team.

 

“I enjoy all of it,” Smith said with a smile.

 

The fourth of seven children, Smith grew up in Indiana and earned an associate’s degree in Business from Davenport University.

 

She left the Midwest about 10 years ago to be closer to family members who lived in New Bern. Smith began attending Word of God, where she met Willie Smith, and the two got married. They have nine grandchildren.

 

Smith joined the college’s Business Office on Feb. 10. In a short time, she has become a valuable member of the PCC staff.

 

“The Business Office is very excited about adding Karan Smith to our college family,” said PCC Chief Financial Officer Sherry Raby, who is Smith’s supervisor. “She continues to impress me as a woman with strong fiscal skills and a solid work ethic.”

 

Raby continued, “She has demonstrated a keen ability to learn some of the most complicated tasks associated with her job very quickly and accurately. I am confident that, over time, not only will she prove herself to be a valuable, effective and efficient part of the team, but that she will do so with the professionalism and positive attitude that is characteristic of Pamlico Community College.”

 

PCC President Dr. Jim Ross said he was pleased to welcome Smith to the college and was happy to hear she is adjusting well.

 

“I am confident Mrs. Smith will do a fantastic job for PCC,” he said. “Sherry Raby provides outstanding leadership for our college’s Business Office, and the staffers there are first class in every way. I feel certain Mrs. Smith will fit in nicely.”

 

For her part, Smith said she is happy to be at PCC and looks forward to ensuring the Business Office runs smoothly for PCC students, employees and vendors.

 

“I’m humbled to be a part of the team,” she said. “I believe I’m up for the challenge.”

 

 


Gretchen Steiger Named College’s New Registrar

 

 

March 2, 2020

Gretchen Steiger, who has been serving as Pamlico Community College’s Interim Registrar since September, will take on the post permanently. PCC President Dr. Jim Ross says Steiger’s appointment is effective immediately.

 

“Gretchen has done an outstanding job as the Interim Registrar the past six months,” the president said. “She has proven herself capable of excelling in this role.”

 

The PCC Registrar is responsible for keeping and evaluating student records as well as overseeing college course schedules and catalogs. Steiger says she is looking forward to the challenge.

 

“I’m very excited to learn and grow in my career as the new Registrar of Pamlico Community College,” she said. “This new role allows me to work alongside all faculty and staff of PCC to best serve the citizens of our community, and I am grateful to have that opportunity.”

 

She will report to Vice President of Student Services Jamie Gibbs, who said he was pleased she was selected for the permanent job.

 

“She’s done very well as the Interim Registrar, and I’m proud to have her as a member of the permanent team,” he said.

 

Steiger, 28, has been with the college since she was hired to be PCC’s Student Support and Engagement Specialist in October 2017. In that role, she coordinated student activities and helped match students with campus services available to them.

 

Steiger has lived in Pamlico County since she was 12. She is a 2009 graduate of Pamlico County High School and attended N.C. State University. She later graduated from East Carolina University with a degree in Business.

 

Steiger lives in Oriental with her two children.

 

 


Hungry Crowd Enjoys Great Oyster Revival

 

 

February 24, 2020

Perfect weather, a record-tying turnout and 25 bushels of Newport River oysters combined for a memorable 10th edition of the Great Oyster Revival and Chili Cookoff last Saturday at Pamlico Community College.

 

The popular PCC Foundation event drew 175 people to campus and raised hundreds of dollars for student scholarships and support.

 

“It’s a fun way to raise money, but it’s also important,” said PCC Foundation President Carla Byrnes, who explained the funds raised help to “bridge gaps” for students who might not qualify for other types of financial aid.

 

PCC President Jim Ross said, “This event is always one of the year’s highlights, and we are very thankful for everyone who came out for a fun time for a great cause. Many lives will be improved thanks to the generosity of our community.”

 

Oyster aficionados stood shoulder-to-shoulder outside the Johnson Building to shuck and eat all the oysters they could hold. The oysters came from local supplier Garland Fulcher Seafood, and cookers Jim Ragan, Chuck Forrest, Ricky Miller, Ryan Delcambre and Mickey Baker did an outstanding job keeping the tables filled with the briny delights.

 

Inside the Johnson Building, event participants sampled more than a dozen pots of chili entered in the cookoff. The entries were anonymous and were ranked by a vote of the event participants. Flavors ranged from beef, venison and bear to white beans, kidney beans and secret spices.

 

Melanie Stensrud of Charlotte won first place for her “Fox Hunt Chili” while Debbie Harrison of Oriental took home second place for her “White Bean Chili.” Both women received customized trophies, with Stensrud getting a $25 Food Lion gift card and Harrison receiving a $15 Food Lion gift card.

 

To commemorate the event’s 10th anniversary, 10 crisp $10 bills were given away in a random drawing. Later, Donna Pease of Arapahoe won the 50-50 drawing, taking home $167.

 

“One element making this event extra special was the music group Harbor Sounds,” said PCC Foundation Executive Director Michelle Noevere, the event’s key organizer. “Dixie, Asa, Paul and Dick captivated the audience with their unique blend of harmonies and musical styles – the bluegrass and folk, and oh, we heard some old Hank Williams covers there, too!”

 

Noevere continued, “As they like to say, they ‘support charities through music.’ They have performed free of charge for fundraisers since 1998. The Foundation would like to thank them very much for helping to make a difference in their little corner of the world.”

 

Not even the oyster shells went to waste. They were collected at the event by a representative of North Carolina Coastal Federation for ongoing living coastline restoration.

 

The Foundation wishes to thank Pearl Sponsors Gail Johnson, Jim and Michelle Krauss, Kellum Law Firm and Dr. Sherri Hicks of Oriental Village Veterinary Hospital for their support. The Foundation also salutes Briny Sponsors AlphaGraphics of New Bern and Robinson & Stith Insurance, as well as Chili Cookoff Sponsors Bayboro Pharmacy and Brantley’s Village Restaurant.

 

The Foundation thanks individuals and businesses that donated silent auction items, including Garland Fulcher Seafood, Nautical Wheelers and The New Village Brewery.

 

The Foundation recognizes the talented cooks who entered chili in the cookoff. Noevere also singled out Foundation board members Carla Byrnes, Stan Aeschleman, John Barlow, Wyatt Cutler, Gary Hardison and Debbie Harrison for their help and support. She also thanked Student Ambassador Brian Huertas and college employees who came out on Saturday in support of the college and the Foundation. They included George Willey, Jennifer Paul, Barbara Cayton, Mindy Moore, Sue Fore, Susan Adams, Michelle Egan and her daughter, Randi, and Sandy Wall.

 

“George Willey gets an extra-special hurrah for always giving 110 percent in his role as maintenance supervisor and for his help in putting the many logistical details, big and small, in place for this event,” Noevere said.

 

She added, “We thank everyone who came out to support the college and its mission of helping people improve their lives through higher education. This event has developed a loyal following, one that oyster and music lovers anticipate every year. We strive to make this a fun, memorable day for attendees who help us help our students reach their goals.”

 

For more information about the PCC Foundation, call 252-249-1851, ext. 3084.

 

 


Academic Excellence Nominees Announced

 

 

February 19, 2020

PCC students Samantha Armstrong and Noelle Baker are the nominees for this year’s Academic Excellence Award!

 

Armstrong, at left, is pursuing an Associate in Science degree. She lives in Grantsboro.

 

Baker, at right, also is working on an Associate in Science degree. She lives in Holly Ridge.

 

Each year, one student from each of the state’s 58 community colleges is selected to receive the Academic Excellence Award.

 

PCC’s recipient will be announced at Commencement in May. When named, she also will become the college’s Student of the Year.

 

The recipient will receive a plaque, a medallion, a letter of congratulations from the N.C. Community College System president and a $300 check.

 

 


Cristy Warner Takes On Career Center Duties

 

 

February 14, 2020

PCC Career Center Director Cristy Lewis Warner, center, recently met with PCC Vice President of Student Services Jamie Gibbs, left, and Reeshema Walker, manager of the NCWorks New Bern office, to discuss ways to provide a variety of career services in Pamlico County.

 

Warner assumed the Career Center duties earlier this year. Her title is now Counselor/Career Center Direc­tor.

 

She is still handling student reten­tion, but now oversees the Career Center’s services and the Workforce Innovation and Opportunity Act (WIOA) program. The center wants to connect job seekers with local employers.

 

“We put the ‘care’ in Career Services,” Warner said with a chuckle. “We want to help men and women secure great jobs and build their careers. Let us know how we can help you.”

 

Her new office is Brinson 409. For more information about the Career Center, contact Warner at cwarner@pamlicocc.edu.

 

 


PCC to Offer Forklift Training, OSHA Courses

 

 

February 14, 2020

Pamlico Community College soon will be offering a Forklift Training course and a series of OSHA safety courses to help men and women prepare for new jobs or become more valuable in their current positions.

 

Registration is now open for the one-day Forklift Training course, which is scheduled for Saturday, March 21, on campus.

 

Likewise, registration is open for both the OSHA 10 and OSHA 30 courses, which also will be offered in March.

 

Dates for OSHA 10 are March 17, 18 and 19. The class will meet from 4 to 8:15 p.m. on March 17 and then from 5 to 8:15 p.m. on March 18 and 19. Dates and times for the OSHA 30 course are still being finalized.

 

These courses are part of the college’s commitment to helping provide local men and women with the skills and knowledge that employers need.

 

“Both the Forklift Training course and the OSHA series are great additions to any person’s résumé,” said PCC Chair of Continuing Education and Technical Programs Lori Giles. “These courses have been developed in response to the needs of area employers, and they are designed to be completed in a short time.”

 

For his part, PCC President Dr. Jim Ross said the college’s new Continuing Education offerings build on PCC’s commitment to meeting the education and training needs of the community.

 

“We are pleased to offer courses to help community residents develop the skills they need for today’s workplaces,” he said. “These short-term training classes are ideal for working people who want to enhance their abilities and explore new career options.”

 

Ross continued, “Our college has dramatically expanded the number of vocational class offerings such as this for our community. It is important for our students and their family members to recognize it is just as honorable a career for those who work with their hands as it is for those who do desk work. Both are important. Our society needs more well-trained employees in the vocational fields to serve employers’ needs, and our college will continue to invest in equipment and programs to dramatically increase these courses as we did this year.”

 

Instructor Joe Flynn will teach PCC’s one-day Forklift Training course, which will meet from 8 a.m. to 4:30 p.m. Students will learn to safely operate a forklift by using the college’s new, propane-powered one that’s nearly identical to forklifts used in factories and warehouses throughout the country.

 

The course includes classroom instruction and hands-on learning. It costs $70 to enroll.

 

“This one-day training could lead to employment as a forklift technician or enhance your portfolio of job skills,” Giles said.

 

The OSHA 10 and OSHA 30 courses are great companion courses, she said. Instructor Zac Schnell will teach both courses, which include instruction in on-the-job safety.

 

The OSHA 10 course features 10 hours of instruction and can be completed in two days. Students who finish it will receive an OSHA 10 card. Cost to enroll is $70.

 

OSHA 30 takes 30 hours, or a minimum of four sessions, to complete. Completers will receive an OSHA 30 card. Cost to enroll is $125.

 

Giles said the college could customize a schedule of Forklift Training and OSHA courses for interested companies.

 

For more information the upcoming Forklift Training course or the OSHA courses, please call 252-249-1851, ext. 3013.

 

 

 


Two PCC Programs Offer Valentine’s Special

 

 

February 5, 2020

Pamlico Community College’s Cosmetology and Esthetics programs have an idea for how you can spoil your sweetie – or yourself – just in time for Valentine’s Day.

 

Students and instructors in the two programs once again are offering a special Valentine’s week package from Monday, Feb. 10, through Thursday, Feb. 13. Hours are 8:30 a.m. to 12:30 p.m.

 

For $16, your special someone (or yourself) will receive a 30-minute strawberry and chocolate facial plus a makeup application from Esthetics, as well as a shampoo/styling from Cosmetology.

 

“This sounds like a fun way for students in Cosmetology and Esthetics to work on their skills,” said PCC President Dr. Jim Ross. “This offer has been a big hit in the past. We encourage community residents who are looking for a Valentine’s treat to check out this special offer. We also would invite anyone interested in PCC’s Cosmetology or Esthetics programs to take advantage of this opportunity to see our students and instructors in action.”

 

Students and instructors from the two programs have teamed up to offer similar Valentine’s week packages in the past. They say it’s a great way for students in the two programs to apply what they’ve learned and for residents to treat themselves to something out of the ordinary.

 

The Cosmetology and Esthetics programs are located in the PCC Cosmetology Building off N.C. 55 (Main Street) in Bayboro.

 

Appointments are required. To make an appointment, please call PCC Instructors Shanna Lewis, Debi Fulcher or Christy Laney at 252-745-5537.

 

 

 


Gary Toler Receives President’s Award

 

 

January 31, 2020

Pamlico Community College Computer Technician Gary Toler doesn’t say a lot while he’s on the job, but his work ethic, helpful demeanor and attention to detail speak loud and clear.

 

The 62-year-old Craven County native is a go-to source for help with computer repairs, software bugs and other maddening technology-related issues.

 

Toler is quick to respond to calls for assistance, and he doesn’t talk down to less-experienced co-workers and students who are struggling with computer troubles.

 

For these reasons and more, Toler has been named the recipient of PCC’s President’s Award for the 2019-20 academic year. PCC President Dr. Jim Ross announced Toler’s selection at the college’s Christmas luncheon in December.

 

The president established the award to recognize PCC employees who are extraordinary examples of being positive, professional and productive. He said the award also highlights dedicated employees whose efforts might go unnoticed.

 

Toler is the fourth recipient of the President’s Award. He joins previous honorees Cameron Kishel, Pattie Leary and Herman Turnage.

 

“Gary Toler deserves special recognition for his efforts at the college,” Ross said. “He works extremely hard to ensure computers and related equipment operate as they should. Gary is tremendously responsive and reliable, and he does not shy away from challenging problems. He has a great attitude and demonstrates a spirit of cooperation with all departments at the college.”

 

The president added, “Gary is a true gentleman and a true professional. He is a role model for being positive, professional and productive. All of us are honored to have him as a colleague.”

 

Toler grew up in Craven County and graduated from New Bern High School in 1975. After high school, he went to work as a heavy equipment operator for the N.C. Forest Service, and later, in 1985, took a job at the Tredegar plastics factory in New Bern.

 

While there, Toler gained some experience working with computers, including those that ran production machines on the plant floor and those operating spreadsheet software in the factory’s business office.

 

“It was very interesting,” he said, adding that former colleague Steven Fulford helped to introduce him to computer technology at Tredegar and became a mentor.

 

Toler’s unlikely career in information technology really began when he lost his job in 2004. Tredegar shut down the New Bern plant, and Toler and many of his displaced co-workers became eligible to go back to school for job training.

 

He enrolled at Craven Community College in 2005 to study Computer Information Systems, but he wasn’t sure he was up to the challenge.

 

“I was very nervous,” Toler said. “I thought I would never be able to keep up with all these young people. But I found that wasn’t the case at all. Everybody was very supportive.”

 

He said his exposure to computers at Tredegar combined with helpful instructors made his transition back to school easier.

 

“It wasn’t entirely brand new,” Toler said.

 

He graduated with an Associate’s Degree in 2007 and applied for an open Computer Services job at Pamlico Community College. Toler got the job and remains at PCC today.

 

“I really like working here,” he said. “The people are very friendly. I feel like you’re actually helping people reach their goals.”

 

Toler added with a chuckle, “It’s much quieter than working in the plant.”

 

At PCC, he’s part of a four-person IT staff, which means he and his colleagues stay busy installing computers, repairing them and troubleshooting an array of technology issues that arise.

 

“We’re a small school, so you have to take on several hats,” Toler said, adding he takes great satisfaction figuring out the cause of a frustrating IT problem and then implementing a fix.

 

Chief Information Officer Scott Frazer, who has been Toler’s supervisor since he was hired, said he was happy that his colleague was chosen for the President’s Award.

 

“When Dr. Ross approached me to tell me he wanted Gary to be this year’s President’s Award recipient, I could not have been more pleased,” he said. “Gary is the type of hard-working, dedicated employee that looks to assist the folks that Computer Services serves without looking for personal recognition. Our president’s selection makes me proud to be a part of an organization that sees the value and contribution of everyone whose work and dedication make a difference.”

 

For his part, Toler said he was honored with the award, but characteristically had little else to say.

 

“It’s nice to be able to help people,” he said with a smile.

 

 

 


PCC Courses Give High Schooler a Great Start

 

 

January 24, 2020

Riley Callahan has used his time very wisely while in high school.

 

When the 17-year-old Pamlico County High School senior graduates later this year, he will take with him 50 hours of transferable college credit.

 

Those hours, which Callahan earned while taking N.C. Career & College Promise (CCP) courses offered by the community college, will give him a tremendous head start when he enrolls for the Fall 2020 semester at East Carolina University.

 

He will have essentially the same number of credit hours as a college sophomore, and he will have saved himself time – and his family a tremendous amount of money – as he begins his journey toward earning a bachelor’s degree in computer science.

 

“I knew I was going to college, so I figured I’d get a jump on it,” Callahan said during a recent interview at Pamlico Community College’s Bayboro Center. “I knew what I wanted to do.”

 

The CCP program enables motivated high school juniors and seniors an opportunity to take tuition-free college courses, which can help them get ahead in their studies and save their parents a lot of money in future college costs.

 

The credit hours earned by passing these courses can help students move faster in earning a two-year or four-year degree because they transfer to institutions in the University of North Carolina system and to many private colleges and universities.

 

That means real savings in time and in money for students and their families.

 

“North Carolina’s CCP program is a tremendous opportunity for high school students,” said PCC President Dr. Jim Ross. “Taking and passing the CCP courses we offer helps students dramatically move toward the goal of obtaining a college degree or a great career. It also can dramatically reduce the overall cost of a college education. There is no better bargain in higher education than free, transferable college credit.”

 

Callahan’s 50 hours of transferable college credit represent roughly a year and a half of college-level coursework. Earning the same number of credits at PCC without the CCP program would have cost him roughly $4,500 in tuition and fees. A year and a half of tuition and fees at ECU would run about $11,000, not including books, room and board.

 

A Bachelor of Science degree in Computer Science at ECU requires a minimum of 120 hours of college credit, according to the university website.

 

Callahan said his father, who is a PCC instructor, suggested he take the CCP courses. The younger Callahan said he was “a little nervous” at first about taking college courses, but settled in quickly.

 

“There’s definitely some rigor to it,” he said.

 

CCP courses are offered in both seated and online formats, and Callahan has taken both. He has earned credits in English, math, biology, humanities and other subjects.

 

Callahan said he encourages others to give the CCP program a look.

 

“I’d tell them to take advantage of these classes,” he said. “They’re free and they’ll get you a head start on your future. I hope this continues. It’s a great opportunity.”

 

PCC’s CCP courses are open to high school juniors and seniors at PCHS, Arapahoe Charter School, Pamlico Christian Academy and to home-schoolers.

 

For more information, contact Derek Godwin at PCC’s Bayboro Center by calling 252-745-7349 or by emailing dgodwin@pamlicocc.edu. For information about Pirate Promise, a co-admission program that allows interested students to apply to PCC and ECU simultaneously, contact Instructor Neil Callahan at 252-249-1851, ext. 3042.

 

 


You Still Have Time to Register at PCC!

 

 

January 13, 2020

There is still time for students to sign up for classes this semester at Pamlico Community College!

 

New and returning students can register for seated courses for the Spring 2020 semester as long as they sign up before the first day of class, which is Tuesday, Jan. 21.

 

Meanwhile, students who are interested in online courses can sign up until the first day of class for those web-based offerings, which is Monday, Jan. 27.

 

High school juniors and seniors who are interested in enrolling in tuition-free N.C. Career & College Promise courses can sign up for those classes Jan. 22 and 23 from 8 a.m. to 3 p.m. at the Bayboro Center.

 

“The college’s formal registration wrapped up last week, but new and returning students still have opportunities to register for classes this semester,” said PCC President Dr. Jim Ross. “We want to ensure we provide multiple opportunities for men and women to register for curriculum courses. All of us at PCC are committed to increasing the community’s access to degree, diploma and certificate programs, which enable men and women to improve their lives.”

 

New and returning students are encouraged to discuss their options with the college’s Student Services staff members this week. They can be reached at 252-249-1851, ext. 3001, by email at studentservices@pamlicocc.edu, or by visiting the Johnson Building on campus.

 

High school juniors and seniors – regardless of where they attend school – and their parents are encouraged to contact Derek Godwin at 252-745-7349 for more information about how courses offered through the Career & College Promise program can help students get ahead and save money.

 

PCC can help you get started on a great new career or can put you on your way to earning a bachelor’s degree at a fraction of the cost of university tuition. The college offers a wide range of seated and online courses, and PCC’s faculty members and staffers are dedicated to helping you succeed.

 

PCC features small class sizes, with a 9-to-1 student-to-faculty ratio. The college is also affordable, and financial aid is still available for those who qualify.

 

The college recently was named the No. 2 community college in America by SmartAsset, which used U.S. Department of Education data to compile its rankings. PCC also has been recognized by AccreditedSchoolsOnline.org for its online instruction.

 

“Regardless of whether you are a traditional student, a high schooler who is looking to get ahead in your studies or an adult learner who wants to complete an academic dream or investigate a possible career change, PCC has something to offer this semester,” Ross said. “We encourage everyone to explore their options for the new semester.”

 

For more information about registering at PCC, please call 252-249-1851, ext. 3001, or visit www.pamlicocc.edu on the web.

 

A link to the SmartAsset’s 2019 ranking is available at: https://smartasset.com/checking-account/best-community-colleges-in-america-2019.

 

 

 


Trustee’s Funeral Set for Sunday Afternoon

 

 

January 10, 2020

The Pamlico Community College family is saddened by the passing of Board of Trustees member Ernestine Mattocks, who died Wednesday, Jan. 8, at Duke University Hospital.

 

She was 73.

 

Her funeral will take place at 2 p.m. Sunday, Jan. 12, at the New Bern Eastern M.B. Association Headquarters in Grantsboro.

 

Here is a link to her obituary: https://localonlineobituaries.com/ArticObits/ObitsNew/Landing_Obituary.aspx?oid=160606&view=

 

2019

Coastal Region’s Only EDT Program is at PCC

 

 

December 17, 2019

Pamlico Community College’s two-year Electroneurodiagnostic Technology (EDT) program trains students to conduct sophisticated tests on the electrical waves in a patient’s brain and spine. Those tests can be critical in the diagnosis and treatment of seizures, strokes and other neurological problems, including dementia and ALS.

 

PCC has the only EDT program in the state’s coastal region. It is accredited by the Commission on Accreditation of Allied Health Education Programs (CAAHEP) and can be completed entirely online.

 

“Electroneurodiagnostic Technology is a unique specialty in the medical field because students have the option of going in several different directions after becoming an EEG technologist,” said PCC Instructor Ronda Rosenbalm.

 

She would know. Rosenbalm is a 2013 graduate of PCC’s program. After completing the program, she worked in the EDT field at positions in Jacksonville and Havelock, and then returned to the college in August 2018 to take over as the program’s instructor.

 

The EDT program’s material can be tough, but the college’s small class size and dedicated instructors can help make it manageable. As a former online student herself, Rosenbalm says she recognizes the challenges that distance education students face and works to accommodate them.

 

“Because our program is 100 percent online, our students are able to take care of their families, work full-time jobs and still complete the program successfully,” she said.

 

Students from several states are enrolled in the EDT program. That number is projected to grow as the demand for additional training for technologists grows.

 

“Some states are beginning to require that technologists be registered,” Rosenbalm said. “Once quite a few begin this requirement, I feel that the majority of the remaining states will follow suit. While there are several pathways to obtain a registry, graduation from an accredited program like ours at PCC is likely the most obtainable.”

 

EDT is one of the college’s premier programs and is poised for growth, said PCC President Dr. Jim Ross.

 

“We are proud to be one of only a handful of community colleges offering this unique program,” he said.

 

“Ronda Rosenbalm is a dedicated professional who brings tremendous experience to her role as instructor. I encourage men and women who have an interest in health care to contact her and see if EDT is a fit for them.”

 

Registration for the Spring 2020 semester is scheduled for Jan. 7 and 8, 2020, at the college. For more information about EDT, contact Rosenbalm at 252-249-1851, ext. 3043, or by email at rrosenbalm@pamlicocc.edu.

 

 
 

PCC Medical Assisting Program Leads to Jobs

 

 

December 9, 2019

Pamlico Community College’s Medical Assisting program prepares men and women to be multi-skilled health care professionals who are qualified to perform administrative, clinical and laboratory procedures in a variety of health care settings.

 

PCC Medical Assisting program graduates have gone on to rewarding careers in the region’s fast-growing health care sector.

 

Job opportunities are numerous, with employment of medical assistants nationally projected to grow by more than 200 percent between 2014 and 2024 as the health services industry expands to meet the needs of a growing and aging population.

 

“The demand for medical assistants is continually on the rise in primary care facilities,” said Instructor Tina Hardison, who is a 2015 graduate of the program. “The joys that I personally experienced practicing as a medical assistant coming to the aid of others has been extremely rewarding and life altering.”

 

PCC’s program offers a two-year Associate of Applied Science degree option and a three-semester Diploma option.

 

Upon successful completion of the program, students are eligible to take the CMA (AAMA) exam to become nationally certified in the field. This certification is essential for medical assistants seeking employment.

 

Program coursework, which includes anatomy & physiology, medical terminology and other classes, can be challenging, but PCC’s small class size and caring faculty help to make it manageable. The program also includes hands-on learning opportunities and clinical work off campus.

 

“Medical Assisting is a key program for our college and for this community,” said PCC President Dr. Jim Ross. “Instructor Tina Hardison has done an outstanding job preparing students for great careers in health care. She is a product of Pamlico Community College and loves to see students excel.”

 

Registration for the Spring 2020 semester is underway at PCC. Now is a great time for new and returning students to explore the Medical Assisting program and to see if it fits their aspirations for a better future.

 

“If you have a love for the medical field and the desire to make a difference in the lives of others, becoming a medical assistant is the perfect career for you,” Hardison said.

 

For more information about PCC’s Medical Assisting program, please contact Hardison at 252-249-1851, ext. 3044, or thardison@pamlicocc.edu.

 

For more information about registering at PCC, please contact Student Services at 252-249-1851, ext. 3001, or studentservices@pamlicocc.edu.

 

 
 

Pirate Promise Can Be a Great Option

 

 

December 4, 2019

East Carolina University Transfer Coach Cameron Burroughs, standing, discusses the Pirate Promise co-admission agreement with Pamlico Community College during a recent information session for prospective students in the Delamar Center.

 

Under the agreement, interested students apply to PCC and ECU simultaneously.

 

As long as a student commits to maintaining full-time status (12 credit hours) at PCC and meets other ECU admissions criteria, he or she is guaranteed admission to ECU after completing his or her Associate in Arts or Science at PCC, saving thousands of dollars in tuition and fees.

 

High school students participating in the Career & College Promise Program as College Transfer pathway students are eligible to apply as well. Pirate Promise students also get access to the ECU campus and its resources.

 

For more information about Pirate Promise, please contact PCC Instructor Neil Callahan at 252-249-1851, ext. 3042, or visit the transfer student link under the Student Portal on the PCC website’s home page.

 

 
 

PCC Community Living Class to Present Show

 

 

November 22, 2019

Members of the Pamlico Community College Community Living class will present their annual Christmas show on Wednesday, Dec. 4, at 10 a.m. at the Delamar Center.

 

This year’s show is titled “A Rocky and Roll Christmas Variety Program” and features class members and instructors.

 

The roughly 60-minute program will include festive, holiday-themed songs and other tunes, plus lots of dancing, some poetry and even a few surprises.

 

Admission is free.

 

“The show produced each year by the Community Living Class is always one of our most popular on-campus events,” said PCC President Dr. Jim Ross. “The upbeat show is an inspiring way to kick off the holiday season. It really is one of the highlights of the year.”

 

Last year’s show drew nearly 200 people, many of whom have been attending the annual event for years.

 

Both Community Living Instructor Betsy Bailey and assistant Darlene Willis said the Community Living students have been working on this year’s program for several weeks.

 

“They practice really hard all year on songs and dancing,” Bailey said. “Everyone is invited to come and enjoy the show.”

 

Class members include Ashley Aldridge, Tillman Ireland, Jerronica Johnson, Robinette Moore, Tony Speight, Sarah Vieregge, Michael Walsh and Patrick Yalden.

 

For more information, contact Betsy Bailey at bbailey@pamlicocc.edu.

 

 
 

Spring Registration Now Underway at PCC

 

 

November 18, 2019

New and returning students do not have to wait until January to sign up for the Spring 2020 semester at Pamlico Community College. Spring Registration is underway now!

 

PCC officials are encouraging new and returning students to go ahead and register for the new semester before the winter break in December.

 

The college still will conduct its usual Spring Registration period on Jan. 7 and 8, 2020, but students can avoid the new year’s rush and get their courses locked in now.

 

“All of us at Pamlico Community College want to make it as easy as possible for men and women to enroll at the college and get started on improving their lives and the lives of their family members,” said PCC President Dr. Jim Ross. “In that spirit, we are registering new and returning students now. By registering early, PCC students can ensure they get the courses they need and can avoid the busy January registration period.”

 

PCC features small class sizes, which means individualized attention for students. The college also features caring faculty members and staffers who want to see students succeed.

 

SmartAsset recently ranked the college the No. 2 community college in America for 2019, and PCC was an Aspen Prize Top 150 community college for 2019. The college also has been recognized as a Military Friendly School – Silver for 2019-20 and as a Military Friendly Spouse School.

 

PCC Counselor/Success Coach Cristy Lewis Warner and others have been contacting current students and encouraging them to take advantage of the early start of registration.

 

“It’s a great idea for students to get started now on the new semester,” she said. “There is more time to explore financial aid and other funding opportunities. Students also can get the courses they want. Now is the time to explore new and exciting opportunities at Pamlico Community College.”

 

For more information about the Spring 2020 registration period, contact PCC at 252-249-1851, ext. 3001, or studentservices@pamlicocc.edu.

 

For the courses available next semester, please visit http://www.pamlicocc.edu/resources-classschedules.php

 

 
 

Scholarship Donors, Recipients Honored

 

 

November 7, 2019

The Pamlico Community College Foundation saluted its 2019-20 scholarship recipients and thanked its generous donors for their support during the 11th annual Scholarship Recognition Ceremony held Wednesday, Nov. 6.

 

About 100 people turned out for the uplifting event, which took place in the college’s Delamar Center auditorium.

 

Because of the generosity of individual donors and organizations, the PCC Foundation was able to award more scholarships this year than ever before. In all, 84 students received scholarships valued at $52,200.

 

“What you’ve done makes our community and our world better,” PCC President Dr. Jim Ross said as he addressed donors during his opening remarks. “You have selected a cause that we believe in our hearts will make a great difference in our world.”

 

The president challenged the student recipients to dream big and to do great things with the opportunities they have been provided.

 

“We want to see you go out and change the world,” Ross said.

 

He saluted the college’s faculty, staff, leadership team and supporters, past and present, whose dedication and hard work over the years helped PCC achieve its 2019 ranking by SmartAsset as the No. 2 community college in America. Ross also recognized the members of the Scholarship Selection Committee as well as Janice Cox and Gail Johnson, the surviving spouses of two of his predecessors.

 

Student Matthew Bailey, who is studying Electrical Systems Technology, thanked donors for their support of scholarships, saying the financial assistance had made it possible for him to attend college without having to work a full-time job also.

 

“It’s been easier for me to go to school full time,” he said, adding that scholarships also have helped many of his classmates. “It allows the student body to have a much better chance of succeeding.”

 

Later in the ceremony, Vice President of Student Services Jamie Gibbs read the names of each scholarship recipient who was present and the names of each respective scholarship’s donor and/or presenter.

 

The students who received scholarships this year include:

 

Daniels/Holton/Muse Scholarship — Callie Polaski

 

Oriental Rotary Club Scholarship —Ariel Arnold and Callie Polaski

 

Dr. Cleve H. Cox Memorial Scholarship — Matthew Bailey

 

Paul H. Johnson GED Scholarship — Brian Huertas and Candy McKeown

 

State Employees’ Credit Union Scholarship — Chelsea Dietz

 

Gussie Siegel Memorial Scholarship — Madelyn Sparks

 

Rufus Brinson Memorial Scholarship — Madelyn Sparks

 

Geraldine Beveridge Memorial Scholarship — Ariel Arnold and Madelyn Sparks

 

Ned Delamar Scholarship — Jordan Baker and Kyle Zundel

 

PCC Foundation General Scholarship — Clarence Carawan, Natasha Coleman, Amanda Manning, Candy McKeown and Kimberly Williams

 

PCC Foundation Student Ambassador Scholarship — Matthew Bailey and Brian Huertas

 

Mt. Vernon Lodge #359 Masonic Scholarship Honoring Brother Douglas Taylor — Vanessa Gaskins

 

Wells Fargo Scholarship — Lashonda Harris

 

Thomas E. Minges Memorial/Pepsi Scholarship — Noelle Baker and Amanda Manning

 

PHJ Next Step Voucher — Danny Bell, Brian Huertas, Thomas J. Jones and Bobby Woolard

 

Golden LEAF Foundation Curriculum Scholarships — Brittany Armstrong, Ariel Arnold, Morghann Bennett, Cierra Brown, Tontrisa Brown, Chelsea Dietz, Verity Christenson, Ginger Flowers, Anita Foster, Alyssa Godwin, Katelyn Griffin, Mikaila Heck, David Huff, Danyelle Johnson, Tiarra Jones-Nickeson, Stephanie Knowles, Teresa Kreman, Shamillia Leary, Shatoria Leary, Aubrey Lewis, Jade McDaniels, Candy McKeown, Callie Polaski, Patrice Prichard, Stacy Rowe, Atiyah Sanders and Wendy Schultz

 

Golden LEAF Foundation Continuing Education Scholarships — Lauren Adams, Misol Alfonso, Shameckia Carter, Tamara Cintron, Summer Dail, Daja Edwards, Josefina Gomez, Cherita Green, Larry Henderson, Angelynn Hinnant, Wendy Honeycutt, Danyelle Johnson, Megan Jones, Misty Jones, Lillie Larkins, Passion London, Jessica Miller, Brandon Shackleford, Theressa Spivey, Connie Ward and Bari Wiley

 

PCC Foundation Continuing Education Scholarships — Lauren Adams, Zaynab Al-Amin, Cala Campen, Shameckia Carter, Tamara Cintron, Elizabeth Cuthrell, Summer Dail, Josefina Gomez, Spenser Goode, Cherita Green, Tanika Hamilton, Marcie Hawkins, Larry Henderson, Angelynn Hinnant, Megan Jones, Misty Jones, Lillie Larkins, Passion London, Jessica Miller, Ratreveyia Mustipher, Jasmine Selby, Brandon Shackleford, Theressa Spivey, Connie Ward and Bari Wiley

 

Continuing Education, State Employees’ Credit Union — Cala Campen, LeAnn Cline, Elizabeth Cuthrell, Yushika Gordon, Destiny Ham, Destiny Poole, Mayra Ramirez, Catherine Sanders, Derrick Sanders, Alissa Sarda, Silverette Swindell, Shyanne Toler, Jordane Tomczak, Linda Tomczak, Janice Tyler and Karen Vargas-Jovel

 

A reception sponsored by Gary’s Down East Seafood Restaurant followed the event.

 

For more information about the PCC Foundation and its efforts to fund student scholarships, please contact Executive Director Michelle Noevere at 252-249-1851, ext. 3084, or mnoevere@pamlicocc.edu.

 

Enrollment for the Spring 2020 is underway. For more information, call 252-249-1851, ext. 3001.

 

 
 

College Honored for Efforts to Hire Vets

 

 

November 4, 2019

Pamlico Community College recently was honored for its efforts to recruit, hire and maintain employees who are U.S. military veterans.

 

The college received the 2019 Medium Employer of the Year award from the Eastern Carolina Workforce Development Board, the NCWorks Career Center and the N.C. National Guard at a ceremony and luncheon held Oct. 30 in Jacksonville.

 

The award recognizes the college’s ongoing efforts to include veterans, National Guardsmen and Reservists in its workforce. Two other organizations – a Large Employer and a Small Employer – also were honored with Employer of the Year awards at the event.

 

“All of us at Pamlico Community College are extremely proud to receive this award,” said PCC President Dr. Jim Ross. “Veterans are terrific colleagues, and we are honored to have them as hard-working members of our team. As we approach Veterans Day, it’s important for everyone to salute the men and women who have served in our nation’s military and to do everything possible to help them be successful after they leave the armed services.”

 

The award’s criteria defined “Medium” employers as organizations that employee between 51-499 people. According to data compiled by the college, about one-eighth of the college’s employees as of Dec. 31, 2018, were veterans.

 

PCC colleagues Sherry Raby and Scott Frazer, both U.S. Marine Corps vets, accepted the award for the college at the Oct. 30 luncheon.

 

The 2019 Medium Employer of the Year award is further evidence of PCC’s ongoing efforts to make the college as friendly and supportive as possible to members of the military, veterans and their families.

 

The college has been recognized as a Military Friendly School – Silver for 2019-20 and as a Military Friendly Spouse School. The college also will be participating in the Pamlico County Veterans Day Parade in Bayboro on Nov. 9.

 

“We are proud of our efforts to make PCC a welcoming place for all of our military heroes,” Ross said.

 

“We thank the Eastern Carolina Workforce Development Board, the NCWorks Career Center and the N.C. National Guard for this honor.”

 

 
 

Discuss Your Transfer Options on November 7th

 

 

October 28, 2019

Come to the Johnson Building Mall on Thursday, Nov. 7, to discuss your transfer options with representatives of several area colleges and universities.

 

Representatives will be available from noon to 1:45 p.m. to answer questions. These colleges and universities are scheduled to participate: Barton College; East Carolina University; Elizabeth City State University; Fayetteville State University; Johnson & Wales University; N.C. A&T State University; N.C. State University; N.C. Wesleyan College; Old Dominion University; UNCW; and Western Carolina University.

 

This event is free and open to the public.

 

For more information, contact Eric Cedars at 252-249-1851, ext. 3032, or Cristy Lewis Warner at 252-249-1851, ext. 3014.

 

 
 

Health Care Students Get SECU Scholarships

 

 

October 24, 2019

Thirteen Continuing Education students who are enrolled in health care courses at Pamlico Community College recently received $500 Bridge to Career Cohort scholarships from the State Employees’ Credit Union (SECU) Foundation to help pay for their studies.

 

The scholarships, which were presented in a brief ceremony Oct. 21 at the college’s Delamar Center, will enable the students to complete career tracks that are designed to prepare them for good jobs in the area’s fast-growing health care sector.

 

Six students are using their scholarships for PCC’s Cardiac Monitor Technician course and its corresponding certification exam. They are Cala Beth Campen, Elizabeth Cuthrell, Destiny Alexis Ham, Catherine Alexis Sanders, Jordane Tomczak and Linda Tomczak.

 

Seven PCC students are using their scholarships to enroll in PCC’s Nurse Aide I course. Some then plan to take the college’s Nurse Aide II course, its Medication Aide course or both. They are Yushika Gordon, Destiny Poole, Derrick Sanders Jr., Silverette Denise Swindell, Janice Brinkley Tyler, Shyanne Star Toler and Karen M. Vargas-Jovel.

 

“We are grateful to the SECU Foundation for its generous support of these scholarships,” said PCC President Dr. Jim Ross. “The SECU Foundation has been a terrific partner with the college as we work to provide opportunities for men and women to improve their lives through higher education.”

 

According to the SECU Foundation, the Bridge to Career program is a statewide effort to help remove financial barriers for unemployed and underemployed college students who are seeking careers with sustainable wages in their local communities.

 

Administered by each college, the initiative focuses on assisting individuals with finding vocational and job placement opportunities through eligible training programs that lead to state-regulated or industry-recognized credentials.

 

Scholarship funding is applied to educational expenses and other expenditures associated with their program of study through a North Carolina community college workforce development program.

 

According to recent statistics, PCC awarded and encumbered more SECU Bridge to Career Cohort scholarships – 27 – than any other community college in North Carolina during this funding cycle.

 

Six of the PCC recipients were able to attend the recent ceremony. Dayla Dawson, vice president/city executive at SECU’s Grantsboro branch, and Mark Prescott, a Grantsboro man who serves on the local SECU Advisory Board, joined them at the event.

 

“SECU members share a deep commitment to education and the cooperative spirit of helping others,” Prescott said. “The SECU Bridge to Career program is an opportunity to help these students succeed, opening doors that will challenge and prepare them for a new career and future in today’s workplace. On behalf of SECU Foundation, it gives me great pleasure to offer our congratulations to the scholarship recipients.”

 

For more information about health care courses available in PCC’s Continuing Education division, please call 252-249-1851, ext. 3013 or 3015.

 

 
 

Pamlico Man Discovers Enjoyable Career Field

 

 

October 21, 2019

You might say Pamlico Community College student Matthew Bailey is “charging” into his new career in Electrical Systems Technology even before he has finished his degree.

 

The 19-year-old Pamlico County native is working part-time with Tryon Lighting and Electric of New Bern while he completes his coursework at the college.

 

The combination of hands-on classroom work and in-the-field experience has proven to Bailey that he made the correct choice when he enrolled in PCC’s Electrical Systems Technology program.

 

“I like being able to work with my hands,” he said. “I also like to see what I’ve accomplished at the end of the day. As I’ve gained experience, I’ve enjoyed it even more.”

 

PCC’s Electrical Systems Technology program trains students to install and repair electrical and electronics systems found in homes, businesses and industrial sites. Coursework, much of which is hands-on, includes topics such as AC/DC theory, basic wiring practices, programmable logic controllers, industrial motor controls, applications of the National Electric Code and other subjects.

 

Students can earn an Associate of Applied Science degree, and there are certificate options available.

 

Bailey was introduced to the program while he was a student at Pamlico County High School. He enrolled in college courses through the Career & College Promise (CCP) program and was pleased with what he found.

 

“I was impressed by their teaching abilities,” Bailey said.

 

After graduating from PCHS, he enrolled at PCC to continue working on his associate’s degree. Bailey has worked as an electrician’s apprentice during the summer, and he’s anxious to learn more about opportunities available in the career field.

 

Electricians can earn good wages. According to the U.S. Bureau of Labor Statistics, the median annual wage for electricians was about $54,000 in May 2017. Electricians who worked in government and manufacturing jobs earned a median wage of $60,570 and $58,470, respectively.

 

There also are opportunities for skilled electricians to open and operate their own businesses.

 

Unlike many people, Bailey is not afraid to work around electricity.

 

 “As long as you respect what you’re working with, you’ll be fine,” he said with a smile. “It’s hard work, but it’s rewarding.”

 

Despite his busy schedule, Bailey has found time to be active as a student. He serves as one of the college’s student ambassadors, working as a PCC representative at college-related events on and off campus.

 

PCC President Dr. Jim Ross said Bailey is a wonderful example of someone who, with the college’s help, found a career path at a young age.

 

“The CCP program is a fantastic way for high school juniors and seniors to explore career pathways,” he said. “I’m pleased to see students take advantage of these opportunities and begin working in career fields they enjoy at a young age. All of us at PCC are proud of Matthew Bailey and wish him well.”

 

PCC has invested in its Electrical Systems Technology program in recent months. The college purchased state-of-the-art training equipment, including machines to teach students how to work with programmable logic controllers, motors and controls. The program’s lab also is equipped with a three-dimensional printer and a robotic arm.

 

Larry Monk, a 2012 PCC Electrical Systems Technology graduate, is the program’s instructor. For more information about PCC’s Electrical Systems Technology program, contact Monk at lmonk@pamlicocc.edu or 252-249-1851, ext. 3029.

 

Registration for the Spring 2020 semester will begin Nov. 12, so contact PCC today!

 

 
 

PCC Helps Students Get Ready For 2020

 

 

October 10, 2019

Pamlico Community College wants to help new and returning students get ready for the Spring 2020 semester and beyond, even if some of them choose to attend college elsewhere.

 

First, the college’s Student Services division will be participating in the statewide FAFSA Day on Saturday, Oct. 26, from 9 a.m. to noon. On that day, PCC staffers will be available to help students and their families complete the Free Application for Federal Student Aid (FAFSA) form, which is a critical step in the financial aid process.

 

Second, the college will begin registering new and returning students for the Spring 2020 semester on Tuesday, Nov. 12. By registering early, PCC students can ensure they get the courses they need and can avoid the busy January registration period.

 

Both FAFSA Day and the Nov. 12 launch of Spring Registration are part of PCC’s ongoing efforts to make signing up for classes and paying for college easier and more convenient.

 

“All of us at Pamlico Community College want to make it as easy as possible for men and women to come to college and get started on improving their lives,” said PCC President Dr. Jim Ross. “FAFSA Day will help new and returning students start the financial aid process, and the early registration period will give students the opportunity to secure their class schedules for the new semester. It’s never too early to begin.”

 

The Oct. 26 FAFSA Day at PCC will be open to students who plan to attend college in the Spring or next Fall, regardless of whether they plan to attend Pamlico Community College, said PCC Director of Financial Aid Meredith Beeman.

 

“This is something we do to help our neighbors start the financial aid process, whether they decide to enroll here or elsewhere,” she said. “Completing the FAFSA is essential for all college and university students because it gives schools a baseline to award financial aid.”

 

Students and their families are encouraged to complete the FAFSA, even if they don’t believe they will qualify for federal Pell Grants, Beeman said.

 

“The FAFSA form helps PCC and other institutions determine a student’s need so they can match them with possible scholarships or other federal or state financial aid options,” she said. “Even if students are not eligible for federal grants, eligibility for state and institutional grants and scholarships are often determined by the student’s FAFSA results. For students who plan to attend larger schools, the loan packages offered at those places are also developed from the results of the FAFSA.”

 

Students and their families who take part in FAFSA Day should bring their 2018 tax returns and 2018 W-2 forms. Information from those documents is used to complete the online FAFSA form, Beeman said.

 

About 80 percent of PCC students receive some type of financial aid.

 

After new and returning students get the financial aid process started, they can look forward to the start of the Spring 2020 registration period at PCC, which is set for Tuesday, Nov. 12. PCC Counselor/Success Coach Cristy Lewis Warner encourages current and incoming students to take advantage of the early start of registration.

 

“January is an awesome time to make that change you want to make and create the life you desire,” she said. “You can get ready for January now. Let us help you plan now to make that dream a reality for you in 2020. PCC staffers will be here to walk you along the path to a brighter future for you and your family.”

 

For more information about FAFSA Day and financial aid, contact Beeman at 252-249-1851, ext. 3026, or mbeeman@pamlicocc.edu.

 

For more information about the Nov. 12 launch of the Spring 2020 registration period, contact Warner at 252-249-1851, ext. 3014, or cwarner@pamlicocc.edu.

 

 
 

Seats Still Available in Phlebotomy Class

 

 

October 7, 2019

There is still time to register for Pamlico Community College’s Phlebotomy Technician course, but you need to act quickly!

 

The course starts Tuesday, Oct. 29, and will run until May 14, 2020. Classes will meet Tuesdays and Thursdays from 9 a.m. to 2:30 p.m.

 

The Phlebotomy Technician course, which will be offered through PCC’s Continuing Education division, will train students in the proper techniques for collecting blood for use in diagnostic testing.

 

Students also will study ethics, legalities, medical terminology, safety, patient relations and other topics. Those who complete the course will qualify to apply for national certification.

 

“Phlebotomy is one of our most requested programs,” said Lori Giles, PCC’s chair of Continuing Education and Technical programs. “We are extremely pleased to be able to offer this course, which can lead to fantastic employment opportunities in our area. In fact, there are a variety of job opportunities in different settings available for course graduates.”

 

The demand for trained phlebotomists is expected to grow in the coming years. According to the federal Bureau of Labor Statistics, phlebotomist employment is projected to grow 23 percent between now and 2028, which is much faster than average for all occupations.

 

PCC’s Continuing Education division offers a wide range of short-term training programs for jobs in the fast-growing health care field. Other course offerings include Nurse Aide I and II, Medication Aide, Cardiac Monitor Technician and Pharmacy Technician.

 

“The upcoming Phlebotomy Technician course is a wonderful example of a short-term program that can lead to a great new career,” said PCC President Dr. Jim Ross. “PCC is committed to providing even greater service to our community in many ways, including with more short-term Continuing Education programs, to make lives better in Pamlico County. I encourage anyone who is interested to contact PCC today.”

 

Call Pamlico Community College’s Continuing Education division at 252-249-1851, ext. 3013, for more information or to register!

 

 
 

Foundation Boat Gets New Name, New Owner

 

 

September 30, 2019

A 17-foot-long wooden skiff formerly owned by the Pamlico Community College Foundation now has a new owner, a new mission and a new name.

 

The boat, built by renowned Carteret County boat builder Heber Guthrie, has been turned over to the North Carolina Coastal Heritage Association, which plans to use the vessel at festivals and events to promote Eastern North Carolina’s nautical history and heritage.

 

The boat will be named the “Carolyn,” in memory of Carolyn Broughton Casey of Minnesott Beach, a retired PCC English and Humanities instructor and Coastal Heritage Association member who died Sept. 14 at age 72. Carolyn Casey was the wife of Ben Casey, a former PCC employee and active member of the organization.

 

“It is entirely appropriate that this beautiful, hand-built skiff be turned over to the Coastal Heritage Association for its important work to preserve the area’s nautical history,” said PCC President Dr. Jim Ross, who supported the Foundation’s decision. “All of us at PCC are especially pleased the boat will be named in memory of Carolyn Casey, who was a tremendously positive influence on students, our college and our community.”

 

The formal transfer of the boat took place Sunday. The skiff joins the Coastal Heritage Association’s existing fleet, which includes the “Frances Mae,” a 22-foot Core Sound rack-of-the-eye work boat also built by Guthrie, and a small sailboat donated by the N.C. Maritime Museum in Beaufort.

 

Guthrie built the skiff in two days during the 2018 Oriental Rotary Club In-Water Boat Show using the centuries-old “rack of the eye” method, which does not rely on written plans, schematic drawings or blueprints.

 

The club had raffled the boat off during the show, and the winner graciously donated it back to the Rotary. In July 2018, the Rotary Club donated the boat to the PCC Foundation.

 

Last week, Foundation Executive Director Michelle Noevere and Foundation board members came up with the idea of turning over the skiff to the Coastal Heritage Association for its work. They also suggested the boat be named in memory of Carolyn Casey.

 

Noevere said the skiff is structurally complete, but still needs some sanding and the application of marine coatings. Now that the boat formally belongs to the Coastal Heritage Association, Guthrie and other organization members will be able to finish that work so it can be ready for display, she said.

 

“The boat will carry the insignia of the Coastal Heritage Association as well as the Pamlico Community College Foundation,” Noevere said. “This will provide a broad exposure of the mission of the college to a large audience of both young people in public schools and older adults.”

 

Sam Myers, director of the boat show, said he and the Rotarians were pleased the boat was with the Coastal Heritage Association and Guthrie, the skiff’s builder.

 

Keith Bruno, president of the Coastal Heritage Association, welcomed the donation of the skiff. He said naming it in memory of Carolyn Casey was the right thing to do.

 

“Boats and women are notoriously linked together. Both bring immeasurable joy and then, upon their demise, deep sorrow,” he said. “Their ability to take on the storms of life are valued and revered. Both keep their people safe while allowing for new adventures and past memories. The human Carolyn taught, nurtured and supported her people in the past. Carolyn’s wooden namesake will do the same for future generations, while inspiring great memories of generations that have passed.”

 

Bruno added: “What a fine woman tried to do in life will continue on in her memory as she passes from a driving force to a memorable spirit. Thanks to the Pamlico Community College for making this happen.”

 

For his part, Ben Casey said he was humbled by the decision to name the boat in memory of his wife.

 

“Over the last few years, Carolyn worked so hard for Coastal Heritage Association projects just like she did for students at the college,” he said. “Losing her has been the greatest trauma of my life, but as it was recently pointed out to me, no one dies as long as their memory is alive. I can’t thank everyone enough for this gesture that helps keep her memory alive.”

 

For more information about the Pamlico Community College Foundation, contact Noevere at 252-249-1851, ext. 3084, or mnoevere@pamlicocc.edu.

 

 
 

PCC Raises Flag for National POW/MIA Day

 

 

September 23, 2019

Pamlico Community College last week took a step to recognize the huge sacrifices many families have made in defense of the United States.

 

The college raised the familiar black POW/MIA flag Friday at its Grantsboro campus in honor of National POW/MIA Recognition Day.

 

Each year, the third Friday in September is set aside to honor America’s prisoners of war and those missing in action.

 

As flag etiquette dictates, the small flag flew directly under the American flag on a flagpole in front of the Johnson Building. A slight, but persistent late summer breeze made the banners visible to everyone who passed by the college on N.C. 306.

 

“It was our honor to fly the POW/MIA flag to honor the important occasion,” said PCC President Dr. Jim Ross. “All of us should remember the sacrifices that men and women in uniform and their families have made to preserve the freedoms we enjoy in America.”

Area resident Ann Coppage provided the flag for the college to fly.

 

 
 

Mother-Daughter Duo Thanks PCCF Donors

 

 

September 16, 2019

Mothers and their teenage daughters don’t always agree on everything, but Ronda Rosenbalm and her daughter, Jordan Baker, do agree on this: Pamlico Community College is a great place to find your passion and get started on improving your life.

 

They also agree that financial help from the Pamlico Community College Foundation is critical to helping people like them reach their educational goals.

 

Rosenbalm, 42, is a 2013 graduate of PCC who returned to the college last year to become the instructor in the college’s Electroneurodiagnostic Technology (EDT) program.

 

Baker, who graduated from Pamlico County High School in June, followed in her mother’s footsteps, enrolling at PCC. The 18-year-old plans to complete her first two years of college at Pamlico, and then transfer to East Carolina University and become a school teacher through the Partnership East program.

 

The women were the featured speakers at the PCC Foundation’s Aug. 30 fundraiser at New Village Brewery & Taproom in Oriental. Rosenbalm and Baker told the roughly 150 attendees that their support really does help people chase their dreams and improve their circumstances.

 

“Ronda Rosenbalm and Jordan Baker demonstrate PCC’s legacy of helping generations of local men and women improve their lives through higher education,” said PCC President Dr. Jim Ross. “Their experiences also show the critical role that private donors have in easing the financial burden for our students.”

 

Rosenbalm grew up in Pamlico County and graduated from Pamlico County High School in 1995. She enrolled in the PCC Cosmetology program and completed it, but decided she didn’t want to work in that field.

 

Rosenbalm later took a job as a teacher’s assistant and bus driver at Arapahoe Charter School. It was there she discovered both a love for education and a desire to improve her career prospects.

 

After discussing PCC’s EDT program with her sister, a program graduate, Rosenbalm enrolled at the college in 2011. The EDT material was tough, and going to school as an online student while still working at the charter school was a challenge, she said.

 

However, Rosenbalm persisted, completed her degree and began her new career.

 

“With many tears shed and the help of my family, a great instructor and financial aid, I completed my associate’s degree in Electroneurodiagnostic Technology,” Rosenbalm told the crowd. “Without financial assistance, this would have never been an option.”

 

After working in the field for five years, she returned to PCC to become the EDT instructor. Rosenbalm is currently pursuing her bachelor’s degree through a program with UNC-Chapel Hill and UNC-Charlotte.

 

For her part, Baker said she was inspired to pursue a college degree after watching her mother’s struggles and perseverance.

 

“I’ve always known I wanted to go to college,” she said. “I’ve seen the importance of college through my mother. After years of struggling, she decided to go back to school to get her associate’s degree in Electroneurodiagnostic Technology. We were extremely proud of her! I saw her juggle a full-time job, children and college. After she found a job with her brand-new degree, we were so much better off financially.”

 

Baker wants to become an elementary school teacher. Attending PCC for her first two years and transferring to ECU to complete her bachelor’s degree is the way to go, she said.

 

“I believe that my calling is to teach, and Pamlico is going to help me achieve my goals,” Baker said. “I chose to start with community college mainly because it’s smarter financially. Also, research says that students who start with a two-year are more successful than those who go straight into a four-year.”

 

The women said financial assistance from the PCC Foundation was a tremendous help in their respective academic journeys.

 

“If I can choose one thing for you to take away from what I’ve said here tonight, I want you to know and remember how much of a difference your donations to the Foundation have made in not only my life, but the lives of my children – because Mama has a better job thanks to higher education,” Rosenbalm said. “Now that I’m an instructor, the differences that were made in my life are being manifested in the lives of my students. Without donors like you, I wouldn’t be standing here tonight.”

 

Baker said the scholarships she and others receive through the PCC Foundation have lessened the financial pressures on local families.

 

“Thanks to the donors behind these scholarships, we don’t have to struggle,” she said. “I know many of my friends who went straight to a four-year will graduate with student loans. I don’t have to, because Pamlico Community College has been so supportive already. Again, thank you from the deepest part of my heart for your support as a donor. Whether you realize it or not, you’re changing lives.”

 

For more information about the PCC Foundation, contact Executive Director Michelle Noevere at 252-249-1851, ext. 3084, or email mnoevere@pamlicocc.edu.

 

 
 

PCC Explores Adding a Nursing Program

 

 

September 9, 2019

Pamlico Community College leaders are engaging in a multi-pronged process to explore adding an Associate’s Degree in Nursing (ADN) program, and local residents can play a critical role in the effort.

 

“I believe adding a high-quality Nursing program would be a transformative addition for Pamlico Community College,” said PCC President Dr. Jim Ross, “and most importantly would be a transformative addition for the citizens throughout Pamlico County.”

 

Ross has been a leader in envisioning the creation of a Nursing program for PCC because of the huge positive impact this could have on the lives of students and their families in Pamlico County and because of the impact their work in the medical field would have in helping others.

 

The PCC Board of Trustees previously approved Ross’ request for the college to proceed with the steps necessary to assess and pursue the numerous steps for this potential new program.

 

“It is an ambitious project which requires an extensive and lengthy evaluation and approval process from various layers of outside groups,” he said.

 

An important current step in this process is documenting community need and support for it to provide in a potential application package. To achieve this, the college has created a short online poll to gauge the community’s interest in a Nursing program and the demand for it from potential students and their families.

 

Community residents are invited to take part in the free online survey, which is available at https://www.surveymonkey.com/r/communitypcc. Participants will be entered into a raffle for a $50 gift card.

 

Data from the online survey is an essential piece of the decision-making process, said Ross.

 

“That’s why we’re encouraging community residents to go online and offer their honest opinions about this idea,” he said.

 

Associate Degree Nursing is one of the premier programs offered by community colleges in North Carolina. Graduates of ADN programs who pass the state board exams go on to good-paying jobs in the fast-growing health care sector.

 

However, because of equipment costs and the need for highly qualified faculty members, a Nursing program can be an expensive endeavor for the state’s community colleges, particularly smaller ones.

 

“Before we take on this challenge, we want to be sure there is a demand for a Nursing program and the community support for it,” Ross said. “There are many important state and local requirements we’ll have to meet in order to successfully launch a Nursing program, so we’re being very deliberate in our decision-making process.”

 

The online survey for community residents is short and can be completed in just a few minutes. To encourage participation, PCC has posted the online link on the college’s homepage and has shared it on both Facebook and Twitter.

 

Some prospective students have greeted the idea with enthusiasm. One woman posted on Facebook that the answer to whether PCC should add Nursing was “a million times yes!”

 

Another Facebook poster wrote, “Yes! I would quickly change majors!” A third stated she had completed PCC’s popular Nurse Aide training and would welcome the opportunity to become a nurse close to home.

 

“Love the school, the people, and would be so much easier living in Pamlico County,” the post states.

 

Ross said the college wants to be responsive to the community’s needs. If a Nursing program is not the correct move at this time, PCC will look at other opportunities, including other Allied Health offerings, he said.

 

“Higher education is a quickly changing field, and we must be responsive to the evolving needs of our community,” Ross said. “Nursing would be a wonderful addition to our college. Others have suggested we should explore a different program offering. To help us make the best decision possible, we want the community’s honest input, so I would encourage everyone to take the survey.”

 

 
 

PCC Will Be Closed Sept. 4, 5 and 6 Due to Hurricane Dorian

 

 

September 3, 2019

Pamlico Community College to close Wednesday, Thursday and Friday (Sept. 4-6) because of the anticipated effects of Hurricane Dorian

 

Pamlico Community College will be closed Wednesday, Thursday and Friday, Sept. 4, 5 and 6, because of the anticipated effects of Hurricane Dorian.

 

No decision has been made about next week’s operating schedule. PCC officials will evaluate the storm’s impacts and will announce a decision about next week’s schedule at a later time.

 

 
 

PCC

 

 

August 26, 2019

Pamlico Community College recently received the kind of news that any one of its students would love to hear: You passed an extremely important exam!

 

PCC officials were notified earlier this summer that the college’s accrediting body, the Southern Association of Colleges and Schools Commission on Colleges (SACSCOC), had concluded its review of PCC’s Fifth-Year Interim Report and had handed down no warnings or sanctions.

 

“Our college has achieved many great successes in recent years, including national recognition as being among America’s best community colleges, but none of this would have mattered had we run into difficulties with our accrediting body,” said PCC President Dr. Jim Ross. “The results of this report are something to celebrate and a wonderful example of our strong teamwork at PCC. Through the diligence of many talented and dedicated people across every department, we were able to demonstrate the outstanding quality of the education offered here.”

 

PCC produced its Fifth-Year Interim Report after comprehensively reviewing everything from its policies, procedures and finances to its educational outcomes, faculty credentials and condition of its physical plant to ensure compliance with SACSCOC standards.

 

PCC’s Director of Institutional Effectiveness Rebecca Pesko led the exhaustive effort to compile the information and supporting documentation and to deliver the written report to SACSCOC. She said the experience gave her a renewed appreciation of the quality of the college’s work.

 

“I really enjoyed seeing the connection between all the many student opportunities we offer both on and off campus to the assessment and accreditation process,” Pesko said. “The purpose of accreditation is to ensure quality programming for our students, and because of the consistent efforts of both faculty and staff, we were able to provide strong evidence of our compliance.”

 

PCC submitted the Fifth-Year Interim Report in August 2018. After its initial review of the college’s report, SACSCOC requested some additional information on PCC’s educational services at Pamlico Correctional Institution and its work with the Pamlico County Schools. After PCC submitted the additional information, SACSCOC gave the college a clean bill of health with no findings, warnings or sanctions.

 

“This is a tremendous success for our overall college,” Ross said. “I especially thank Rebecca Pesko for her amazing work on this project. She blended the correct mixture of persistence, hard work, interpersonal communications and detail-oriented oversight to bring the elite level of success we have achieved. I also extend profound appreciation to each administrator, faculty member and staffer who worked to provide the required documentation for this tremendous, and ultimately successful, undertaking.”

 

The extremely positive evaluation means PCC will remain fully accredited by SACSCOC until its scheduled 10-year review in 2023.

More importantly, it means the transfer credits earned by PCC students will continue to be accepted at other colleges and universities. It also means PCC students will remain eligible to receive federal financial aid.

 

 
 

Families Merge PCC Scholarship Funds

 

 

August 26, 2019

Representatives of three families who endowed memorial scholarships through the Pamlico Community College Foundation recently agreed to merge their respective funds into one so they could have a greater impact on PCC students’ academic careers.

 

The three funds – the Jennifer Daniels Fund, the James Holton Fund and the Louise Muse Fund – have been combined to create the Daniels-Holton-Muse Fund, which will be used to award scholarships to PCC students in the years ahead.

 

Jennifer Daniels was a PCC student who was killed in a motor vehicle accident on her way to class. James Holton was a former PCC trustee and board chair, as was Louise Muse.

 

After agreeing to merge their funds, family representatives met to sign the appropriate paperwork and to discuss the criteria for recipients of the new scholarship.

 

Pictured above, from left, are: PCC President Dr. Jim Ross; PCC Director of Financial Aid Meredith Beeman; Jim Holton, son of the late James Holton; Julia Spencer, niece of the late Louise Muse; Foundation Executive Director Michelle Noevere; and PCC Vice President of Student Services Jamie Gibbs. Not pictured is a representative of the Daniels family.

 

The PCC Foundation was formed in 1985 to support the mission of the college by raising funds for student and campus support. For more information about the PCC Foundation, please call 252-249-1851, ext. 3084.

 

 
 

High Schoolers Can Register Aug. 26-27

 

 

August 15, 2019

High school juniors and seniors are eligible to take tuition-free college courses offered by Pamlico Community College, thanks to the popular N.C. Career & College Promise (CCP) program.

 

The credits that high schoolers earn by passing the tuition-free courses can be applied to an Associate in Arts degree or Associate in Science degree and transfer to all public colleges and universities in North Carolina. Many of the state’s private colleges and universities accept the transfer credits, too.

 

Taking college-level courses while in high school helps qualified students get ahead in their studies and save money. The courses are open to high school juniors and seniors who attend Pamlico County High School, Arapahoe Charter School, Pamlico Christian Academy or a home school.

 

CCP registration is scheduled for Monday and Tuesday, Aug. 26 and 27, from 8 a.m. to 4 p.m. at PCC’s Bayboro Center, which is located next door to PCHS.

 

“There’s not a better deal in higher education today than tuition-free, transferrable college courses from one of America’s most highly ranked community colleges,” said PCC President Dr. Jim Ross. “The Career & College Promise program is a fantastic opportunity for motivated juniors and seniors to get ahead in their studies and save money. I strongly encourage high school juniors and seniors and their parents to check out the program and see how it could help them.”

 

There are two Career & College Promise pathways:

 

• College Transfer Pathway (CTP) requires the completion of at least 30 semester hours of transfer courses including English and mathematics.

 

• Career and Technical Education Pathway (CTE) leads to a certificate or diploma aligned with a high school career cluster.

 

Derek Godwin, PCC’s Director of CCP program, can answer specific questions about course selections and programs. Contact him at 252-745-7349 or at dgodwin@pamlicocc.edu. Classes begin Aug. 28.

 

“All of us at Pamlico Community College are proud of the college’s participation in the CCP program,” Ross said. “These courses offer young people a head start toward securing a great college education.”

 

 
 

Get Cooking With PCC Culinary Course!

 

 

August 9, 2019

Pamlico Community College wants to help you learn your way around the kitchen so you can be prepared for a great career in the food service industry.

 

Beginning in September, the college will offer a culinary course titled “Essential Skills – Get Ready to Work in the Food Industry” to train men and women the basics of food preparation, baking, kitchen protocol and food safety.

 

Participants also will learn knife skills, cooking terminology and the proper ways to use kitchen equipment.

 

Through lessons and hands-on experiences, students will gain the knowledge and self-assurance they’ll need to thrive in a fast-paced work environment.

 

“We want to give someone the tools to feel confident to pursue a job in the food industry,” said Rod Vilches, an experienced chef who will be teaching the course with fellow chef Andrew Rochlus. “This class will qualify someone to be more confident.”

 

Vilches is a native of Chile who currently serves as director of dining at YMCA Camp Seafarer and Camp Sea Gull in Pamlico County. He grew up watching his grandmother, who had Italian heritage, prepare delicious dishes and baked goods.

 

Vilches went on to graduate from culinary school in Chile. He has worked at restaurants and commercial food operations in the United States since 2001.

 

Rochlus, who works as senior chef manager at Camp Seafarer, grew up in Carteret County. When he was young, food played a prominent role in his family life, he said, recounting stories about helping his mother prepare huge family meals.

 

Rochlus graduated from Le Cordon Bleu College of Culinary Arts in Las Vegas and has worked in kitchens and restaurants across North Carolina since 2010.

 

The men say their PCC course is perfect for anyone who is interested in learning the culinary fundamentals, regardless of their prior experience.

 

“We’re starting at the basics,” Rochlus said. “You don’t have to know which side of the saucepan to cook on. That’s what we’re here for.”

 

Vilches said students who complete the course would become qualified to apply for jobs in commercial kitchens throughout the area, including at Camps Seafarer and Sea Gull.

 

“We are very excited about this course offering here at Pamlico,” said Lori Giles, the college’s chair of Continuing Education and Technical Programs. “We are extremely fortunate to have two experienced chefs on board to teach this course.”

 

PCC President Dr. Jim Ross encouraged men and women who might be interested in a culinary career to give the PCC course a look.

 

“We’re very pleased to offer this option for adult learners,” he said. “The food service industry is an important part of the local economy, and there are lots of great opportunities for people who enjoy working with food to find an exciting career.”

 

The course will begin Sept. 10 and will run until Dec. 10. The course fee is $180.

 

For more information or to register, please call the college at 252-249-1851, ext. 3013.

 

 
 

Pamlico Community College Receives National

Recognition for Excellence

 

 

August 5, 2019

Pamlico Community College has been notified that it is now nationally ranked as the second-best community college in America. This is an improvement over this past year when the college was rated the nation’s third-best community college. Pamlico Community College is the only community college in America to be rated one of the nation’s top three two years in a row.

 

SmartAsset, a New York-based personal finance technology company, utilized data from the U.S. Department of Education from 796 community colleges representing every state across America. The company reviewed the colleges on their graduation/transfer rates, student-to-teacher ratios and cost to compile its rankings.

 

PCC received outstanding scores for the graduation/transfer rate of its students of 69 percent; its excellent student-instructor ratio of 9-to-1; and its extremely low cost and affordability, according to SmartAsset.

 

PCC achieved an exceptionally high graduation/transfer rate more than 60% higher than the national average. SmartAsset stated the following: “Using 2017-2018 school year data, we found that from last year, when they ranked third, their graduation and transfer rate increased by almost 8%. For the 2016-2017 school year, 64% of students graduated or transferred to a four-year university. For 2017-2018, 69% of students graduated or transferred…”

 

PCC President Dr. Jim Ross said he is thrilled and humbled the college is now recognized as among the nation’s very best community colleges, and he credited current and former employees as the reasons for this exceptional national achievement.

 

“We are extremely pleased with this news, and I give total credit for this honor to the outstanding work of our faculty and staff and our supportive community,” he said. “The reason we are the second-best community college in America is because our employees and supportive community are among our nation’s very best. Most importantly, this honor shows our faculty and staff members are providing extraordinary service helping students succeed so they can improve their lives and the lives of their families for our wonderful community.”

 

Topping SmartAsset’s list this year was Cloud County Community College of Concordia, Kan. Five other North Carolina community colleges made the Top 10, including Catawba Valley (3), Blue Ridge (5), McDowell Technical (6), Coastal Carolina (9) and Johnston (10).

“We congratulate Cloud County Community College for its achievement,” Ross said. “They scored a 100 on SmartAsset’s scale, while we posted a 99.81, so we were extremely close to the top spot. We also are very happy for our North Carolina colleagues who made the list. North Carolina’s community colleges are tremendous assets for our state, and we are pleased they are receiving national recognition.”

 

News of PCC’s No. 2 ranking by SmartAsset comes just days before registration for the Fall 2019 semester gets underway. It also comes amid several other state and national honors Pamlico Community College has received in recent years.

 

Most notably, the Aspen Institute named PCC to its 2018-19 prestigious list of 150 elite community colleges in America and invited the college to apply for its $1 million Aspen Prize.

 

“These recognitions are something our entire community can celebrate and be proud of,” Ross said. “We are honored to build on the great work of the men and women who preceded us at this college and who laid the foundation for excellence. We invite our local citizens to contact us today to learn about enrolling at Pamlico Community College for this fall semester to allow us to partner with them to help them change their lives for the better.”

 

For more information about enrolling at Pamlico Community College, call 252-249-1851, ext. 3001.

 

 
 

GED Graduates Can Get One Free PCC Course

 

 

July 15, 2019

Pamlico Community College has a new program designed to help men and women who have earned their High School Equivalency diplomas here keep their academic momentum going.

 

Students who complete their GEDs or similar high school equivalency at PCC are eligible to receive a “Next Step PHJ Award” that enables them to take one PCC curriculum or Continuing Education course free of charge.

 

The award pays for the student’s enrollment fees and books for a single course they choose.

 

“The idea is to encourage men and women who complete their High School Equivalency Program with us to take the next step,” said Lori Giles, the college’s chair of Continuing Education and Technical Programs. “We want students to reach their potential.”

 

A student who completed his GED earlier this year is the first person to receive a Next Step PHJ Award. He met with Instructor/Advisor Cameron Kishel last week to discuss his options.

 

Money for the program comes from a PCC Foundation scholarship fund established by Gail Johnson, widow of the college’s founding president, Paul H. Johnson. Paul Johnson was a strong proponent of adult basic education, so Mrs. Johnson also established a scholarship several years ago for GED graduates entering a two-year curriculum program.

 

“We are extremely grateful for Mrs. Johnson’s support of our college and this new effort to encourage GED graduates to continue their studies,” said PCC President Dr. Jim Ross. “We know that higher education is the key to improving people’s lives, so all efforts to increase access and affordability are most welcome. We encourage everyone in Pamlico County who wishes to earn their high school equivalency to allow Pamlico Community College to service them in this important goal.”

 

For more information about the Next Step PHJ Award program or PCC’s High School Equivalency Program, contact Lori Giles at 252-249-1851, ext. 3015, or lgiles@pamlicocc.edu. Registration for fall courses is going on now!

 

 
 

PCC Has Financial Aid Available! Start Now!

 

 

July 8, 2019

Pamlico Community College’s Financial Aid office can help you find the money you need to pursue your educational goals. The time to start the process is now.

 

“Don’t let a lack of money keep you from pursuing your dream of a college education,” said PCC President Dr. Jim Ross. “Our college’s Financial Aid office can help you find the resources you need to enroll, which is the first step toward a better life for you and your family. Now is the time to get started on the financial aid process so you can be ready to register in August.”

 

About 80 percent of PCC students receive some type of financial aid.

 

The first step that current and prospective students should take when applying for financial aid is to complete the FAFSA (Free Application for Federal Student Aid) form, even if they believe they won’t qualify for federal help.

 

The FAFSA form helps PCC determine a student’s need so they can match them with possible scholarships or other federal or state financial aid options.

 

PCC staffers are available to help students complete the form.

 

Much of the financial aid awarded by PCC comes in the form of federal Pell Grants.

 

While need-based Pell Grants help a large number of students attend college, not everyone qualifies for them. That’s where private dollars raised through the PCC Foundation and its scholarship funds can help fill the gap.

 

Thanks to the generosity of private donors, clubs, civic organizations and others, PCC is able to offer scholarships. Unlike loans, scholarships and grants do not have to be paid back.

 

“We are very fortunate to have generous donors who want to help deserving men and women enroll at Pamlico Community College,” Ross said. “We are thankful for their support of our students.”

 

For more information about financial aid, scholarships and completing the FAFSA form, please contact PCC Director of Financial Aid Meredith Beeman at 252-249-1851, ext. 3026, or mbeeman@pamlicocc.edu.

 

Fall Registration is scheduled for Aug. 7 and 8 from 8:30 a.m. to 7 p.m. Seated classes will begin Aug. 19. Online classes start Aug. 28.

 

New students are encouraged to contact the college now to begin the enrollment process so they can be ready to register.

 

For more information about enrolling at PCC this fall, please contact Student Services at 252-249-1851, ext. 3001, or studentservices@pamlicocc.edu. The college is closed on Fridays during the summer.

 

 
 

PCC Honor’s Brinson’s Memory During Parade

 

 

July 1, 2019

Pamlico Community College used last weekend’s Croaker Festival Parade in Oriental as an opportunity to honor the memory of a man who ran the college’s emergency responder and fire safety courses for many years.

 

Because the parade’s theme was “Honoring Our First Responders,” PCC leaders thought it would be appropriate to remember the late Rufus E. Brins